locked Re: Richmond & Danville "Despatch"


Doug Alexander
 

Well Bill, then hooray for tradition!

Doug



On Monday, November 18, 2019, 04:22:22 PM EST, Bill Schafer <bill4501@...> wrote:


No, but it seems to me to have been a common convention at the turn of the last century. And the Wall Street Journal still places a period at the end of its title, even on the app on my cell phone, and even after being purchased by Rupert Murdoch. 

—Bill😱


Another iPhone-generated message

On Nov 18, 2019, at 12:31, Doug Alexander <doug_alexander@...> wrote:

Did you ever get an answer to your "period question"?

I have noticed that on a lot of advertising of the era.  I think that the last holdout, naturally,  was the Wall Street Journal, which ran a period after the word "Journal" well into the 1990s.


Doug Alexander

Model Trains Department
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Kennesaw, GA 30144

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On Monday, October 15, 2018, 08:13:04 PM EDT, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:


I “get” the two spellings but why did the railroad(s) chose to use the archaic version on car sides but not the contract wording? …..I’ll go with Bill Schafer’s “Victorian” era concept. Older items in the SR Presidents’ files use what could be considered archaic words and sentence structure quite often.

Here is another one, I have asked before. Why did the Southern (and other railroads) put a “.” after their roadname on passenger equipment? Here is a superb drawing of a Southern coach dated September 8, 1900. The style disappeared from drawings not long after. 

The punctuation does not show on freight cars, including the two 1897 drawings in the archives.

Ike

PS If we had the highest quality prints made we could get of this coach, a wide vestibule version, a combine and a mail and baggage car, would anyone be interested in buying copies to support the SRHA archives?

<1.B.27 57ft Passenger Car Lettering Diagram.jpeg>

On Oct 15, 2018, at 6:28 PM, darrell2010 via Groups.Io <darrell2010@...> wrote:

Ike,

Per a dictionary, "despatch" has the same meaning as "dispatch", but was a common spelling in the 19th century before dispatch became the more common spelling.

Darrell Sawyer


On Monday, October 15, 2018, 3:35:17 PM MDT, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:


Until I learn how to cut some of the "thread" material out of messages, I'll make this separate.

Looking around in the SRHA digital files for additional info on the SR Arrow monogram, I found the attached stencil scheme for
Southern vent box cars from 1897. The "billboard" stencil uses new "SR" initials but also includes "R&D Despatch" negotiated
Aug 1, 1887. (Contract No 28, the cover and page 1 are attached. I can post the other six pages if anyone is interested.)

One question I cannot find an answer for.....why is "dispatch" spelled "despatch" here and on "Atlantic Coast Despatch" (PRR/ACL)? from the same period?
Note the cover and first page of the contract use "dispatch" spelling.

Ike

Ike

<1.B.27 57ft Passenger Car Lettering Diagram.jpeg>

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