Date   

locked Re: Via Sleeping Car NYC to San Francisco via Atlanta-Montgomery-New Orleans!

Robert Hanson
 

Ike, et al - 

The Pullman Company's  Schedule of Lines dated July 15, 1915, shows a Washington-San Francisco tourist sleeper, line No. 2640 1/2(!) but it was not handled in No. 38, but rather was handled in SOU 29, WPR 39. L&N 3, and SP 101.

Mileage - 3,616.

Bob Hanson
Loganville, GA


-----Original Message-----
From: George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...>
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io>; PassengerCarList@groups.io
Sent: Sat, Nov 21, 2020 7:30 pm
Subject: [SouthernRailway] Via Sleeping Car NYC to San Francisco via Atlanta-Montgomery-New Orleans!

From the SRHA archives:

The attached letter from the L&N to Southern dated Nov 2, 1914 discusses the handling of a tourist sleeping car to San Francisco. Research in “Guides” and PTTs could confirm the route. Assuming it went through Washington to NYC, could this the longest Pullman line in the US?

Ike


locked Re: Via Sleeping Car NYC to San Francisco via Atlanta-Montgomery-New Orleans!

Jason Greene
 

Now that is interesting that they can put the car on whatever train they want. Seems like it would need to keep a schedule. Would you get a ticket to arrive on a specific date and not time?
Also, what route from N.O. I wonder? SP to LA then north or dropped somewhere earlier and moved north before LA. 

Jason Greene 

On Nov 21, 2020, at 7:31 PM, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

From the SRHA archives:

The attached letter from the L&N to Southern dated Nov 2, 1914 discusses the handling of a tourist sleeping car to San Francisco. Research in “Guides” and PTTs could confirm the route. Assuming it went through Washington to NYC, could this the longest Pullman line in the US?

Ike

<1914-11-2 L&N Tr 2 San Francisco tourist car.jpeg>


locked Via Sleeping Car NYC to San Francisco via Atlanta-Montgomery-New Orleans!

George Eichelberger
 

From the SRHA archives:

The attached letter from the L&N to Southern dated Nov 2, 1914 discusses the handling of a tourist sleeping car to San Francisco. Research in “Guides” and PTTs could confirm the route. Assuming it went through Washington to NYC, could this the longest Pullman line in the US?

Ike


locked 1930-35 era lettering for low side gon?

A&Y Dave in MD
 

I have builder's photos from 1924, but that was before the 1928 lettering changes recommended by American Railway Association.  And then there was further changes recommended by the AAR when it was formed in '34.

I have lots of photos of the 1937-1943 rebuilds, but can find no information or photos of 1930 era lettering.

Other than volunteering at the SRHA archives, is there any information available on the lettering (either photos or lettering diagrams) that are specific to the period from 1930-1935?

I've been through all my books and photos and the best I can find is the Duke University construction images from 1929-1930 which show the early pre-1928 scheme and the Southern Railway Handbook's 1924 builders photo.   I can find absolutely nothing from then to 1937, when there are rebuild photos (although mostly dated from 1943-1956).

I'd like to backdate at least two of my Speedwitch media kits to 1934.  I've already developed the artwork for the lettering on the 1929 photos.  I'd like to have one in what I believe is a simplified scheme (at least that's what I see with boxcars and vents).  Can someone confirm that the 1943 scheme would have been identical to that of the early 30's or share an early 30's photo or lettering diagram?

Dave Bott

Attached is an example of my 1928 scheme artwork (although the actual vector artwork is in Adobe Illustrator).


--

Sent from David Bott's desktop pc


locked Re: Sleeping Var Passengers out of Washington week of Jan 7, 1915

C J Wyatt
 

We weren't in the Great War yet, but we were coming out of a recession which lasted from January 1913 until December 1914.

Jack Wyatt

On Friday, November 20, 2020, 06:27:37 PM EST, Edwin Locklin <elocklin@...> wrote:


Ike,
 
Could World War 1 have had any affect on ridership?  WW1 took place from early 1914 towards the end of 1918 which cover these notices on ridership.  My two cents.
 
Ed Locklin at mp367.
 

 
From: George Eichelberger
Sent: Friday, November 20, 2020 1:28 PM
To: PassengerCarList@groups.io
Cc: main@southernrailway.groups.io
Subject: [SouthernRailway] Sleeping Var Passengers out of Washington week of Jan 7, 1915
 
I posted the attached to the SouthernRailway.io group yesterday and added the Dec 11, 1914 memo today. Other than business being down, it appears the PRR was demanding an increased share of the Pullman fares on trains through Washington. Obviously, more research is needed…is any one aware of what the issue was….circa 1914?
 
Ike
 
 
Begin forwarded message:
 
From: george eichelberger <geichelberger@...>
Subject: Sleeping Var Passengers out of Washington week of Jan 7, 1915
Date: November 19, 2020 at 1:06:04 PM EST
To: "main@southernrailway.groups.io" <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io>
 
From the SRHA Archives:
 
Southern Railway passenger traffic was down in 1915. Washington headquarters asked for almost continuous reports on Pullman passengers, usually to determine if lines should be discontinued. Although a comprehensive list of Pullman Line Numbers on the Southern has never been located in the Presidents’ or Mechanical Dept. files, the summaries sent to Washington give a good sense of how many different lines operated between various city pairs. In this example, trains out of Washington, DC.
 
Ike
 
 
 


locked Re: Sleeping Var Passengers out of Washington week of Jan 7, 1915

Carl Ardrey
 

January 1915 would have been over two years before USA's entry into WWI.

On 11/20/2020 2:21 PM Edwin Locklin <elocklin@...> wrote:
 
 
Ike,
 
Could World War 1 have had any affect on ridership?  WW1 took place from early 1914 towards the end of 1918 which cover these notices on ridership.  My two cents.
 
Ed Locklin at mp367.
 

 
From: George Eichelberger
Sent: Friday, November 20, 2020 1:28 PM
To: PassengerCarList@groups.io
Cc: main@southernrailway.groups.io
Subject: [SouthernRailway] Sleeping Var Passengers out of Washington week of Jan 7, 1915
 
I posted the attached to the SouthernRailway.io group yesterday and added the Dec 11, 1914 memo today. Other than business being down, it appears the PRR was demanding an increased share of the Pullman fares on trains through Washington. Obviously, more research is needed…is any one aware of what the issue was….circa 1914?
 
Ike
 
 
Begin forwarded message:
 
From: george eichelberger <geichelberger@...>
Subject: Sleeping Var Passengers out of Washington week of Jan 7, 1915
Date: November 19, 2020 at 1:06:04 PM EST
To: "main@southernrailway.groups.io" <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io>
 
From the SRHA Archives:
 
Southern Railway passenger traffic was down in 1915. Washington headquarters asked for almost continuous reports on Pullman passengers, usually to determine if lines should be discontinued. Although a comprehensive list of Pullman Line Numbers on the Southern has never been located in the Presidents’ or Mechanical Dept. files, the summaries sent to Washington give a good sense of how many different lines operated between various city pairs. In this example, trains out of Washington, DC.
 
Ike
 
 
 


locked Re: Sleeping Var Passengers out of Washington week of Jan 7, 1915

 

Ike,
 
Could World War 1 have had any affect on ridership?  WW1 took place from early 1914 towards the end of 1918 which cover these notices on ridership.  My two cents.
 
Ed Locklin at mp367.
 

 

From: George Eichelberger
Sent: Friday, November 20, 2020 1:28 PM
To: PassengerCarList@groups.io
Cc: main@southernrailway.groups.io
Subject: [SouthernRailway] Sleeping Var Passengers out of Washington week of Jan 7, 1915
 
I posted the attached to the SouthernRailway.io group yesterday and added the Dec 11, 1914 memo today. Other than business being down, it appears the PRR was demanding an increased share of the Pullman fares on trains through Washington. Obviously, more research is needed…is any one aware of what the issue was….circa 1914?
 
Ike
 
 
Begin forwarded message:
 
From: george eichelberger <geichelberger@...>
Subject: Sleeping Var Passengers out of Washington week of Jan 7, 1915
Date: November 19, 2020 at 1:06:04 PM EST
To: "main@southernrailway.groups.io" <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io>
 
From the SRHA Archives:
 
Southern Railway passenger traffic was down in 1915. Washington headquarters asked for almost continuous reports on Pullman passengers, usually to determine if lines should be discontinued. Although a comprehensive list of Pullman Line Numbers on the Southern has never been located in the Presidents’ or Mechanical Dept. files, the summaries sent to Washington give a good sense of how many different lines operated between various city pairs. In this example, trains out of Washington, DC.
 
Ike
 
 
 


locked Re: Sleeping Var Passengers out of Washington week of Jan 7, 1915

Michael Roderick
 

Ike:

 

I have reached out to one of my PRR friends for that information when I get it I will send you the information.

 

Mike

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io> On Behalf Of George Eichelberger
Sent: Friday, November 20, 2020 13:28
To: PassengerCarList@groups.io
Cc: main@southernrailway.groups.io
Subject: [SouthernRailway] Sleeping Var Passengers out of Washington week of Jan 7, 1915

 

I posted the attached to the SouthernRailway.io group yesterday and added the Dec 11, 1914 memo today. Other than business being down, it appears the PRR was demanding an increased share of the Pullman fares on trains through Washington. Obviously, more research is needed…is any one aware of what the issue was….circa 1914?

 

Ike

 

 

Begin forwarded message:

 

From: george eichelberger <geichelberger@...>

Subject: Sleeping Var Passengers out of Washington week of Jan 7, 1915

Date: November 19, 2020 at 1:06:04 PM EST

 

From the SRHA Archives:

 

Southern Railway passenger traffic was down in 1915. Washington headquarters asked for almost continuous reports on Pullman passengers, usually to determine if lines should be discontinued. Although a comprehensive list of Pullman Line Numbers on the Southern has never been located in the Presidents’ or Mechanical Dept. files, the summaries sent to Washington give a good sense of how many different lines operated between various city pairs. In this example, trains out of Washington, DC.

 

Ike

 

 

 


locked Sleeping Var Passengers out of Washington week of Jan 7, 1915

George Eichelberger
 

I posted the attached to the SouthernRailway.io group yesterday and added the Dec 11, 1914 memo today. Other than business being down, it appears the PRR was demanding an increased share of the Pullman fares on trains through Washington. Obviously, more research is needed…is any one aware of what the issue was….circa 1914?

Ike


Begin forwarded message:

From: george eichelberger <geichelberger@...>
Subject: Sleeping Var Passengers out of Washington week of Jan 7, 1915
Date: November 19, 2020 at 1:06:04 PM EST

From the SRHA Archives:

Southern Railway passenger traffic was down in 1915. Washington headquarters asked for almost continuous reports on Pullman passengers, usually to determine if lines should be discontinued. Although a comprehensive list of Pullman Line Numbers on the Southern has never been located in the Presidents’ or Mechanical Dept. files, the summaries sent to Washington give a good sense of how many different lines operated between various city pairs. In this example, trains out of Washington, DC.

Ike




locked Sleeping Var Passengers out of Washington week of Jan 7, 1915

George Eichelberger
 

From the SRHA Archives:

Southern Railway passenger traffic was down in 1915. Washington headquarters asked for almost continuous reports on Pullman passengers, usually to determine if lines should be discontinued. Although a comprehensive list of Pullman Line Numbers on the Southern has never been located in the Presidents’ or Mechanical Dept. files, the summaries sent to Washington give a good sense of how many different lines operated between various city pairs. In this example, trains out of Washington, DC.

Ike


locked Last call for SOU/NS GS50/G82 wood chip hopper kits reservation

Jim King
 

I’m very close to reaching “critical mass” to justify another run of SOU/NS GS50/G82 large wood chip hopper kits in HO.  If interested, pls reply OFF LIST to this email with the quantity of each kit you want and your mailing address

 

No money required.  When I reach the minimum number of kits required to justify another run, you will be emailed at that time with an invoice to pay for the entire order.  If payment is not rec’d before production begins, your order will be cancelled.

 

This will be the LAST run of these kits and no extra kits beyond prepaid orders will be inventoried.  The patterns will be retired and mothballed.  Now is the time to reserve your kits.

 

To view info about these kits, please visit here:  https://smokymountainmodelworks.com/HO_rolling_stock.html

 

Jim King

http://smokymountainmodelworks.com/

 


locked Southern's Land and Immigration Department Question

Joel Walker
 

Does the Archives have any documents dealing with the Land and Immigration Department for the 1890s and early 1900s? I have searched the SRHA finding aids but have not found any references.  This is what I know so far.

When Samuel Spencer was president of the B & O, he started the Land and Immigration department at the B & O and hired Milton V. Richards to manage it  In November of 1894, Spencer did the same at Southern and Richards resigned at the B & O and would operate Southern's program for twenty-some years. The program was similar to those operated by the western railroads. It encouraged immigrants to 'colonize' in the south but Southern's program also promoted new industries in the region.

Richard's obituary in the Washington (D.C.) Evening Star (1918) states that he was the "Dean of Railway Development" and "the man responsible for the development of the 'industrial South.'" It goes on to say that Richards "induced New England manufacturers to send capital to the South" which "resulted in the development of several textile industries." 

Very high praise. Richards was on 59 when he died..

Any information would be appreciated.

Joel Walker


locked Re: Single or Double Track

Tim
 

I think it likely that the traffic feeding into Atlanta, Birmingham, and Chattanooga on the double track was divided over several routes at those cities, or was for places located there (especially Atlanta and Birmingham).

Tim Rumph
Lancaster, SC


locked Re: Single or Double Track

Jason Greene
 

I have often found it odd that the AGS coming north into Birmingham warranted double track, the CNO&TP north of Chattanooga was double track, and the Main from Atlanta to Washington was double track, but the AGS from Chatty to Bham and the GP from Atl to Bham were both single track. What happened to all the traffic between Birmingham and the other two cities? I know the GP was twisted and hilly but they could have made it double track if it was warranted. The AGS was relatively flat and straight.

Jason Greene

On Wed, Nov 4, 2020 at 9:46 AM George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:
Allen:

The SR was quite proud of it s double track, so much so the maps in the PTTs show it…

Here’s two from the 1954 PTT.

Ike



On Nov 4, 2020, at 8:31 AM, Allen Cain <Allencaintn@...> wrote:

I realize that this is a VERY general question.

In 1955 would the Southern main lines be predominantly single or double track?

Washington to Atlanta?

Bristol to Chattanooga?

Others?

Thanks,

Allen Cain


locked Re: Single or Double Track

George Eichelberger
 

Allen:

The SR was quite proud of it s double track, so much so the maps in the PTTs show it…

Here’s two from the 1954 PTT.

Ike



On Nov 4, 2020, at 8:31 AM, Allen Cain <Allencaintn@...> wrote:

I realize that this is a VERY general question.

In 1955 would the Southern main lines be predominantly single or double track?

Washington to Atlanta?

Bristol to Chattanooga?

Others?

Thanks,

Allen Cain


locked Re: Single or Double Track

Sam Smith
 

Allen,
I don't know if it is a "main line", but the old G.S.&F. Line through south Georgia is single......but does have passing sidings south of Sycamore and on north side of Valdosta.


On Wed, Nov 4, 2020 at 8:31 AM, Allen Cain
<Allencaintn@...> wrote:
I realize that this is a VERY general question.

In 1955 would the Southern main lines be predominantly single or double track?

Washington to Atlanta?

Bristol to Chattanooga?

Others?

Thanks,

Allen Cain


locked Single or Double Track

Allen Cain
 

I realize that this is a VERY general question.

In 1955 would the Southern main lines be predominantly single or double track?

Washington to Atlanta?

Bristol to Chattanooga?

Others?

Thanks,

Allen Cain


locked Power On Trains 71 and 72 1976 and 1974

Tom Holley
 

Hello, list.

Sometime ago I made a list of some of the engines my father handled on trains 71 and 72 between Columbus, GA and Montgomery, AL on the old Central of Georgia in 1974 and 1976. The lists are old, and not visually attractive, but they show typical Southern power on a secondary mainline in the mid 1970s.

If there's any interest, email me at th498@... and I'll send them to you. Or, if there's enough interest, I'll post them here. They are jpg files.

Regards,

Tom Holley


locked Re: CNO&TP Insurance Policy

John Stewart
 

Hi Ike and all,

 

This is pretty amazing.

 

The UK online archive has a “Nollau” photo collection which contains a lot of AGS material.  He was an engineering professor and apparently did work for the AGS.  The archive includes (online) most every building/tank/structure from Meridian to Cinnci in (if memory serves) around WWI

 

Some of the descriptions by archivists are a hoot – not railroad folks

 

https://exploreuk.uky.edu/fa/findingaid/?id=xt7n8p5v9x1t#fa-heading-ref417

 

John

 

John R Stewart

www.bhamrails.info

205-901-3790

 

image004

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io [mailto:main@SouthernRailway.groups.io] On Behalf Of George Eichelberger
Sent: Monday, November 2, 2020 11:45 AM
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io
Subject: [SouthernRailway] CNO&TP Insurance Policy

 

The Southern Railway Presidents’ Files in the SRHA Archives go from “interesting and useful” to simply “unusual”. Box 15 File 215 contains an insurance policy for the CNO&TP and AGS dated January 18, 1893 issued by the New York office of the Royal Insurance Co. of Liverpool England. The policy includes “schedules” listing the structures and rolling stock from Cincinnati to Chattanooga ($1,940, 350) and the AGS from Chattanooga to Attala, AL.

 

The fifteen plus pages are all hand written…..

 

Ike

 

 


locked CNO&TP Insurance Policy

George Eichelberger
 

The Southern Railway Presidents’ Files in the SRHA Archives go from “interesting and useful” to simply “unusual”. Box 15 File 215 contains an insurance policy for the CNO&TP and AGS dated January 18, 1893 issued by the New York office of the Royal Insurance Co. of Liverpool England. The policy includes “schedules” listing the structures and rolling stock from Cincinnati to Chattanooga ($1,940, 350) and the AGS from Chattanooga to Attala, AL.

The fifteen plus pages are all hand written…..

Ike


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