Date   

locked Sands And Company

Carl Ardrey
 

Scanning some Washington Division files and came across a file on Sands and Co.  Evidently, early on they had some competition and the Southern Railway split the territory.


locked Re: Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars

bjarne@juno.com
 

When I worked as a dining car waiter for Amtrak in the 1970s, some of the more senior guys would talk about how they laid out their bedrolls on the floor of the diner. The tables had latches that folded up and the chairs could be moved to the sides. Linens were kept in lockers at the end of the dining car or in trap door lockers in the floor. It was not very comfortable -- but given that almost everything was made from scratch -- they probably did not have lights out until after 11 pm and then had to be back on duty to prep the car for breakfast starting at 4:30 or 5 am for a 6 o'clock breakfast start. It was a hard life; dorms were definitely a step up -- though some dorms were better than others. I preferred the SP and UP ones. The lounge dorms were the worst as you had the noise of the drunks. The combines -- depending on where you had your bunk -- had the noise of baggage being handled at night -- or, in the case of the El Cap combines, had a nasty habit of losing their air conditioning. Stewards and lounge car attendants with cash and keys had rooms -- bedrooms for stewards and roomettes or slumbercoach rooms for lounge car attendants. /s/ Bjarne Henderson, Valparaiso, IN


locked Re: Double Track Projects in 1909

Stephen Warner
 

Interesting that Sevier to Morristown was not listed, as this was the only DT east of Knoxville that to my knowledge was put into place.  I wonder when that was put in.  But if one assumes that all traffic between Sevier and Carnegie/Asheville combined used this route, this would amount to 58 trains every 24 hr. period, or 1802 for the month of Oct.  Also that made dispatching easier for such volumes as Rule (D) 251 allowed both tracks to operate independently by direction under ABS with only a Clearance Card required to operate.


locked Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars

Robert W. Grabarek, Jr.
 

Can anyone provide details of the sleeping arrangements made when dining car crews slept overnight on their diners?  For example, were boards placed on or between the tables?  Were the stewards accommodated in the same manner?

Thanks.

Bob Grabarek


locked Greensboro Passenger Station

Robert W. Grabarek, Jr.
 

The passenger station in Greensboro, NC, (opened in 1926) had platform tracks numbered 1,2,3,4,5,and 6.  There was a through track between tracks 2 and 3.  Does anyone know the name or number of this through track?

Bob Grabarek


locked Double Track Projects in 1909

George Eichelberger
 

The passage of the law limiting train crews to 16 hour days plus increasing traffic on the Southern led the Washington office to ask for train counts on routes that might be candidates for double track projects.
Here is one part of the response from the General Superintendent at Knoxville…

Ike



locked Re: AAR Cars on Home Roads Letter

Aidrian Bridgeman-Sutton
 

Ike, 

Thank you for posting that  - it's a fascinating set of numbers that might challenge some long held ideas, especially in relation to the movement of hoppers and gondolas

Aidrian

On Mon, Mar 1, 2021 at 1:25 AM George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:
From the SRHA Archives:

AAR letters for the years during and after WWII are “rich” in freight car information. The Southern typically had many cars off line by design. Per Diem revenues were an important income.

Ike


locked Re: Southern Ps4 4-6-2 Crescent Paint Question

Jeffrey Thompson
 

George,

No Ps-3 engines in the line-up. Only Ps-4s.  

Jeff


On Mar 1, 2021, at 8:39 PM, George Courtney via groups.io <gsc3@...> wrote:

Jeff,

    In your Southern Passenger loco lineup, are any PS-3's?  I would guess next to your beautiful, 1380.  Sheer dumb curiousity.


locked Re: Southern Ps4 4-6-2 Crescent Paint Question

Aidrian Bridgeman-Sutton
 

Ray, sorry to be slow in answering.

The finishing practices for steam engines changed in 1934 and I don't
think any of the special lettered Crescent Limited engines were
repainted in the new style before the train was discontinued. The old
scheme was provided with gold leaf lining and striping and the whole
engine varnished before it went into service; the later scheme used an
enamel-type finish with striping and lettering painted on using
imitation gold and the varnish coat was left off. T

The varnish is what made the difference; the older colour is
sometimes referred to as "Virginia Green" and reportedly appeared
slightly darker than the later colour. Dupont colours were used in
both styles and, as far as I can tell after the thick end of ninety
years, the basic shade of green didn't change significantly as the
paint name stayed the same.

Varnish of the period tended to be a deep amber colour which acted as
a sort of filter on the reflected light, resulting in a rather deeper
and richer finish then the bare enamel paint. In full size work you
can still achieve this look by using yacht varnish over the top coat,
but the very thin coat you would need for model work would lose much
of the effect. If you can get Scalecoat paints ( we haven't seen them
in these parts for many years and my last bottle has now passed on)
then a little dab of reddish brown added to their Southern green will
get you some of the way.

Aidrian

On Thu, Feb 18, 2021 at 4:38 PM Ray Bedard <tczephyr@hotmail.com> wrote:

I'm in the process of painting a Ps4 4-6-2 in the Crescent Ltd green. Does anyone have any suggestions on what brand and what green best represents the prototype?
Thanks,
RAY


locked Re: Southern Ps4 4-6-2 Crescent Paint Question

George Courtney
 

Jeff,

    In your Southern Passenger loco lineup, are any PS-3's?  I would guess next to your beautiful, 1380.  Sheer dumb curiousity.


locked AAR Cars on Home Roads Letter

George Eichelberger
 

From the SRHA Archives:

AAR letters for the years during and after WWII are “rich” in freight car information. The Southern typically had many cars off line by design. Per Diem revenues were an important income.

Ike


locked Re: Inman Yard in 1946 or 47

John Stewart
 

Hi again

 

Sorry, I was reading too fast.  I see reference to the date and to the fire.

 

Great picture, poor reader here…

 

John R Stewart

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io [mailto:main@SouthernRailway.groups.io] On Behalf Of George Eichelberger
Sent: Saturday, February 20, 2021 1:21 PM
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Subject: [SouthernRailway] Inman Yard in 1946 or 47

 

The SRHA archives includes many more photos than we can probably ever use in TIES or SRHA books. Here is an undated example that includes a variety of topics.

Although the photo is undated, we know that the Southern box car in the foreground of the photo is one of 1,000 post-war all steel design box cars built by Pullman-Standard and delivered in 1946 or 47 and the (most likely) NW-2 helps date the photo to 1947. No caption came with the image but it may be an Atlanta newspaper photo taken as part of the coverage of the fire in the distance.

The Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha stock car coupled to the (very unusual!) dry ice car is a long way from home. The WFE car at Inman suggests the photo may have been taken during the Florida citrus, vegetable or peach shipping seasons when WFE equipment was moved east. The process reversed when apples were in season and FGE cars went west (there are mentions in the archives of solid trains of empty "reefers" moving back and forth as the seasons changed). The Inman icing platform is still in service and working, another "sign" it is peach or citrus season. With multiple Southern routes and railroads out of Atlanta, Inman was a diversion and re-icing point for northbound perishables.

The brakeman standing on the running board of the second car from the switch engine would be "interesting" during switch moves!

A great photo!

Ike



Forty-foot box cars are seen throughout the yard.


locked Re: Inman Yard in 1946 or 47

John Stewart
 

Hi folks

 

That is a great picture for sure.  Thanks for sharing.  Looks like something is “afire” in the distance.  Guessing the picture is what, about 1950?

 

John R Stewart

Birmingham, AL

 

 

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io [mailto:main@SouthernRailway.groups.io] On Behalf Of George Eichelberger
Sent: Saturday, February 20, 2021 1:21 PM
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Subject: [SouthernRailway] Inman Yard in 1946 or 47

 

The SRHA archives includes many more photos than we can probably ever use in TIES or SRHA books. Here is an undated example that includes a variety of topics.

Although the photo is undated, we know that the Southern box car in the foreground of the photo is one of 1,000 post-war all steel design box cars built by Pullman-Standard and delivered in 1946 or 47 and the (most likely) NW-2 helps date the photo to 1947. No caption came with the image but it may be an Atlanta newspaper photo taken as part of the coverage of the fire in the distance.

The Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha stock car coupled to the (very unusual!) dry ice car is a long way from home. The WFE car at Inman suggests the photo may have been taken during the Florida citrus, vegetable or peach shipping seasons when WFE equipment was moved east. The process reversed when apples were in season and FGE cars went west (there are mentions in the archives of solid trains of empty "reefers" moving back and forth as the seasons changed). The Inman icing platform is still in service and working, another "sign" it is peach or citrus season. With multiple Southern routes and railroads out of Atlanta, Inman was a diversion and re-icing point for northbound perishables.

The brakeman standing on the running board of the second car from the switch engine would be "interesting" during switch moves!

A great photo!

Ike



Forty-foot box cars are seen throughout the yard.


locked Re: Inman Yard in 1946 or 47

sou1952 hayes
 

Is that the Control Tower that is on fire?

Chris



-----Original Message-----
From: George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...>
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Feb 20, 2021 2:20 pm
Subject: [SouthernRailway] Inman Yard in 1946 or 47

The SRHA archives includes many more photos than we can probably ever use in TIES or SRHA books. Here is an undated example that includes a variety of topics.

Although the photo is undated, we know that the Southern box car in the foreground of the photo is one of 1,000 post-war all steel design box cars built by Pullman-Standard and delivered in 1946 or 47 and the (most likely) NW-2 helps date the photo to 1947. No caption came with the image but it may be an Atlanta newspaper photo taken as part of the coverage of the fire in the distance.

The Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha stock car coupled to the (very unusual!) dry ice car is a long way from home. The WFE car at Inman suggests the photo may have been taken during the Florida citrus, vegetable or peach shipping seasons when WFE equipment was moved east. The process reversed when apples were in season and FGE cars went west (there are mentions in the archives of solid trains of empty "reefers" moving back and forth as the seasons changed). The Inman icing platform is still in service and working, another "sign" it is peach or citrus season. With multiple Southern routes and railroads out of Atlanta, Inman was a diversion and re-icing point for northbound perishables.

The brakeman standing on the running board of the second car from the switch engine would be "interesting" during switch moves!

A great photo!

Ike



Forty-foot box cars are seen throughout the yard.


locked Re: Inman Yard in 1946 or 47

C J Wyatt
 

Seems like I have seen other pictures from that era with dry ice cars at Inman. I wonder if the nearby packing plant used dry ice?

Jack Wyatt

On Saturday, February 20, 2021, 03:08:07 PM EST, Kyle Shannon via groups.io <trainsr6900@...> wrote:


The dry ice car is another neat oddity in this photo.




locked Re: Inman Yard in 1946 or 47

Kyle Shannon
 

The dry ice car is another neat oddity in this photo.




On Saturday, February 20, 2021, 2:20 PM, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

The SRHA archives includes many more photos than we can probably ever use in TIES or SRHA books. Here is an undated example that includes a variety of topics.

Although the photo is undated, we know that the Southern box car in the foreground of the photo is one of 1,000 post-war all steel design box cars built by Pullman-Standard and delivered in 1946 or 47 and the (most likely) NW-2 helps date the photo to 1947. No caption came with the image but it may be an Atlanta newspaper photo taken as part of the coverage of the fire in the distance.

The Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha stock car coupled to the (very unusual!) dry ice car is a long way from home. The WFE car at Inman suggests the photo may have been taken during the Florida citrus, vegetable or peach shipping seasons when WFE equipment was moved east. The process reversed when apples were in season and FGE cars went west (there are mentions in the archives of solid trains of empty "reefers" moving back and forth as the seasons changed). The Inman icing platform is still in service and working, another "sign" it is peach or citrus season. With multiple Southern routes and railroads out of Atlanta, Inman was a diversion and re-icing point for northbound perishables.

The brakeman standing on the running board of the second car from the switch engine would be "interesting" during switch moves!

A great photo!

Ike



Forty-foot box cars are seen throughout the yard.


locked Inman Yard in 1946 or 47

George Eichelberger
 

The SRHA archives includes many more photos than we can probably ever use in TIES or SRHA books. Here is an undated example that includes a variety of topics.

Although the photo is undated, we know that the Southern box car in the foreground of the photo is one of 1,000 post-war all steel design box cars built by Pullman-Standard and delivered in 1946 or 47 and the (most likely) NW-2 helps date the photo to 1947. No caption came with the image but it may be an Atlanta newspaper photo taken as part of the coverage of the fire in the distance.

The Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha stock car coupled to the (very unusual!) dry ice car is a long way from home. The WFE car at Inman suggests the photo may have been taken during the Florida citrus, vegetable or peach shipping seasons when WFE equipment was moved east. The process reversed when apples were in season and FGE cars went west (there are mentions in the archives of solid trains of empty "reefers" moving back and forth as the seasons changed). The Inman icing platform is still in service and working, another "sign" it is peach or citrus season. With multiple Southern routes and railroads out of Atlanta, Inman was a diversion and re-icing point for northbound perishables.

The brakeman standing on the running board of the second car from the switch engine would be "interesting" during switch moves!

A great photo!

Ike



Forty-foot box cars are seen throughout the yard.


locked Re: Southern Ps4 4-6-2 Crescent Paint Question

O Fenton Wells
 

Unfortunately that's not my beautiful collection of Southern locos

--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


locked Re: Southern Ps4 4-6-2 Crescent Paint Question

jackvaradi
 

Fenton,
Beautiful collection of SRR Steam! Didn't see the F-1.
Thanks,
Jack

On Thursday, February 18, 2021, 02:18:56 PM EST, Jeffrey Thompson <jhtmd1@...> wrote:


First time posting.  Hello to all.

Agree with Southern Scalecoat I for brass and II for plastic. Experimenting with Trucolor greens now.

Most of these are Scalecoat and variation seems to be with different amounts of clear and dull coats.



Jeff Thompson


On Feb 18, 2021, at 12:48 PM, O Fenton Wells <srrfan1401@...> wrote:


My choice is Scale Coat Southern Green, I for brass and II for plastic
Fenton

On Thu, Feb 18, 2021 at 11:44 AM Curt Fortenberry <curtfortenberry@...> wrote:

The best SR green, that never starts an argument here ;-)

Could ask over on the SR modeling group too.  ModelingTheSouthern@...


Curt Fortenberry



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


locked Re: Southern Ps4 4-6-2 Crescent Paint Question

Michael Roderick
 

Jeff:

Nice set of Southern Green on display.

Mike Roderick 


On Feb 18, 2021, at 14:18, Jeffrey Thompson <jhtmd1@...> wrote:

 First time posting.  Hello to all.

Agree with Southern Scalecoat I for brass and II for plastic. Experimenting with Trucolor greens now.

Most of these are Scalecoat and variation seems to be with different amounts of clear and dull coats.

<image0.jpeg>


Jeff Thompson


On Feb 18, 2021, at 12:48 PM, O Fenton Wells <srrfan1401@...> wrote:


My choice is Scale Coat Southern Green, I for brass and II for plastic
Fenton

On Thu, Feb 18, 2021 at 11:44 AM Curt Fortenberry <curtfortenberry@...> wrote:

The best SR green, that never starts an argument here ;-)

Could ask over on the SR modeling group too.  ModelingTheSouthern@...


Curt Fortenberry



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...

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