Date   

locked Re: Greensboro map was Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars

Steve Ellis
 

Thank you again, Mr. Schafer. I have mentioned by trip on the Southern Railway in October 1970 a few times. I just wanted to add that it was very refreshing to meet a friendly crew when I got on the Southern.


That was actually a trip that began far to the north in a place called Bathurst, New Brunswick, Canada. That is where I lived until I graduated from high school and for a few months afterwards. I hated the winters up there, and I dreamed of going to Georgia throughout my high school career. I worked that summer and earned enough money for a train trip to Atlanta.


I went to Montreal on the CNR where I had to change trains. I belong to a Canadian train group as well, and I have asked them if they know any reason why people working on the Delaware and Hudson/Penn Central train from Montreal to New York City at that time were so ill tempered.


This was my first trip into the US, and I was full of anticipation and excitement about a place I had longed to go. At Windsor Station in Montreal, I went through the gate, and I saw the train. I asked the conductor there where the coach cars were, and he literally screamed back at me: “Where are you going?” I replied that I was going to Atlanta, and he screamed back at somebody else “New York.” 


I got on the train, and I found a café car and wanted to buy a cold drink. The attendant there screamed at me: “What do you want?“ I asked him if he had any Coke, and he screamed back: “No!” 


I was beginning to wonder if everything was going to be different south of the border because everybody seemed so disagreeable. I started walking back toward my seat, and I met the first friendly crewmember there was. He was a black man wearing a white cotton jacket, and he had apparently heard the exchange between the cafe  attendant and me. He kindly asked: “Did you get your soda?”  I said no that the man said he didn’t have any.


People on the Penn Central between New York City and Washington were reasonable if not overly friendly. People on the Southern Railroad were very nice, and I was feeling better all the time. I went to the dining car, and I was a little confused that I had to write my own order, but the crew was very cordial.


On the way back going north out of New York City, the train was a combined Montreal and Chicago train that split at Albany. Perhaps 45 minutes or an hour after we left Grand Central Terminal, the conductor came through the car with a male passenger following him. 


Just like the conductor I first met in Windsor Station in Montreal, this man was an older person, and he seemed to be in just as bad mood as the first one I met. 


He yelled out loudly enough so that everybody in the car could hear: “Is anybody else on this car going to Chicago? This car is going to Montreal.”   Nobody answered him and so he said, in a very impolite tone to the passenger with him: “Come on!”


I wonder if the reason those employees were so unhappy is because they knew Amtrak was coming in a few months, and they were afraid they were going to lose their job. On the other hand, I wonder if this was their normal demeanor. Maybe it was just because I was a skinny kid at the time, and they didn’t want to be bothered with me.

Certainly it was not true on the Southern. Their attitude was much more positive. I hope that this story was not too long or too boring for people in the group to read.


Steve Ellis






On Mar 16, 2021, at 10:17 AM, Steve Ellis via groups.io <meadowbrookdairy@...> wrote:

This is wonderful detail, Bill. When I rode the train in the fall of 1970, I know that was going to New Orleans on Saturdays. I believe it went all the way to New Orleans seven days a week, didn’t it?

Do you know if the crews were based in Atlanta in those days?


Steve Ellis




On Mar 16, 2021, at 9:59 AM, Bill Schafer <bill4501@...> wrote:

In the years of the post-Amtrak Southern Crescent, the dining and lounge car crews were based in Atlanta. The train ran overnight, every night Atlanta-Washington, and tri-weekly Atlanta-New Orleans. As far as the dining cars were concerned, there were five regular crews that ran on the following cycle (the “crew numbers" are not official; just as a reference):
 
Crew 1, Crew 2, Crew 3 - one long cycle per week, which consisted of going on duty in Atlanta with the fresh dining car, leaving on train 1 for New Orleans. The crew overnighted in New Orleans, worked through Atlanta on train 2 the next day, arriving Washington the next morning, and after an all-day layover, worked back overnight on train 1 to Atlanta. They were off for the rest of the week until their cycle began on the same day of the following week.
 
Crew 4, Crew 5 - two short cycles per week. These crews worked two Atlanta-Washington turn-around trips per week, leaving Atlanta on train 2, arriving Washington the next morning, working south from Washington on train 1 that evening, and arriving the next morning in Atlanta.
 
There was also a dining car extra board where people could fill in as needed for vacation or sick day relief, or be added when heavier passenger loadings were expected. 
 
Post-Amtrak, the tavern car only operated Atlanta-Washington, and I remember only two positions for that service, where the attendants made a turn-around trip every other day. There had to have been some provision for their relief somewhere along the line with an extra board attendant, but how it worked into the scheme escapes me at present. You could not put just anybody into that job - they had to have some experience keeping inventories and handling money, which was beyond the pay grade of a dining car waiter. IIRC, the position of the Southern Crescent’s lounge car attendant was a “waiter-in-charge”, which was the same position as the person in charge of a dinette-coach or a stripped down dining car with a two-man crew - a waiter-in-charge and a chef; no steward. 
 
—Bill
 


locked Re: Dining Car Crew Cycles

Robert Hanson
 

In the pre-Southern Crescent days, when the Crescent (Nos. 37-38) ran via Montgomery and Mobile, the Southern's dining car crews were based in Atlanta, the West Point Route crews were based in Montgomery, and the L&N crews were based in Mobile.

I got this information from a file that I photocopied in the NS archives a number of years ago.

Bob Hanson
Loganville, GA


-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Schafer <bill4501@...>
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Sent: Tue, Mar 16, 2021 10:46 am
Subject: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crew Cycles

This is in reply to Steve Ellis's follow-up question about dining car crew bases other than Atlanta. I'm starting a new thread.

The November 20, 1970 timetable is the first that shows the
 Southern Crescent cut back to tri-weekly between Birmingham and New Orleans, so your trip on a daily Southern Crescent to New Orleans would have been one of the last (as opposed to a tri-weekly Southern Crescent). The daily service Atlanta-Bham continued into the Amtrak era, when it went to tri-weekly effective with the June 1, 1975 timetable. In the post-Amtrak period, the dining car didn’t operate beyond Atlanta; in fact, there was no food service Atlanta-Bham until May 1974, when SOU started offering food/beverage service in a “bar food car”, which photographic evidence suggests was one of the Crescent series sleeper-tavern-lounges.  
 
At one time, maybe as late as the 1960s, Southern dining car crews were based in Cincinnati, Chattanooga, and Washington (and maybe some other places, like Asheville) in addition to Atlanta. I don’t know what their work cycles were; that info is probably in the SRHA archives somewhere. I’m not aware that any full crews were based in New Orleans, at least by the 1950s or 1960s. 
 
During the post-Amtrak Southern Crescent era, I know of at least one steward, Steve Cosmos, who lived in Birmingham, but his crew base was Atlanta. He worked on one of the three long crews and had to deadhead or drive Birmingham-Atlanta to go on or off duty. Pre-Amtrak, Steve had been furloughed for years, but with the clustered retirements in the early-1970s, he was called back to work. I’m sure there were others like him who lived away from Atlanta but had to report there for duty.
 
—Bill
 


locked Re: Dining Car Crew Cycles

Bill Schafer
 

I’m not as familiar with the coach and sleeper attendants. In the Southern Crescent era, most (but not all) were based in Atlanta. I think the coach porters may have worked on a divisional basis, but the sleeping car porters would have stayed with the car for the extent of its assignment. 

—Bill

On Mar 16, 2021, at 10:54, Steve Ellis via groups.io <meadowbrookdairy@...> wrote:

Were car attendants based in the same cities as dining car crews and did they have similar schedules?

On Tuesday, March 16, 2021, 10:51:58 AM EDT, Steve Ellis via groups.io <meadowbrookdairy@...> wrote:


Thank you very much. I really appreciate the information, Bill.

Steve Ellis

On Tuesday, March 16, 2021, 10:46:52 AM EDT, Bill Schafer <bill4501@...> wrote:


This is in reply to Steve Ellis's follow-up question about dining car crew bases other than Atlanta. I'm starting a new thread.

The November 20, 1970 timetable is the first that shows the
 Southern Crescent cut back to tri-weekly between Birmingham and New Orleans, so your trip on a daily Southern Crescent to New Orleans would have been one of the last (as opposed to a tri-weekly Southern Crescent). The daily service Atlanta-Bham continued into the Amtrak era, when it went to tri-weekly effective with the June 1, 1975 timetable. In the post-Amtrak period, the dining car didn’t operate beyond Atlanta; in fact, there was no food service Atlanta-Bham until May 1974, when SOU started offering food/beverage service in a “bar food car”, which photographic evidence suggests was one of the Crescent series sleeper-tavern-lounges.  
 
At one time, maybe as late as the 1960s, Southern dining car crews were based in Cincinnati, Chattanooga, and Washington (and maybe some other places, like Asheville) in addition to Atlanta. I don’t know what their work cycles were; that info is probably in the SRHA archives somewhere. I’m not aware that any full crews were based in New Orleans, at least by the 1950s or 1960s. 
 
During the post-Amtrak Southern Crescent era, I know of at least one steward, Steve Cosmos, who lived in Birmingham, but his crew base was Atlanta. He worked on one of the three long crews and had to deadhead or drive Birmingham-Atlanta to go on or off duty. Pre-Amtrak, Steve had been furloughed for years, but with the clustered retirements in the early-1970s, he was called back to work. I’m sure there were others like him who lived away from Atlanta but had to report there for duty.
 
—Bill
 


locked Re: Dining Car Crew Cycles

Steve Ellis
 

Were car attendants based in the same cities as dining car crews and did they have similar schedules?

On Tuesday, March 16, 2021, 10:51:58 AM EDT, Steve Ellis via groups.io <meadowbrookdairy@...> wrote:


Thank you very much. I really appreciate the information, Bill.

Steve Ellis

On Tuesday, March 16, 2021, 10:46:52 AM EDT, Bill Schafer <bill4501@...> wrote:


This is in reply to Steve Ellis's follow-up question about dining car crew bases other than Atlanta. I'm starting a new thread.

The November 20, 1970 timetable is the first that shows the
 Southern Crescent cut back to tri-weekly between Birmingham and New Orleans, so your trip on a daily Southern Crescent to New Orleans would have been one of the last (as opposed to a tri-weekly Southern Crescent). The daily service Atlanta-Bham continued into the Amtrak era, when it went to tri-weekly effective with the June 1, 1975 timetable. In the post-Amtrak period, the dining car didn’t operate beyond Atlanta; in fact, there was no food service Atlanta-Bham until May 1974, when SOU started offering food/beverage service in a “bar food car”, which photographic evidence suggests was one of the Crescent series sleeper-tavern-lounges.  
 
At one time, maybe as late as the 1960s, Southern dining car crews were based in Cincinnati, Chattanooga, and Washington (and maybe some other places, like Asheville) in addition to Atlanta. I don’t know what their work cycles were; that info is probably in the SRHA archives somewhere. I’m not aware that any full crews were based in New Orleans, at least by the 1950s or 1960s. 
 
During the post-Amtrak Southern Crescent era, I know of at least one steward, Steve Cosmos, who lived in Birmingham, but his crew base was Atlanta. He worked on one of the three long crews and had to deadhead or drive Birmingham-Atlanta to go on or off duty. Pre-Amtrak, Steve had been furloughed for years, but with the clustered retirements in the early-1970s, he was called back to work. I’m sure there were others like him who lived away from Atlanta but had to report there for duty.
 
—Bill
 


locked Re: Dining Car Crew Cycles

Steve Ellis
 

Thank you very much. I really appreciate the information, Bill.

Steve Ellis

On Tuesday, March 16, 2021, 10:46:52 AM EDT, Bill Schafer <bill4501@...> wrote:


This is in reply to Steve Ellis's follow-up question about dining car crew bases other than Atlanta. I'm starting a new thread.

The November 20, 1970 timetable is the first that shows the
 Southern Crescent cut back to tri-weekly between Birmingham and New Orleans, so your trip on a daily Southern Crescent to New Orleans would have been one of the last (as opposed to a tri-weekly Southern Crescent). The daily service Atlanta-Bham continued into the Amtrak era, when it went to tri-weekly effective with the June 1, 1975 timetable. In the post-Amtrak period, the dining car didn’t operate beyond Atlanta; in fact, there was no food service Atlanta-Bham until May 1974, when SOU started offering food/beverage service in a “bar food car”, which photographic evidence suggests was one of the Crescent series sleeper-tavern-lounges.  
 
At one time, maybe as late as the 1960s, Southern dining car crews were based in Cincinnati, Chattanooga, and Washington (and maybe some other places, like Asheville) in addition to Atlanta. I don’t know what their work cycles were; that info is probably in the SRHA archives somewhere. I’m not aware that any full crews were based in New Orleans, at least by the 1950s or 1960s. 
 
During the post-Amtrak Southern Crescent era, I know of at least one steward, Steve Cosmos, who lived in Birmingham, but his crew base was Atlanta. He worked on one of the three long crews and had to deadhead or drive Birmingham-Atlanta to go on or off duty. Pre-Amtrak, Steve had been furloughed for years, but with the clustered retirements in the early-1970s, he was called back to work. I’m sure there were others like him who lived away from Atlanta but had to report there for duty.
 
—Bill
 


locked Dining Car Crew Cycles

Bill Schafer
 

This is in reply to Steve Ellis's follow-up question about dining car crew bases other than Atlanta. I'm starting a new thread.

The November 20, 1970 timetable is the first that shows the
 Southern Crescent cut back to tri-weekly between Birmingham and New Orleans, so your trip on a daily Southern Crescent to New Orleans would have been one of the last (as opposed to a tri-weekly Southern Crescent). The daily service Atlanta-Bham continued into the Amtrak era, when it went to tri-weekly effective with the June 1, 1975 timetable. In the post-Amtrak period, the dining car didn’t operate beyond Atlanta; in fact, there was no food service Atlanta-Bham until May 1974, when SOU started offering food/beverage service in a “bar food car”, which photographic evidence suggests was one of the Crescent series sleeper-tavern-lounges.  
 
At one time, maybe as late as the 1960s, Southern dining car crews were based in Cincinnati, Chattanooga, and Washington (and maybe some other places, like Asheville) in addition to Atlanta. I don’t know what their work cycles were; that info is probably in the SRHA archives somewhere. I’m not aware that any full crews were based in New Orleans, at least by the 1950s or 1960s. 
 
During the post-Amtrak Southern Crescent era, I know of at least one steward, Steve Cosmos, who lived in Birmingham, but his crew base was Atlanta. He worked on one of the three long crews and had to deadhead or drive Birmingham-Atlanta to go on or off duty. Pre-Amtrak, Steve had been furloughed for years, but with the clustered retirements in the early-1970s, he was called back to work. I’m sure there were others like him who lived away from Atlanta but had to report there for duty.
 
—Bill
 


locked Re: Greensboro map was Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars

Steve Ellis
 

This is wonderful detail, Bill. When I rode the train in the fall of 1970, I know that was going to New Orleans on Saturdays. I believe it went all the way to New Orleans seven days a week, didn’t it?

Do you know if the crews were based in Atlanta in those days?


Steve Ellis




On Mar 16, 2021, at 9:59 AM, Bill Schafer <bill4501@...> wrote:

In the years of the post-Amtrak Southern Crescent, the dining and lounge car crews were based in Atlanta. The train ran overnight, every night Atlanta-Washington, and tri-weekly Atlanta-New Orleans. As far as the dining cars were concerned, there were five regular crews that ran on the following cycle (the “crew numbers" are not official; just as a reference):
 
Crew 1, Crew 2, Crew 3 - one long cycle per week, which consisted of going on duty in Atlanta with the fresh dining car, leaving on train 1 for New Orleans. The crew overnighted in New Orleans, worked through Atlanta on train 2 the next day, arriving Washington the next morning, and after an all-day layover, worked back overnight on train 1 to Atlanta. They were off for the rest of the week until their cycle began on the same day of the following week.
 
Crew 4, Crew 5 - two short cycles per week. These crews worked two Atlanta-Washington turn-around trips per week, leaving Atlanta on train 2, arriving Washington the next morning, working south from Washington on train 1 that evening, and arriving the next morning in Atlanta.
 
There was also a dining car extra board where people could fill in as needed for vacation or sick day relief, or be added when heavier passenger loadings were expected. 
 
Post-Amtrak, the tavern car only operated Atlanta-Washington, and I remember only two positions for that service, where the attendants made a turn-around trip every other day. There had to have been some provision for their relief somewhere along the line with an extra board attendant, but how it worked into the scheme escapes me at present. You could not put just anybody into that job - they had to have some experience keeping inventories and handling money, which was beyond the pay grade of a dining car waiter. IIRC, the position of the Southern Crescent’s lounge car attendant was a “waiter-in-charge”, which was the same position as the person in charge of a dinette-coach or a stripped down dining car with a two-man crew - a waiter-in-charge and a chef; no steward. 
 
—Bill
 


locked Re: Greensboro map was Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars

Bill Schafer
 

In the years of the post-Amtrak Southern Crescent, the dining and lounge car crews were based in Atlanta. The train ran overnight, every night Atlanta-Washington, and tri-weekly Atlanta-New Orleans. As far as the dining cars were concerned, there were five regular crews that ran on the following cycle (the “crew numbers" are not official; just as a reference):
 
Crew 1, Crew 2, Crew 3 - one long cycle per week, which consisted of going on duty in Atlanta with the fresh dining car, leaving on train 1 for New Orleans. The crew overnighted in New Orleans, worked through Atlanta on train 2 the next day, arriving Washington the next morning, and after an all-day layover, worked back overnight on train 1 to Atlanta. They were off for the rest of the week until their cycle began on the same day of the following week.
 
Crew 4, Crew 5 - two short cycles per week. These crews worked two Atlanta-Washington turn-around trips per week, leaving Atlanta on train 2, arriving Washington the next morning, working south from Washington on train 1 that evening, and arriving the next morning in Atlanta.
 
There was also a dining car extra board where people could fill in as needed for vacation or sick day relief, or be added when heavier passenger loadings were expected. 
 
Post-Amtrak, the tavern car only operated Atlanta-Washington, and I remember only two positions for that service, where the attendants made a turn-around trip every other day. There had to have been some provision for their relief somewhere along the line with an extra board attendant, but how it worked into the scheme escapes me at present. You could not put just anybody into that job - they had to have some experience keeping inventories and handling money, which was beyond the pay grade of a dining car waiter. IIRC, the position of the Southern Crescent’s lounge car attendant was a “waiter-in-charge”, which was the same position as the person in charge of a dinette-coach or a stripped down dining car with a two-man crew - a waiter-in-charge and a chef; no steward. 
 
—Bill
 


locked Re: Greensboro map was Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars

Steve Ellis
 

Were the crews on the Southern Crescent based out of New Orleans or Washington, or both?


On Mar 9, 2021, at 3:04 PM, Steve Ellis <meadowbrookdairy@...> wrote:


As I remember it, the attendants’ jackets did seem to look to be styled a little bit like a sports jacket or blazer, but without the lining or construction. They were also shorter, but I remember them having a button front and lapels.




On Mar 9, 2021, at 2:44 PM, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:


When office car NS-8 arrived at TVRM, I was looking in the closets and discovered several what I’d call “attendants’ jackets, soiled but in good condition. Someday, I expect they will find a new use in a museum display?

Ike

PS We are still looking for new trucks for Southern OC-21 circa 1956 (when it was converted at Hayne Shop). If anyone know of any that might be available, let me know at archives@....



On Mar 9, 2021, at 2:19 PM, Robert W. Grabarek, Jr. <grabarek@...> wrote:

The white jacket was normal attire for coach attendants.

Bob Grabarek

-----Original Message----- 
From: "Steve Ellis via groups.io" 
Sent: Mar 9, 2021 12:17 PM 
To: "main@SouthernRailway.groups.io" 
Subject: Re: Greensboro map was Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars 

Wonderful, thank you! 

 On my trip on the Southern from Washington to Atlanta and back in October of 1970, it seemed that even car attendants wore a white cotton 
jacket that looks like something a waiter would wear. Is that normal attire or was this person perhaps a member of the dining staff filling in for
the regular car attendant? 


On Tuesday, March 9, 2021, 11:42:52 AM EST, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:


In addition to hotels, many cities and large railroad facilities had either bunkhouses or YMCAs. (There are plans for several in the archives.) The question is….were they used by dining car staff? I suspect that was not common because dining cars were dropped and picked up by trains at various depots.

Ike

PS Here are two pages from the 7-31-57 dining car assignments.



On Mar 9, 2021, at 10:58 AM, Steve Ellis via groups.io <meadowbrookdairy@...> wrote:

I was wondering if the Southern Railway ever housed any of their employees in a hotel for an overnight stay. I know that Amtrak does this. Here in New York City, one of the car attendants on the Crescent told me that he spends the night in a hotel right across the street from Penn Station.


Employees on American trains are not away from home nearly as much as those on the Russian trains. In 2010 I fulfilled a dream I’ve had from childhood and rode the Trans-Siberian railroad from Moscow to Vladivostok, a journey of seven days.


On YouTube you can watch a video of a lady who is an attendant on this train. Every time she leaves home it is for two weeks. The train does not have showers, and they do not get a hotel when they get to Vladivostok, sleeping in the train instead.


I spoke to one lady who said that she did two round trips and was away from home for a month.


Steve Ellis,
Brooklyn New York




On Mar 9, 2021, at 10:42 AM, Graves, William W <wwg@...> wrote:


> Was this installation located on the military reservation shown on your Greensboro map?
 
While I did not recognize the picture, the Military Reservation shown on the map was definitely what was called the ORD section of Greensboro.  The picture could have been from the Pilot Life Campus that was mentioned in the wiki article as it had trees and while my time in Greensboro didn’t start until 1954, by then the ORD section was quite built up with small industrial buildings.
- Bill



locked Restoring passenger trains at the end of WWII

George Eichelberger
 

At the beginning of WWII, the Office of Defense Transportation ordered the discontinuation of many passenger trains where patronage did not justify the equipment or manpower needed to operate them. In many cases, the Southern accepted the Order as the opportunity to get rid of trains that State PUCs wanted to keep running. The ICC/ODT orders did not require PUC approvals.

As the War ended and the ODT orders were lifted, it was not unusual for the same PUCs to insist the trains be reestablished. Obviously if a railroad through a train should have been discontinued in 1941, it was unlikely it would be needed in 1949. The following 11-17-1949 memo is one of several examples in the SRHA archives that describe how the Southern was dealing with the issue.

Ike


locked Re: Southern Lantern Fuel

Bill Schafer
 

Fascinating tidbit, Scott - I never knew that. Thanks.

On Mar 12, 2021, at 18:35, D. Scott Chatfield <blindog@...> wrote:

Older lanterns burned animal oil, for several reasons.  The important reason for us collectors is the older glass can not take the heat of kerosene fire.  The demand for animal oil increased a great deal during the First World War, and the government asked the lantern makers to figure how to make their lanterns burn kerosene, which was becoming more plentiful by the day.  Corning Glass developed the first globes that could withstand kerosene, but it needed a smaller frame.  This drove the development of the "short globe" lanterns.  

So aside from the smell, kerosene might also break the globe.  Unless the word KERO is cast into the globe do not burn kerosene in it.

Scott Chatfield


locked Re: Southern Lantern Fuel

aramsay18
 

Wasn't whale oil also used in the early 1900's for lanterns?

Andy Ramsay
Berryville VA


On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 6:35 PM D. Scott Chatfield <blindog@...> wrote:
Older lanterns burned animal oil, for several reasons.  The important reason for us collectors is the older glass can not take the heat of kerosene fire.  The demand for animal oil increased a great deal during the First World War, and the government asked the lantern makers to figure how to make their lanterns burn kerosene, which was becoming more plentiful by the day.  Corning Glass developed the first globes that could withstand kerosene, but it needed a smaller frame.  This drove the development of the "short globe" lanterns.  

So aside from the smell, kerosene might also break the globe.  Unless the word KERO is cast into the globe do not burn kerosene in it.

Scott Chatfield


locked Re: Southern Lantern Fuel

D. Scott Chatfield
 

Older lanterns burned animal oil, for several reasons.  The important reason for us collectors is the older glass can not take the heat of kerosene fire.  The demand for animal oil increased a great deal during the First World War, and the government asked the lantern makers to figure how to make their lanterns burn kerosene, which was becoming more plentiful by the day.  Corning Glass developed the first globes that could withstand kerosene, but it needed a smaller frame.  This drove the development of the "short globe" lanterns.  

So aside from the smell, kerosene might also break the globe.  Unless the word KERO is cast into the globe do not burn kerosene in it.

Scott Chatfield


locked Re: Southern Lantern Fuel

Stephen Warner
 

While the roads used kerosene, use lamp oil.  I guarantee that if you burn kerosene at home, your wife, kids, dogs and cats will kick you out of the house - it smells and belongs in a depot or caboose.  Only problem with old lanterns is that there is kerosene residual that will smell half a century later, regardless of using newer lamp oil.


locked Re: Heater Car 50 at TVRM?

TIM ANDREWS
 

We called it the for firey dragon. I hated to start it so we could cool the 1208, but it was one of the things you had to do.


On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 12:11 PM, Charles Powell
<charlesspowell@...> wrote:
It was already in its "Tuxedo Black" paint scheme when it showed up at TVRM around 1969-1972. The car had water and diesel fuel tanks in each end of the car. It had a small Detroit Diesel engine-generator set for electrical power and two Vapor water tube boilers. It was a hot noisy place to be when everything was up and running.


locked Re: Southern Lantern Fuel

 

Now that’s an excellent story. I wish I could find a spot that sold them for four bucks a pop.



On Mar 12, 2021, at 9:12 AM, Felix Freeman <freeman.felix@...> wrote:


Anytime a locomotive consist is readied and offered for service there is a checklist of required supplies.  These requirements vary from railroad to railroad and have evolved over a period of time.  In the early 70s Pegram Shop was still in business and dispatching locomotives for the passenger trains.  One of the required items on each consist was a red globe kerosene lantern.   At that time I was recently hired and working there and decided that I needed one.  I found out that these lanterns were supplied and purchased from The Noland Company.  Noland was a hardware and industrial supply company.  Southern did a lot of business with these people over the years.  One day I had the opportunity to go to their place of business with the intent of purchasing one.  The salesman led me to a room where there was a huge pile of these lanterns.  He told me to take my pick and I bought one.  For $4.00.  I still have this.  It is my only Southern lantern.  Somewhere I still have my receipt. 

On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 7:55 AM Thunder via groups.io <t_pearson1212=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Lamp oil is the way to go. 

Do you have a pic of the lantern?

Todd P


On Mar 11, 2021, at 11:06 PM, D. Scott Chatfield <blindog@...> wrote:


What model and make is it?

I use regular lamp oil in my lanterns, not kerosene.  

Scott Chatfield



-------- Original message --------
From: Allen Cain <Allencaintn@...>
Date: 03/11/2021 11:27 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: "main@SouthernRailway.groups.io" <main@southernrailway.groups.io>
Subject: [SouthernRailway] Southern Lantern Fuel

I was lucky enough to buy a Southern Lantern which appears to have never been used (maybe it is a reproduction?) and would like to light it.

It is stamped with "Use Only Long Lasting Oil".

What is the correct fuel to use?  I was thinking kerosene but now not so sure.

Thanks,

Allen Cain

--
Allen Cain
Modeling the Southern in 1955 in HO Scale


locked Re: Heater Car 50 at TVRM?

Charles Powell
 

It was already in its "Tuxedo Black" paint scheme when it showed up at TVRM around 1969-1972. The car had water and diesel fuel tanks in each end of the car. It had a small Detroit Diesel engine-generator set for electrical power and two Vapor water tube boilers. It was a hot noisy place to be when everything was up and running.


locked Re: Heater Car 50 at TVRM?

Felix Freeman
 

I seem to recall that some of the retired "B" units in addition to being used as heater cars and mid train radio units were also used as scale test cars.  I think but am not sure that the one at Andover/Appalchia was used as a scale test car.  I photographed the one there and at that time it still had the nice brass EMC builder's plate attached.  

For a period of time a tourist/excursion railroad used a portion of the former Southern line out of Bristol to Gate City.  Among the equipment they had was a former Southern "B" unit. It was still in the Southern scheme when I photographed it at and stored at the end of the line.  I recall the location as being Mendota.

On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 10:25 AM Franklin Adams <fthedaddyof3@...> wrote:
Here are two from my negative collection.  Appalachia, VA September 1960


locked Re: Heater Car 50 at TVRM?

Franklin Adams
 

Here are two from my negative collection.  Appalachia, VA September 1960


locked Re: Southern Lantern Fuel

Felix Freeman
 

Anytime a locomotive consist is readied and offered for service there is a checklist of required supplies.  These requirements vary from railroad to railroad and have evolved over a period of time.  In the early 70s Pegram Shop was still in business and dispatching locomotives for the passenger trains.  One of the required items on each consist was a red globe kerosene lantern.   At that time I was recently hired and working there and decided that I needed one.  I found out that these lanterns were supplied and purchased from The Noland Company.  Noland was a hardware and industrial supply company.  Southern did a lot of business with these people over the years.  One day I had the opportunity to go to their place of business with the intent of purchasing one.  The salesman led me to a room where there was a huge pile of these lanterns.  He told me to take my pick and I bought one.  For $4.00.  I still have this.  It is my only Southern lantern.  Somewhere I still have my receipt. 


On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 7:55 AM Thunder via groups.io <t_pearson1212=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Lamp oil is the way to go. 

Do you have a pic of the lantern?

Todd P


On Mar 11, 2021, at 11:06 PM, D. Scott Chatfield <blindog@...> wrote:


What model and make is it?

I use regular lamp oil in my lanterns, not kerosene.  

Scott Chatfield



-------- Original message --------
From: Allen Cain <Allencaintn@...>
Date: 03/11/2021 11:27 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: "main@SouthernRailway.groups.io" <main@southernrailway.groups.io>
Subject: [SouthernRailway] Southern Lantern Fuel

I was lucky enough to buy a Southern Lantern which appears to have never been used (maybe it is a reproduction?) and would like to light it.

It is stamped with "Use Only Long Lasting Oil".

What is the correct fuel to use?  I was thinking kerosene but now not so sure.

Thanks,

Allen Cain

--
Allen Cain
Modeling the Southern in 1955 in HO Scale

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