Date   

locked Re: FM H24-66 Train Masters

Jim King
 

These are 2 images from ebay that I can readily access from my laptop … I have a 616 neg taken by the late Jack Hahn of an H24 in Louisville where they seemed to congregate, such as the roster shot under the coaling tower.  While the 2nd shot isn’t “on the road”, it is in an SD24 consist that appears to be in a yard.  Highly unlikely they ventured into Asheville but never say never!

 

I’ve yet to see a pic of an H24-66 that’s not in the middle of a consist.  The smaller H16-44s were used regularly on locals, sometimes alone, sometimes with a Geep or F.  Pix of those I’ve found indicate they ran in Indiana, KY and TN so I suspect FMs were grouped together on just a couple of divisions for maintenance reasons.

 

Here’s a link to Tom Daspit’s website … he shows pix of 6300-6304 plus a lot of H16s in case you have some of those.

 

http://southern.railfan.net/images/archive/southern/fm/fm.html

 

Jim King

http://smokymountainmodelworks.com/

 


locked Re: FM H24-66 Train Masters

C J Wyatt
 

Well, I have a mental picture. Unfortunately, I did not have a camera with me the times when I saw them (and I would have needed a telephoto lens anyhow). Circa '62 and on to the demise of the FM's, I did see and hear them occasionally on Southern Railway's Chattanooga-Atlanta line which ran by my school's property. Like most accounts from that time, they were in consist with SD24's. I had a reputation of looking out of the window rather than paying attention when a train came by.

Jack Wyatt


On Tuesday, November 9, 2021, 03:45:40 PM EST, Bill Schafer <bill4501@...> wrote:


Gary:

Personally, I have seen almost no pictures, color or otherwise, of SOU TrainMasters in service on road freights. Shots of them in engine terminals are more common.  

I was recently looking through scans of slides coming to the SRHA Archives from the late J. David Ingles estate and was surprised to find this interesting photo from December 1956 of a freight heading north on the CNO&TP at Boyce, Tenn. It is what I have heard called a “CNO&TP sandwich”, where SOU replaced two B-units with one or two TrainMasters. I also understand that once the SD24s arrived, SOU ran a couple TrainMasters between two SD24s on through freights. 

This doesn’t really answer your questions; I just thought the photo was cool. I’d also be interested to hear what answers others on this list can offer to your questions.

—Bill



On Nov 9, 2021, at 15:26, Gary Bechdol <garyeb1947@...> wrote:

Gentle beings

I recently acquired a Division Point SRR FM H24-66 Train Master model with the correct low end platforms.  The Withers Diesel book indicates that SRR acquired them to run between EMD F-units on the CNO&TP.  Am I correct in assuming that this was an early experiment in fuel saving?  Two 2400 hp Train Masters could replace three 1500 hp F b units.

Further questions:  On what other assignments were these units used?  Did they routinely operate as single units or in multiple with each other?  Did they stray off the CNO&TP to Atlanta, Birmingham, or Asheville?

Thanks in advance.

Gary Bechdol
Stone Mountain, GA


locked Re: FM H24-66 Train Masters

Robert Hanson
 

I've seen only one or two other photos and both showed the TM used as in the photo - one TM sandwiched between to EMDF units.

Bob Hanson
Loganville, GA


-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Schafer <bill4501@...>
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Nov 9, 2021 3:45 pm
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] FM H24-66 Train Masters

Gary:

Personally, I have seen almost no pictures, color or otherwise, of SOU TrainMasters in service on road freights. Shots of them in engine terminals are more common.  

I was recently looking through scans of slides coming to the SRHA Archives from the late J. David Ingles estate and was surprised to find this interesting photo from December 1956 of a freight heading north on the CNO&TP at Boyce, Tenn. It is what I have heard called a “CNO&TP sandwich”, where SOU replaced two B-units with one or two TrainMasters. I also understand that once the SD24s arrived, SOU ran a couple TrainMasters between two SD24s on through freights. 

This doesn’t really answer your questions; I just thought the photo was cool. I’d also be interested to hear what answers others on this list can offer to your questions.

—Bill



On Nov 9, 2021, at 15:26, Gary Bechdol <garyeb1947@...> wrote:

Gentle beings

I recently acquired a Division Point SRR FM H24-66 Train Master model with the correct low end platforms.  The Withers Diesel book indicates that SRR acquired them to run between EMD F-units on the CNO&TP.  Am I correct in assuming that this was an early experiment in fuel saving?  Two 2400 hp Train Masters could replace three 1500 hp F b units.

Further questions:  On what other assignments were these units used?  Did they routinely operate as single units or in multiple with each other?  Did they stray off the CNO&TP to Atlanta, Birmingham, or Asheville?

Thanks in advance.

Gary Bechdol
Stone Mountain, GA


locked Re: FM H24-66 Train Masters

Gary Bechdol
 

Thanks, Bill.

That's the only photo I've seen of a Train Master on the road.

Gary

On Tue, Nov 9, 2021 at 3:45 PM Bill Schafer <bill4501@...> wrote:
Gary:

Personally, I have seen almost no pictures, color or otherwise, of SOU TrainMasters in service on road freights. Shots of them in engine terminals are more common.  

I was recently looking through scans of slides coming to the SRHA Archives from the late J. David Ingles estate and was surprised to find this interesting photo from December 1956 of a freight heading north on the CNO&TP at Boyce, Tenn. It is what I have heard called a “CNO&TP sandwich”, where SOU replaced two B-units with one or two TrainMasters. I also understand that once the SD24s arrived, SOU ran a couple TrainMasters between two SD24s on through freights. 

This doesn’t really answer your questions; I just thought the photo was cool. I’d also be interested to hear what answers others on this list can offer to your questions.

—Bill



On Nov 9, 2021, at 15:26, Gary Bechdol <garyeb1947@...> wrote:

Gentle beings

I recently acquired a Division Point SRR FM H24-66 Train Master model with the correct low end platforms.  The Withers Diesel book indicates that SRR acquired them to run between EMD F-units on the CNO&TP.  Am I correct in assuming that this was an early experiment in fuel saving?  Two 2400 hp Train Masters could replace three 1500 hp F b units.

Further questions:  On what other assignments were these units used?  Did they routinely operate as single units or in multiple with each other?  Did they stray off the CNO&TP to Atlanta, Birmingham, or Asheville?

Thanks in advance.

Gary Bechdol
Stone Mountain, GA


locked Re: FM H24-66 Train Masters

Bill Schafer
 

Gary:

Personally, I have seen almost no pictures, color or otherwise, of SOU TrainMasters in service on road freights. Shots of them in engine terminals are more common.  

I was recently looking through scans of slides coming to the SRHA Archives from the late J. David Ingles estate and was surprised to find this interesting photo from December 1956 of a freight heading north on the CNO&TP at Boyce, Tenn. It is what I have heard called a “CNO&TP sandwich”, where SOU replaced two B-units with one or two TrainMasters. I also understand that once the SD24s arrived, SOU ran a couple TrainMasters between two SD24s on through freights. 

This doesn’t really answer your questions; I just thought the photo was cool. I’d also be interested to hear what answers others on this list can offer to your questions.

—Bill



On Nov 9, 2021, at 15:26, Gary Bechdol <garyeb1947@...> wrote:

Gentle beings

I recently acquired a Division Point SRR FM H24-66 Train Master model with the correct low end platforms.  The Withers Diesel book indicates that SRR acquired them to run between EMD F-units on the CNO&TP.  Am I correct in assuming that this was an early experiment in fuel saving?  Two 2400 hp Train Masters could replace three 1500 hp F b units.

Further questions:  On what other assignments were these units used?  Did they routinely operate as single units or in multiple with each other?  Did they stray off the CNO&TP to Atlanta, Birmingham, or Asheville?

Thanks in advance.

Gary Bechdol
Stone Mountain, GA


locked FM H24-66 Train Masters

Gary Bechdol
 

Gentle beings

I recently acquired a Division Point SRR FM H24-66 Train Master model with the correct low end platforms.  The Withers Diesel book indicates that SRR acquired them to run between EMD F-units on the CNO&TP.  Am I correct in assuming that this was an early experiment in fuel saving?  Two 2400 hp Train Masters could replace three 1500 hp F b units.

Further questions:  On what other assignments were these units used?  Did they routinely operate as single units or in multiple with each other?  Did they stray off the CNO&TP to Atlanta, Birmingham, or Asheville?

Thanks in advance.

Gary Bechdol
Stone Mountain, GA


locked Re: Empty refrigerator car return instructions - 1955

George Eichelberger
 

Andy:

Attached…

Ike



On Nov 7, 2021, at 10:36 PM, aramsay18 <aramsay37@...> wrote:

Hello Ike

Please send pages 2 and 3

Thanks in advance

Best Regards from Berryville VA
Andy Ramsay 


On Sun, Nov 7, 2021, 5:46 PM George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:
From the SRHA archives, Hayne Shop files, I've attached the first of three-page of routing instructions for empty refrigerator cars for the Southern Rwy. in 1955. (I will forward or post Pgs 2 and 3 if there is any interest.)

While it only refers to empty cars on the Southern, it would be very interesting to find/see similar documents for other roads, particularly the ACL, SAL, L&N, FEC and other eastern or southeastern roads. Is anyone aware of such documentation?

Ike

PS Several of us will be working in the archives Mon-Wed in advance of the November work session. If anyone is in the area those days, stop by the archive building on Turntable Road at TVRM. (Send me an email archives@... beforehand to make sure plans have not changed.)




locked Re: Empty refrigerator car return instructions - 1955

aramsay18
 

Hello Ike

Please send pages 2 and 3

Thanks in advance

Best Regards from Berryville VA
Andy Ramsay 


On Sun, Nov 7, 2021, 5:46 PM George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:
From the SRHA archives, Hayne Shop files, I've attached the first of three-page of routing instructions for empty refrigerator cars for the Southern Rwy. in 1955. (I will forward or post Pgs 2 and 3 if there is any interest.)

While it only refers to empty cars on the Southern, it would be very interesting to find/see similar documents for other roads, particularly the ACL, SAL, L&N, FEC and other eastern or southeastern roads. Is anyone aware of such documentation?

Ike

PS Several of us will be working in the archives Mon-Wed in advance of the November work session. If anyone is in the area those days, stop by the archive building on Turntable Road at TVRM. (Send me an email archives@... beforehand to make sure plans have not changed.)


locked Re: 44 Tonner painting and lettering

Allen Cain
 

I would appreciate getting the same info!

Allen Cain
Modeling the Southern in 1955 in HO
--
Allen Cain
Chem-Dry of Brentwood
Chem-Dry of Franklin
Mr. B's Chem-Dry
Bluff City Chem-Dry
Chem-Dry of De Soto County
Divisions of New Horizons Enterprises Inc

--
Allen Cain
Modeling the Southern in 1955 in HO Scale


locked Re: 44 Tonner painting and lettering

Sam Smith
 

David,

I forgot to mention, because they were not all built at the same time frame, there were some external or visual differences. The most notable is the presence of, or lack of radiator louvers on the ends. Some had a row off louvers on the sides instead of the ends.

When I have time this weekend, I will get you some more specific information.

Samuel Smith


On Wed, Nov 3, 2021 at 8:26 AM, David Eisman
<davideisman@...> wrote:
Thanks very much for your reply. I’m working on a large model project 44 Tonner for 7.5 inch gauge track.  All infos and photos are appreciated !
Thanks again,
David Eisman 


On Nov 2, 2021, at 7:38 PM, Sam Smith via groups.io <sam_smith2004@...> wrote:

David,

I don't have my reference material in front of me right now, but I can provide you the following.
There is not a quick easy answer to your question. The 44 Tonners were not all built at the same time, nor were they all built originally for the Southern. Quite a few of them were acquired when the Southern bought up smaller railroads, such as the Atlantic and East Carolina Railway. The A.&E.C. had at least 2 of these 44 Tonners that were delivered painted in their own colors when new. Then there was one unit, I believe #1955, which was retired and sold while still in the Southern's green scheme. 
As far as their use, they were primarily used on branches that had extremely light weight rail. Probably rail/track that had not been upgraded since the turn of the century.....the last one, not this one....😁

Hope this helps a little,
Samuel Smith
Moultrie, Ga



locked Re: 44 Tonner painting and lettering

David Eisman
 

Thanks very much for your reply. I’m working on a large model project 44 Tonner for 7.5 inch gauge track.  All infos and photos are appreciated !
Thanks again,
David Eisman 


On Nov 2, 2021, at 7:38 PM, Sam Smith via groups.io <sam_smith2004@...> wrote:

David,

I don't have my reference material in front of me right now, but I can provide you the following.
There is not a quick easy answer to your question. The 44 Tonners were not all built at the same time, nor were they all built originally for the Southern. Quite a few of them were acquired when the Southern bought up smaller railroads, such as the Atlantic and East Carolina Railway. The A.&E.C. had at least 2 of these 44 Tonners that were delivered painted in their own colors when new. Then there was one unit, I believe #1955, which was retired and sold while still in the Southern's green scheme. 
As far as their use, they were primarily used on branches that had extremely light weight rail. Probably rail/track that had not been upgraded since the turn of the century.....the last one, not this one....😁

Hope this helps a little,
Samuel Smith
Moultrie, Ga


locked Re: 44 Tonner painting and lettering

Sam Smith
 

David,

I don't have my reference material in front of me right now, but I can provide you the following.
There is not a quick easy answer to your question. The 44 Tonners were not all built at the same time, nor were they all built originally for the Southern. Quite a few of them were acquired when the Southern bought up smaller railroads, such as the Atlantic and East Carolina Railway. The A.&E.C. had at least 2 of these 44 Tonners that were delivered painted in their own colors when new. Then there was one unit, I believe #1955, which was retired and sold while still in the Southern's green scheme. 
As far as their use, they were primarily used on branches that had extremely light weight rail. Probably rail/track that had not been upgraded since the turn of the century.....the last one, not this one....😁

Hope this helps a little,
Samuel Smith
Moultrie, Ga


locked 44 Tonner painting and lettering

David Eisman
 

I’m looking for color photos and detailed drawings of Southern’s 44 Tonner locomotives in green paint with the large round SR logo on the side.  I’m particularly interested in the history of their painting and lettering. Were they originally painted black or green and when did the large round SR logo begin to be applied to these locomotives as they were originally delivered in the early 1940s without the logo and were lettered simply  “southern “ .  Additional info on the use of the 44 Tonner on the Southern would also be greatly appreciated.
Thank You 
David Eisman


locked Progress Thumbnails from Full Size Drawing Scans to date

George Eichelberger
 

We have mentioned, and quite a few people have seen, how many original and blueprint drawings we have in the SRHA archives. Although a great many of the General Arrangement and larger size details drawings have been scanned from a combination of microfilm and hard copy drawings, we want to improve the quality (and use) of our digital files by using the new 48” scanner to scan as many originals, full size, as manpower allows. At this point, we are scanning mostly “D” size original linens (“SF” prefix freight car drawings to start).

As time permits, we will scan all of our original drawings, from “D” to “A” sizes. When that project gets done, we can make individual drawings available for sale on request. If anyone is interested in helping, they can come to any of our third-weekend work sessions at the archives building at TVRM. Contact archives@... if you are interested in helping with scanning or making donations toward the $7,000+ cost of the new scanner.

The Google Drive link that follows includes a folder with 27 pages of thumbnails. While there are literally thousands of drawing scans are in digital files, these thumbnails show only the full, D size scans done so far.

To help identify and organize all of our scans, several people have offered to create spreadsheet versions of the Southern’s drawing indexes (Card Lists). The card lists shows every drawing for a particular Specification(s) and car number series. Having those references for both freight and passenger car drawings will allow us to find all drawings for those cars. That is very (!) useful because many drawings do NOT show what cars they were used on. Trying to determine that (with out indexes) is made more difficult because many drawings were used on many cars series (think standard trucks and couplers) and some drawings were prepared by the Southern or the carbuilders to specify/sell cars that were either never purchased or used different drawings for their production.

Note that some of the file names are particularly long and appear rather cryptic), the scan file name for drawing SF-1002, for example, shows:

SF-1002F Std Plain Box Car 60,000 Lbs Capy 8-10-1904 CL F-14 & F-22 Specs F26 & F-26A

The “F” following the Southern drawing name identifies this as a “full size” scan. For a D size drawing at 200 or 300 dpi, that is typically a 200MB file. (unless we have a need, or someone wants, a full size copy, we will use reduced size drawings, typically tabloid 11”x17” that we can print easily and are much easier to handle that 5’ or larger full size reproductions. (The purchase of a large plotter is under consideration if/when funds are available…$ donations are needed first)

When known, car series numbers are included in the file name, the Specifications (Specs) and Card Lists (CL) that reference that drawing follow. (That data is temporarily in the filenames, it will be eventually be. moved into each scans “IPTC” meta data.

The download is not large, the thumbnail images can be expanded somewhat…..comments are welcome. (Note that is represent only a very small percentage of the Southern and Central of Georgia drawing is the collection.)


Ike


locked Re: Today's Question

Allen Cain
 

Interesting that there are steam coils on the left side of the building layout view.  Could this have been an early "co-generation" tool to recover some of the waste heat from the burning of whatever was being burned?  Not enough resolution to make out some of the details.
--
Allen Cain
Modeling the Southern in 1955 in HO Scale


locked Re: Today's Question

George Eichelberger
 

Bill and All:

So far, I think I have identified crematoriums at major livestock in-transit feed and watering points: in addition to Spencer…John Sevier in Knoxville and Atlanta.

Nothing (so far) at Birmingham or any of the Southern “gateway” terminals; NOLA, Jacksonville, Cincinnati, Louisville or Portsmouth. A review of the ICC filings for all of those locations might provide specific information. Although I have never seen a comprehensive list, I have been surprised at how many cities, towns and small towns had stock loading facilities. Moving cattle, sheep, hogs, horses and mules was big business for the Southern even considering that animal deaths in-transit were a significant claim expense. There are letters and telegrams in the Presidents’ files that discuss the need for more inspection of animals before they were loaded because shippers would load sick animals knowing they would probably not survive the trip and would be paid for by the railroad.

Large shipments of horses and mules were common until the early 1920s, most went to Pinners point for export to Spain or Germany although loads also were interchanged at Pot Yard for ports farther north. (note the attached 10-11-1921 telegram to Fairfax Harrison from E.L. Gatewood. Gatewood apparently “sold” himself as an expert on shipping animals, FFH made him “Executive General Agent” for livestock marketing.) The loads of mules typically came from, or through, St. Louis.

The archives contain a number of photos of livestock facilities and a few drawings. I’m sure the subject is “new” to almost every one so research and a TIES article are open to anyone interested.

Ike

PS An oddity about Southern stock cars I do not understand….when “DWB” was President, the newest group of Southern stock cars were ready for retirement, possibly to be rebuilt as box cars. We have a memo from Brosnan saying he expected the business to increase and none of the cars were to be scrapped. Nothing else has been found that explains what he had in mind? (BTW…Of course, the SRHA archives contain original linen drawings of every (!) Southern stock car. A “mystery” (to me anyway) is that at least one group of drawings is labeled “horse and mule car” but I can not find any differences between them and standard “stock” cars. (Although I guess chickens could be call “stock”, I have not included them here, we have multiple classes of “poultry cars=“ drawings.)

PPS I thought the “crematoriums” topic may be of interest to the list. Let me know if there is interest in the “odd and unusual” material in the archives. When we start to publish the “Southern News Bulletin” the months TIES is not published we will include this type of material…but it will only go to SRHA members!


On Oct 29, 2021, at 9:32 PM, Bill Schafer <bill4501@...> wrote:

Livestock deaths in transit were not unusual, especially before federal regulations specifying that livestock be rested and watered every 28 hours. At major yards my guess is that it would have been the practice to cull dead animals from the stock cars en route. Livestock movements were frequently (usually? always?) accompanied by drovers, whose job was to make sure the animals were cared for and if they weren’t, to be able to tell the owners how and why any of the stock perished so claims could be lodged against the carriers. Much of this information comes from an excellent exhibit on livestock transportation at the Illinois Railway Museum in Union, Ill. The exhibit is in an ATSF stock car. 

Disposing of the manure that would have accumulated may have been the job of the drovers; if there was enough bedding in the cars, maybe it wasn’t cleaned out at all. Regardless, I doubt if the railroad would have gone to the expense of incinerating it. Back at the turn of the 19th-20th century, most Americans lived in the country or small towns, so piles of manure here and there would have been no big deal. In my time, I’m remembering how the railroad used to dispose of the residue from cleaned out boxcars - before the days of eco-sensitivity, it was just amassed in a big pile somewhere. 

Dead animals are different, though. They attract scavengers, pests and disease, and even 120 years ago, dead animals were moved from where people lived and worked. The most efficient method of disposal would be cremation, I would think, if a rendering company was not nearby. Death could have been caused by trampling, train handling, disease, accidents, starvation/thirst, . . . any number of reasons. Hence, the crematorium. 

Much of the above is a hunch - I grew up on a farm around large animals that once in a while died. If that happened, we called a knacker who worked for the Leidy chemical company, who would winch the carcass onto a flatbed truck and haul it off to the rendering plant. There, the body would be “rendered” and many parts of the animal salvaged. Southern may have cremated the animals because no rendering plants were in the vicinity. It would be interesting to find a reference that lists where the crematoriums were on the Southern. Would Spencer be the only location, systemwide? 

—Bill







On Oct 29, 2021, at 17:09, Charles Powell <charlesspowell@...> wrote:

Looks like the drawing dates to the 1890s. Railroads hauled a lot of livestock in those days and eventually those stock cars would end up with a lot of you know what on the floors. Maybe this was where the livestock waste was disposed? Just guessing. I looked in online dictionaries to see if crematory or cremation had earlier uses and most places defined them connected with disposal of bodies. One of the sites did show cremate as a synonym for incineration in general. 

Charlie Powell



locked Re: Today's Question

Bill Schafer
 

Livestock deaths in transit were not unusual, especially before federal regulations specifying that livestock be rested and watered every 28 hours. At major yards my guess is that it would have been the practice to cull dead animals from the stock cars en route. Livestock movements were frequently (usually? always?) accompanied by drovers, whose job was to make sure the animals were cared for and if they weren’t, to be able to tell the owners how and why any of the stock perished so claims could be lodged against the carriers. Much of this information comes from an excellent exhibit on livestock transportation at the Illinois Railway Museum in Union, Ill. The exhibit is in an ATSF stock car. 

Disposing of the manure that would have accumulated may have been the job of the drovers; if there was enough bedding in the cars, maybe it wasn’t cleaned out at all. Regardless, I doubt if the railroad would have gone to the expense of incinerating it. Back at the turn of the 19th-20th century, most Americans lived in the country or small towns, so piles of manure here and there would have been no big deal. In my time, I’m remembering how the railroad used to dispose of the residue from cleaned out boxcars - before the days of eco-sensitivity, it was just amassed in a big pile somewhere. 

Dead animals are different, though. They attract scavengers, pests and disease, and even 120 years ago, dead animals were moved from where people lived and worked. The most efficient method of disposal would be cremation, I would think, if a rendering company was not nearby. Death could have been caused by trampling, train handling, disease, accidents, starvation/thirst, . . . any number of reasons. Hence, the crematorium. 

Much of the above is a hunch - I grew up on a farm around large animals that once in a while died. If that happened, we called a knacker who worked for the Leidy chemical company, who would winch the carcass onto a flatbed truck and haul it off to the rendering plant. There, the body would be “rendered” and many parts of the animal salvaged. Southern may have cremated the animals because no rendering plants were in the vicinity. It would be interesting to find a reference that lists where the crematoriums were on the Southern. Would Spencer be the only location, systemwide? 

—Bill







On Oct 29, 2021, at 17:09, Charles Powell <charlesspowell@...> wrote:

Looks like the drawing dates to the 1890s. Railroads hauled a lot of livestock in those days and eventually those stock cars would end up with a lot of you know what on the floors. Maybe this was where the livestock waste was disposed? Just guessing. I looked in online dictionaries to see if crematory or cremation had earlier uses and most places defined them connected with disposal of bodies. One of the sites did show cremate as a synonym for incineration in general. 

Charlie Powell


locked Re: Today's Question

Charles Powell
 

Looks like the drawing dates to the 1890s. Railroads hauled a lot of livestock in those days and eventually those stock cars would end up with a lot of you know what on the floors. Maybe this was where the livestock waste was disposed? Just guessing. I looked in online dictionaries to see if crematory or cremation had earlier uses and most places defined them connected with disposal of bodies. One of the sites did show cremate as a synonym for incineration in general. 

Charlie Powell


locked Re: Today's Question

Robert Hanson
 

Southern Railway - Service You Can't Refuse


-----Original Message-----
From: George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...>
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Oct 29, 2021 3:15 pm
Subject: [SouthernRailway] Today's Question

Two questions for the attached drawing…

A.) why would the Southern have such a facility?

B.) how many were there and where were they?

Ike


locked Re: Today's Question

C J Wyatt
 

Perhaps for animals killed by its trains.

Jack Wyatt

On Friday, October 29, 2021, 03:15:53 PM EDT, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:


Two questions for the attached drawing…

A.) why would the Southern have such a facility?

B.) how many were there and where were they?

Ike

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