Date   

locked Re: Cleaning out the accounting books

D. Scott Chatfield
 

Sometimes, an entry in the SR records will say something like "car interchanged to Mexico, never returned" ....

I recall a memo that listed the groups of Southern cars that were not to be loaded to consignees in Mexico.  Basically, all of our aluminum cars.  The fear was we would not get the car back.  Metal thieves would cut it up on sight.  I was told that was a big reason why the roof-hatch boxcars were kept in service so long, for loading to Mexico.

Baseless fear?  I don't think so.  When I was doing civil work for BN in the mid '90s they started buying thousands of 4750cf grain hoppers from Trinity, all with fancy new aluminum roof hatches.  They sent a trainload of grain to Mexico in these new cars.  They came back hatchless.


Scott Chatfield


locked Re: Cleaning out the accounting books

Bill Schafer
 

Rick:

Those who live in glass houses . . .😜

—Bill


Another iPhone-generated message

On Dec 23, 2019, at 14:23, rwbrv4 via Groups.Io <Rwbrv4@...> wrote:

Oh my, I just realized that went out to a group, and not the SRHA group.
Sorry folks.
Rick


-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Schafer <bill4501@...>
To: main <main@southernrailway.groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Dec 23, 2019 2:20 pm
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Cleaning out the accounting books

Excellent explanation. I expect those wood boxcars were nearly all ghosts. I remember when I was in the training program in Greensboro the mechanical Dept used a wood boxcar - sans trucks, in the weeds behind the rip track - as a storage room. The genl fman told me it had been years since he had seen one in service, MOOW. That was 1971. 

—Bill


Another iPhone-generated message

On Dec 23, 2019, at 13:08, Kevin Centers <klcenters@...> wrote:

Ike

We refer to cars that still have an accounting record but do not physically exist as ghost cars.  They have soul, but their mortal bodies have left this earth. Movement records are generally researched by Mechanical and Equipment Planning, and if a car is found to not be moving, field personnel try to find it. If it can’t be found it is recommended for retirement as a ghost. 
To do a little more of a dive into boring accounting, Capital Accounting processes the retirements without salvage.  As you may or may not be aware, under group depreciation, an asset generates depreciation expense until it is retired, regardless of its intended life. As a result, it is important to get non-existent assets off the books to avoid overstating expenses and understating net income. This situation can also cause some concern during depreciation study time if there is a large number of ghosts. Fortunately, we only have a handful nowadays. During the Conrail acquisition, though, it was very common to see large numbers of cars being retired as ghosts since CR’s records weren’t that good at times. 

Kevin

On Dec 23, 2019, at 12:16 PM, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

The project to record data on Southern Railway rolling stock has been continuing for more than 20 years. The project's spread sheets include more than 300,000 entries (when cars and locos were acquired, rebuilt, modified and scrapped). Sometimes, an entry in the SR records will say something like "car interchanged to Mexico, never returned" other entries will have no idea what became of the equipment.

We recently found information on thousands more freight and passenger car dispositions (approvals to retire and scrap) in Presidents' file boxes 579 and 580. A July 10, 1972 memo to Graham Claytor recommending retirement for 31 40-ton wood sheathed box cars (attached) is unusual. The Southern accounting or audit folks must have wanted to clear their books?

Ike
<1972-7-10 31 40T wood sheathed box cars cars recommended for reirement _cannot be found_ Pg 1.jpg>


locked Re: Cleaning out the accounting books

rwbrv4
 

Oh my, I just realized that went out to a group, and not the SRHA group.
Sorry folks.
Rick


-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Schafer <bill4501@...>
To: main <main@southernrailway.groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Dec 23, 2019 2:20 pm
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Cleaning out the accounting books

Excellent explanation. I expect those wood boxcars were nearly all ghosts. I remember when I was in the training program in Greensboro the mechanical Dept used a wood boxcar - sans trucks, in the weeds behind the rip track - as a storage room. The genl fman told me it had been years since he had seen one in service, MOOW. That was 1971. 

—Bill


Another iPhone-generated message

On Dec 23, 2019, at 13:08, Kevin Centers <klcenters@...> wrote:

Ike

We refer to cars that still have an accounting record but do not physically exist as ghost cars.  They have soul, but their mortal bodies have left this earth. Movement records are generally researched by Mechanical and Equipment Planning, and if a car is found to not be moving, field personnel try to find it. If it can’t be found it is recommended for retirement as a ghost. 
To do a little more of a dive into boring accounting, Capital Accounting processes the retirements without salvage.  As you may or may not be aware, under group depreciation, an asset generates depreciation expense until it is retired, regardless of its intended life. As a result, it is important to get non-existent assets off the books to avoid overstating expenses and understating net income. This situation can also cause some concern during depreciation study time if there is a large number of ghosts. Fortunately, we only have a handful nowadays. During the Conrail acquisition, though, it was very common to see large numbers of cars being retired as ghosts since CR’s records weren’t that good at times. 

Kevin

On Dec 23, 2019, at 12:16 PM, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

The project to record data on Southern Railway rolling stock has been continuing for more than 20 years. The project's spread sheets include more than 300,000 entries (when cars and locos were acquired, rebuilt, modified and scrapped). Sometimes, an entry in the SR records will say something like "car interchanged to Mexico, never returned" other entries will have no idea what became of the equipment.

We recently found information on thousands more freight and passenger car dispositions (approvals to retire and scrap) in Presidents' file boxes 579 and 580. A July 10, 1972 memo to Graham Claytor recommending retirement for 31 40-ton wood sheathed box cars (attached) is unusual. The Southern accounting or audit folks must have wanted to clear their books?

Ike
<1972-7-10 31 40T wood sheathed box cars cars recommended for reirement _cannot be found_ Pg 1.jpg>


locked Re: Cleaning out the accounting books

rwbrv4
 

Wow, Bill, 1971....as my neighbor's kid says, "wow dude, you're an old fart".
Rick


-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Schafer <bill4501@...>
To: main <main@southernrailway.groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Dec 23, 2019 2:20 pm
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Cleaning out the accounting books

Excellent explanation. I expect those wood boxcars were nearly all ghosts. I remember when I was in the training program in Greensboro the mechanical Dept used a wood boxcar - sans trucks, in the weeds behind the rip track - as a storage room. The genl fman told me it had been years since he had seen one in service, MOOW. That was 1971. 

—Bill


Another iPhone-generated message

On Dec 23, 2019, at 13:08, Kevin Centers <klcenters@...> wrote:

Ike

We refer to cars that still have an accounting record but do not physically exist as ghost cars.  They have soul, but their mortal bodies have left this earth. Movement records are generally researched by Mechanical and Equipment Planning, and if a car is found to not be moving, field personnel try to find it. If it can’t be found it is recommended for retirement as a ghost. 
To do a little more of a dive into boring accounting, Capital Accounting processes the retirements without salvage.  As you may or may not be aware, under group depreciation, an asset generates depreciation expense until it is retired, regardless of its intended life. As a result, it is important to get non-existent assets off the books to avoid overstating expenses and understating net income. This situation can also cause some concern during depreciation study time if there is a large number of ghosts. Fortunately, we only have a handful nowadays. During the Conrail acquisition, though, it was very common to see large numbers of cars being retired as ghosts since CR’s records weren’t that good at times. 

Kevin

On Dec 23, 2019, at 12:16 PM, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

The project to record data on Southern Railway rolling stock has been continuing for more than 20 years. The project's spread sheets include more than 300,000 entries (when cars and locos were acquired, rebuilt, modified and scrapped). Sometimes, an entry in the SR records will say something like "car interchanged to Mexico, never returned" other entries will have no idea what became of the equipment.

We recently found information on thousands more freight and passenger car dispositions (approvals to retire and scrap) in Presidents' file boxes 579 and 580. A July 10, 1972 memo to Graham Claytor recommending retirement for 31 40-ton wood sheathed box cars (attached) is unusual. The Southern accounting or audit folks must have wanted to clear their books?

Ike
<1972-7-10 31 40T wood sheathed box cars cars recommended for reirement _cannot be found_ Pg 1.jpg>


locked Re: Cleaning out the accounting books

Bill Schafer
 

Excellent explanation. I expect those wood boxcars were nearly all ghosts. I remember when I was in the training program in Greensboro the mechanical Dept used a wood boxcar - sans trucks, in the weeds behind the rip track - as a storage room. The genl fman told me it had been years since he had seen one in service, MOOW. That was 1971. 

—Bill


Another iPhone-generated message

On Dec 23, 2019, at 13:08, Kevin Centers <klcenters@...> wrote:

Ike

We refer to cars that still have an accounting record but do not physically exist as ghost cars.  They have soul, but their mortal bodies have left this earth. Movement records are generally researched by Mechanical and Equipment Planning, and if a car is found to not be moving, field personnel try to find it. If it can’t be found it is recommended for retirement as a ghost. 
To do a little more of a dive into boring accounting, Capital Accounting processes the retirements without salvage.  As you may or may not be aware, under group depreciation, an asset generates depreciation expense until it is retired, regardless of its intended life. As a result, it is important to get non-existent assets off the books to avoid overstating expenses and understating net income. This situation can also cause some concern during depreciation study time if there is a large number of ghosts. Fortunately, we only have a handful nowadays. During the Conrail acquisition, though, it was very common to see large numbers of cars being retired as ghosts since CR’s records weren’t that good at times. 

Kevin

On Dec 23, 2019, at 12:16 PM, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

The project to record data on Southern Railway rolling stock has been continuing for more than 20 years. The project's spread sheets include more than 300,000 entries (when cars and locos were acquired, rebuilt, modified and scrapped). Sometimes, an entry in the SR records will say something like "car interchanged to Mexico, never returned" other entries will have no idea what became of the equipment.

We recently found information on thousands more freight and passenger car dispositions (approvals to retire and scrap) in Presidents' file boxes 579 and 580. A July 10, 1972 memo to Graham Claytor recommending retirement for 31 40-ton wood sheathed box cars (attached) is unusual. The Southern accounting or audit folks must have wanted to clear their books?

Ike
<1972-7-10 31 40T wood sheathed box cars cars recommended for reirement _cannot be found_ Pg 1.jpg>


locked Re: Cleaning out the accounting books

Kevin Centers
 

Ike

We refer to cars that still have an accounting record but do not physically exist as ghost cars.  They have soul, but their mortal bodies have left this earth. Movement records are generally researched by Mechanical and Equipment Planning, and if a car is found to not be moving, field personnel try to find it. If it can’t be found it is recommended for retirement as a ghost. 
To do a little more of a dive into boring accounting, Capital Accounting processes the retirements without salvage.  As you may or may not be aware, under group depreciation, an asset generates depreciation expense until it is retired, regardless of its intended life. As a result, it is important to get non-existent assets off the books to avoid overstating expenses and understating net income. This situation can also cause some concern during depreciation study time if there is a large number of ghosts. Fortunately, we only have a handful nowadays. During the Conrail acquisition, though, it was very common to see large numbers of cars being retired as ghosts since CR’s records weren’t that good at times. 

Kevin

On Dec 23, 2019, at 12:16 PM, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

The project to record data on Southern Railway rolling stock has been continuing for more than 20 years. The project's spread sheets include more than 300,000 entries (when cars and locos were acquired, rebuilt, modified and scrapped). Sometimes, an entry in the SR records will say something like "car interchanged to Mexico, never returned" other entries will have no idea what became of the equipment.

We recently found information on thousands more freight and passenger car dispositions (approvals to retire and scrap) in Presidents' file boxes 579 and 580. A July 10, 1972 memo to Graham Claytor recommending retirement for 31 40-ton wood sheathed box cars (attached) is unusual. The Southern accounting or audit folks must have wanted to clear their books?

Ike
<1972-7-10 31 40T wood sheathed box cars cars recommended for reirement _cannot be found_ Pg 1.jpg>


locked Cleaning out the accounting books

George Eichelberger
 

The project to record data on Southern Railway rolling stock has been continuing for more than 20 years. The project's spread sheets include more than 300,000 entries (when cars and locos were acquired, rebuilt, modified and scrapped). Sometimes, an entry in the SR records will say something like "car interchanged to Mexico, never returned" other entries will have no idea what became of the equipment.

We recently found information on thousands more freight and passenger car dispositions (approvals to retire and scrap) in Presidents' file boxes 579 and 580. A July 10, 1972 memo to Graham Claytor recommending retirement for 31 40-ton wood sheathed box cars (attached) is unusual. The Southern accounting or audit folks must have wanted to clear their books?

Ike


locked Piggyback information in the SRHA archives

George Eichelberger
 

As I have mentioned before (sorry to be repetitive...), the Southern Railway Presidents' files are a treasure trove of information about any subject that would involve the President. The files we are finding to be particularly interesting are the ones that reach back to the very beginning of major projects and business issues, without a doubt "Piggyback" being huge.

Although scanning files is limited because of other projects, as topics that may become articles in TIES Magazine, useful in the series of SRHA rolling stock books or simply important for research, are located SRHA's digital files* are growing as fast as they can be scanned.

I have attached one example, a July 20, 1959 letter from the PRR to the Southern saying they will establish piggyback service to Potomac Yard in 90 days. It is one of many items in archives Box 545, File 10,765, and others, discussing the beginning of TOFC services.

Ike

PS We are considering organizing some "super work sessions" in the archives in 2020. By "super", they will be for more than two days, include multiple projects and will make time for presentations and discussions on various topics. If anyone is interested in the concept, please send an email to archives@....


locked Re: Samuel Spencer

Cohen Bob
 

Regarding paranormal sightings and such:

While I believe that such things may in fact exist, there usually is a "reason" for their appearance at a location, like the person died there or met an untimely end at that locale. I have never personally experienced such things, but there's always a first time.

Spencer did meet an untimely (and unexpected) end but it was in a lonely little spot about 10 or 12 miles south of Lynchburg, Virginia and nowhere near his happy hunting grounds in Georgia. However, if he just plays tricks at Jekyll Island, maybe that tells us a little about his personality.

Hey, I dunno either about most of the specifics of the man, other than he was very capable financially-knowledge wise, and was tutored by the Morgan group, and that ought to tell us a little something.

I do know he is a permanent resident in a prominent cemetery in Washington, DC, I know that.

Bob Cohen


locked Re: Southern accounting and billing terminology questions

D. Scott Chatfield
 

Sounds like what we called "memo billing" in the' 80s.  A non-revenue waybill.

As for B/L and Bs/L, that's bill and bills of lading.


Scott Chatfield


A&Y Dave in MD <dbott@...> wrote:
For anyone who may know early 20th century Southern Railway billing terminology:

I found a reference in a 1920's era note about "card billing" vs commercial billing for moving a Southern-owned shortline's locomotives to Spencer for repairs.  I'm assuming that card billing is what is done for a railroads own locomotives that are being moved in rather than assigned to a train. The superintendent also requested that the storekeeper provide the B/L for this engine and the Bs/L for future engines transported for repairs by the Southern.  I have no idea what that short hand means.

Can anyone enlighten me on the terminology and billing practices for the 1920's Southern Railway?  Is that terminology still in place in more recent times?

Dave
--

Sent from David Bott's desktop pc


locked Southern accounting and billing terminology questions

A&Y Dave in MD
 

For anyone who may know early 20th century Southern Railway billing terminology:

I found a reference in a 1920's era note about "card billing" vs commercial billing for moving a Southern-owned shortline's locomotives to Spencer for repairs.  I'm assuming that card billing is what is done for a railroads own locomotives that are being moved in rather than assigned to a train. The superintendent also requested that the storekeeper provide the B/L for this engine and the Bs/L for future engines transported for repairs by the Southern.  I have no idea what that short hand means.

Can anyone enlighten me on the terminology and billing practices for the 1920's Southern Railway?  Is that terminology still in place in more recent times?

Dave
--

Sent from David Bott's desktop pc


locked Re: Southeastern Railway Museum

Dave Queener
 

David,

Thank you for posting the pics. I did download them and I think several of them--the E-unit and SR wooden cab pics in particular--will come in handy for model-making. Thanks so much for posting these.

Yours,

Dave Queener
Knoxville, TN

On 12/15/2019 8:44 PM, David Friedlander wrote:
All,

I did not make it to Saltville to see the 4-4-0 locomotive, but thanks for letting me know it is there.

It looks like I have forgotten come back here and share the photos I took at the Southeastern Railway Museum in Duluth, GA. I spent perhaps 4 or 5 hours there about 943 photos, mostly for modeling purposes down the road for myself and maybe for others who have interest in things like the Amtrak Slumbercoach. I was surprised at how much I was allowed to walk through.

In any case, I've compiled them all into a Google Drive. It should be public for anyone who has the link. I don't plan on taking it down anytime soon. Regardless, I think you should be able to download any photos you want to save off for your modeling in case it somehow disappears.


Enjoy.

Happy Holidays,
David Friedlander
NY, NY


_._,_._,_
-- 
Owner, Cumberland Model Engineering
(865) 333-5712  www.CumberlandModelEngineering.com  

Pastor, St. Paul Presbyterian Church
(865) 209-5654  www.StPaulPres.com  


locked Re: Samuel Spencer

George Eichelberger
 

If anyone is seriously interested in doing research on Samuel Spencer, we moved six file cabinets of his papers out of the basement of the 175 Spring St bldg when NS gave the SR Presidents’ files to SRHA. (With sincere thanks to Mr. David Goode!).

They are available for research at our archives at TVRM.

Ike


On Dec 20, 2019, at 10:33 AM, C J Wyatt <cjwyatt@...> wrote:

Yes, I have been a bit surprised that no one has done a book on Samuel Spencer.

Well we know that he liked quail hunting and he apparently enjoyed hanging around the Jekyll Island Club. Paranormal folklore says that his ghost haunts the place and likes to play tricks on guests such as rearranging things.

I hope someone takes up the project.

Jack Wyatt

On Friday, December 20, 2019, 09:46:13 AM EST, Cohen Bob via Groups.Io <orl96782@...> wrote:


James and all:

As no proper biography exists for Spencer that I have seen, I for one would like to see one, and with it, the answer to your query.

He was obviously a capable person and financially astute and after the B&O evicted him from its presidency after one year where he tried to show where B&O's wonder boy John W. Garrett, had been cooking the books for years, those in control of the B&O stock couldn't handle that and he was cast out after just one year and went into the camp of JP Morgan. Morgan placed him as one of the receivers of the Richmond & Danville RR and became SR's first president in 1894 and remained until he was killed in a rear end accident on his own railroad 10 miles south of Lynchburg in late November 1906.

I, too, have often wondered as to his personality and attitudes, especially towards the B&O. Was he above all that or did he have an inward desire to get back at them/it?

I dunno either. would be nice to see somewhere.

I have heard his papers are somewhere in North Carolina, just waiting for someone to do what we ask here.

Bob Cohen


locked Re: Samuel Spencer

C J Wyatt
 

Yes, I have been a bit surprised that no one has done a book on Samuel Spencer.

Well we know that he liked quail hunting and he apparently enjoyed hanging around the Jekyll Island Club. Paranormal folklore says that his ghost haunts the place and likes to play tricks on guests such as rearranging things.

I hope someone takes up the project.

Jack Wyatt

On Friday, December 20, 2019, 09:46:13 AM EST, Cohen Bob via Groups.Io <orl96782@...> wrote:


James and all:

As no proper biography exists for Spencer that I have seen, I for one would like to see one, and with it, the answer to your query.

He was obviously a capable person and financially astute and after the B&O evicted him from its presidency after one year where he tried to show where B&O's wonder boy John W. Garrett, had been cooking the books for years, those in control of the B&O stock couldn't handle that and he was cast out after just one year and went into the camp of JP Morgan. Morgan placed him as one of the receivers of the Richmond & Danville RR and became SR's first president in 1894 and remained until he was killed in a rear end accident on his own railroad 10 miles south of Lynchburg in late November 1906.

I, too, have often wondered as to his personality and attitudes, especially towards the B&O. Was he above all that or did he have an inward desire to get back at them/it?

I dunno either. would be nice to see somewhere.

I have heard his papers are somewhere in North Carolina, just waiting for someone to do what we ask here.

Bob Cohen


locked Re: Samuel Spencer

Cohen Bob
 

James and all:

As no proper biography exists for Spencer that I have seen, I for one would like to see one, and with it, the answer to your query.

He was obviously a capable person and financially astute and after the B&O evicted him from its presidency after one year where he tried to show where B&O's wonder boy John W. Garrett, had been cooking the books for years, those in control of the B&O stock couldn't handle that and he was cast out after just one year and went into the camp of JP Morgan. Morgan placed him as one of the receivers of the Richmond & Danville RR and became SR's first president in 1894 and remained until he was killed in a rear end accident on his own railroad 10 miles south of Lynchburg in late November 1906.

I, too, have often wondered as to his personality and attitudes, especially towards the B&O. Was he above all that or did he have an inward desire to get back at them/it?

I dunno either. would be nice to see somewhere.

I have heard his papers are somewhere in North Carolina, just waiting for someone to do what we ask here.

Bob Cohen


locked Virginia's Governor announces Potomac River passenger train bridge replacement

Cohen Bob
 

Okay, so you construct a new, parallel bridge next to the 1904 Long Bridge and then what?

By my understanding, unless you ALSO expand the track infrastructure north of the bridge in concert with said construction, where clearances are tight, not to mention the First Street Tunnel into Union Station, all that has been accomplished is you have moved the choke point about one measly mile north of the Potomac River and the only accomplishment is at Virginia taxpayer's expense.

There are just two tracks north of the bridge into DC and CSX has just recently totally rebuilt its Virginia Avenue freight routing to two tracks, at someone's great expense, not that it has been used by passenger trains regularly since November 1907 (basically only re-routings and excursions), little has been actually accomplished other then fleecing taxpayers and a lot of hopes and wannabe this's, that's and t'other's.

A little very basic history here just for perspective:

The first bridge across the river was built here under President Thomas Jefferson's presidency, was burned by the Federals in 1814 to keep the British from entering DC that way (which they did anyway), rebuilt afterwards and remained a privately owned crossing until damaged by flooding around 1832.

It was rebuilt under government auspices under President Andrew Jackson in 1836-1837 and with various fits and starts, remained until the 1860s and the Civil War necessitated other exigencies.

By that time, it was old and rickety and could NOT support locomotives (although the Union tried without success I am told), and the US MRR built an entirely new parallel bridge 1863-1864 which was reopened in October 1864 and could support locomotives.

The older parallel bridge didn't last much longer but then neither did the just built US M RR bridge.

Under the guidance of Pennsylvania senator Simon Cameron, the bridge ownership was transferred from the government to (cough, cough, ahem !!)  "his" aligned Pennsylvania Railroad in June 1870, which promptly built an entirely new parallel structure replacing the CW built one.

When that new one opened in May 1872, the older one was removed, and with various fits and starts remained until 1907 when it was removed.

However, the next new bridge was built here 1902-1904 and opened August 28, 1904. A little sidelight to history here, the first train to pass across it was a Southern Railway passenger train to Bluemont, Virginia, the line which came under the auspices of the Washington & Old Dominion RR on July 1, 1912.

During World War II, the government recognizing the even then inadequacies of the existing bridge removed the truss spans and replaced them with girders as we see today, also with a new supporting pier between each of the older ones. All spans were replaced at that time EXCEPT the movable portion which still stands today over the channel. During the rebuilding, traffic was maintained, except for brief periods when a single old span was removed and two new ones were simultaneously placed.

Along the way, in 1902 or thereabouts, the PR's corporate structure changed a wee bit as its older PW&B (Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore RR), was "sold" to its PB&W (Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington) RR and that remained until Penn Central of February 1, 1968, which phased into Conrail in 1976, which then was phased out in 1999 to the present CSXT (Chessie Seaboard Expanded or multiplied) RR, which is where we are today.

In 1870, one of the stipulations by ole Simon Cameron was that the PRR (albeit B&P (Baltimore & Potomac RR or the Alexandria & Washington RR), as a condition of said ownership transfer maintain it in good, operable condition and permit any and all other RR passage across it in perpetuity.

Unless the government is ready to totally nationalize the railroads, (I sincerely doubt that for obvious reasons), the expenses of all this, while wonderful for the traveling public which largely doesn't directly patronize the railroads in passenger service, is a whopper of an expense. The public does of course benefit indirectly from the freight carried every mile of the way.

And 100 or more years ago the people and trust busters, and progressive leadership of the country told us that the likes of JP Morgan, Gould, Fisk, CP Huntington and the Big Four, and many others were evil individuals leading even more evil and bad corporations?

Do you detect a wee touch of cynicism from here?

end of soapbox.


Bob Cohen


locked Re: Southern Rolling Stock

George Eichelberger
 

James:

Are you aware that SRHA has published a three-volume set of SR freight car diagrams plus books on Southern’s 40 and 50 box cars? I suggest you check out the SRHA “Grab” on www.srha.com, TIES magazine also includes articles of Southern rolling stock.

Ike


On Dec 20, 2019, at 6:11 AM, James Walton <whovianwil@...> wrote:

Does anyone know of any published resources for the Southern's rolling stock? The reprint of the 1953 ORER is fine for numbers of freight cars, but very little else.


locked Re: Southern Rolling Stock

Aidrian Bridgeman-Sutton
 

James, 

What are you looking for?  There is no single source foe everything as far as I know, but knowing whether you're looking for paint details, plans or something else might be helpful.

Aidrian 


On Fri, 20 Dec 2019, 11:11 am James Walton, <whovianwil@...> wrote:
Does anyone know of any published resources for the Southern's rolling stock? The reprint of the 1953 ORER is fine for numbers of freight cars, but very little else.


locked Southern Rolling Stock

James Walton <whovianwil@...>
 

Does anyone know of any published resources for the Southern's rolling stock? The reprint of the 1953 ORER is fine for numbers of freight cars, but very little else.


locked Re: Samuel Spencer

James Walton <whovianwil@...>
 

Does anyone know any details regarding Spencer's personality?


On Thu, Dec 19, 2019, 10:34 Robert Hanson via Groups.Io <RHanson669=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Apparently I missed something - are they going to move the statue?

I believe that the statue is sitting right where it should sit - in front of the NS building in Atlanta and if it should be moved at all, it should be moved to the new NS corporate HQ building when it is completed.

My opinion - and my opinion, plus $2.00, will get you a copy of an Atlanta newspaper on any weekday.

Bob Hanson


-----Original Message-----
From: C J Wyatt <cjwyatt@...>
To: main <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Dec 19, 2019 10:08 am
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Samuel Spencer

Unfortunately, people are become less likely to judge a historical person by the context of his times. Samuel Spencer was only a teenager at the time seeing his state being invaded by outside forces.

While on the surface, Spencer Shops appears to be the proper place for Samuel, you have to ask where he would he be safe from "the crazies". North Carolina recently allowed the statue of another Confederate soldier named Sam to be pulled down.

I find it sad that the Georgia born Samuel Spencer cannot reside at the NSC headquarters in Georgia. The economic growth in the Southeast which his Southern Railway System facilitated helped to raise the standards of living for all people in the region.

Jack Wyatt

On Thursday, December 19, 2019, 08:45:04 AM EST, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:


I understand there is now a question about what to do with Mr. Spencer’s statue that sits in front of the David Goode building in Atlanta. SRHA members have suggested its proper home is at the shops at Spencer, NC. Although some have mentioned moving it to TVRM, I think the consensus (for what it is worth) is that Spencer is the proper place if not at the NS headquarters.

We have NS President Wick Moorman to thank for making the effort to retrieve the statue from obscurity in Atlanta and moving it to Goode building. In my personal opinion, any railroad or corporation that forgets or ignores its history (NS, in all of its predecessors has as much as anyone) is “pulling the pin” on what has gone before.

(BTW) In the SRHA file on the statue’s dedication, it mentions how SR employees paid for it with deductions from their pay envelopes. The “chits” employees signed for the deductions were sealed in a box below the statue. When the statue’s base was moved, the box was located and opened. Unfortunately, water had entered it long ago and the chits were simply a mass of rotten paper. While the effort failed, it was a fine example of NS wanting to preserve its past.




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