Date   

locked Re: Heater Car 50 at TVRM?

Jason Greene
 

I was thinking the same thing about the 38-2. Seems like anything out of the norm for Southern passenger trains didn’t fit through that tunnel. 

Jason Greene 

On Mar 11, 2021, at 11:36 AM, Rob Wingo <robertawingo@...> wrote:



Too bad, was a great idea!

 

That seems really odd a GP-38 wouldn’t fit through the 1st street tunnel.  It was tight but why a GP38?  How could they be bigger than the Amtrak SDP40Fs?

Length  72 ft 4 in (22.0 m)

Width    10 ft 4 in (3.1 m)

But mysteriously no height?

 

Well I had to research some and a GP-38-2 is

Length  59 ft 2 in (18.03 m)

Width    10 ft 4.5 in (3.16 m)

Height   15 ft 4 in (4.67 m) –

 

I guess it is too tall….

 

You know though after looking at the pictures, the SDP40F has a curvature to the roofline and the Washington tunnel is very rounded at the top, so maybe that’s the reason.

 

Wikipedia says the tunnel height is 17’ and width 16’.  I have seen pictures where an E8 filled it up.

 

E8 dimensions:

Length  70 ft 3 in (21.41 m)

Width    10 ft 7 1⁄2 in (3.24 m)

Height   14 ft 7 in (4.45 m)

 

 

 

<image001.png>

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io> On Behalf Of Felix Freeman
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 10:49 AM
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Heater Car 50 at TVRM?

 

Back in the 70s Southern ran "School Boy Patrols" out of Atlanta to Washington DC.  These were week end events in which various school systems in the Atlanta area would send middle schoolers to DC by train.  These were enormous undertakings.  A typical train would be 20+ cars with 4 units.  Needless to say this put a strain on equipment supply.  Equipment on regular trains was cut back.  Most spare equipment was put in service.  Pegram Shop was responsible to supply motive power.  One year someone at Pegram came up with the brilliant idea to run GP38s with a heater car.  We did this and it worked quite well.  We were very proud of what we had done. However the next day after the train got back we were advised that GP38 would not fit thru the DC tunnel and we were never to do it again.  This heater car was one made from the FT B units.  I don't remember the number.  I do have a photo of the train somewhere.       

 

On Thu, Mar 11, 2021 at 10:13 AM Rob Wingo <robertawingo@...> wrote:

That solves it!

 

Thanks,

Rob

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charles Powell
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 10:09 AM
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Heater Car 50 at TVRM?

 

If my memory is correct, when the heater car first showed up in Chattanooga and was loaned to TVRM for supplying steam to the cars that were stored at Terminal Station it was HC-50. At some point  it went to the Chattanooga Diesel shop and renumbered into a 900000 number. 960600 maybe? There was one diesel powered trip to Huntsville that the car was used on in the 70s.
Charlie


locked Re: Heater Car 50 at TVRM?

Rob Wingo
 

Too bad, was a great idea!

 

That seems really odd a GP-38 wouldn’t fit through the 1st street tunnel.  It was tight but why a GP38?  How could they be bigger than the Amtrak SDP40Fs?

Length  72 ft 4 in (22.0 m)

Width    10 ft 4 in (3.1 m)

But mysteriously no height?

 

Well I had to research some and a GP-38-2 is

Length  59 ft 2 in (18.03 m)

Width    10 ft 4.5 in (3.16 m)

Height   15 ft 4 in (4.67 m) –

 

I guess it is too tall….

 

You know though after looking at the pictures, the SDP40F has a curvature to the roofline and the Washington tunnel is very rounded at the top, so maybe that’s the reason.

 

Wikipedia says the tunnel height is 17’ and width 16’.  I have seen pictures where an E8 filled it up.

 

E8 dimensions:

Length  70 ft 3 in (21.41 m)

Width    10 ft 7 1⁄2 in (3.24 m)

Height   14 ft 7 in (4.45 m)

 

 

 

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io> On Behalf Of Felix Freeman
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 10:49 AM
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Heater Car 50 at TVRM?

 

Back in the 70s Southern ran "School Boy Patrols" out of Atlanta to Washington DC.  These were week end events in which various school systems in the Atlanta area would send middle schoolers to DC by train.  These were enormous undertakings.  A typical train would be 20+ cars with 4 units.  Needless to say this put a strain on equipment supply.  Equipment on regular trains was cut back.  Most spare equipment was put in service.  Pegram Shop was responsible to supply motive power.  One year someone at Pegram came up with the brilliant idea to run GP38s with a heater car.  We did this and it worked quite well.  We were very proud of what we had done. However the next day after the train got back we were advised that GP38 would not fit thru the DC tunnel and we were never to do it again.  This heater car was one made from the FT B units.  I don't remember the number.  I do have a photo of the train somewhere.       

 

On Thu, Mar 11, 2021 at 10:13 AM Rob Wingo <robertawingo@...> wrote:

That solves it!

 

Thanks,

Rob

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charles Powell
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 10:09 AM
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Heater Car 50 at TVRM?

 

If my memory is correct, when the heater car first showed up in Chattanooga and was loaned to TVRM for supplying steam to the cars that were stored at Terminal Station it was HC-50. At some point  it went to the Chattanooga Diesel shop and renumbered into a 900000 number. 960600 maybe? There was one diesel powered trip to Huntsville that the car was used on in the 70s.
Charlie


locked Re: Heater Car 50 at TVRM?

Felix Freeman
 

Back in the 70s Southern ran "School Boy Patrols" out of Atlanta to Washington DC.  These were week end events in which various school systems in the Atlanta area would send middle schoolers to DC by train.  These were enormous undertakings.  A typical train would be 20+ cars with 4 units.  Needless to say this put a strain on equipment supply.  Equipment on regular trains was cut back.  Most spare equipment was put in service.  Pegram Shop was responsible to supply motive power.  One year someone at Pegram came up with the brilliant idea to run GP38s with a heater car.  We did this and it worked quite well.  We were very proud of what we had done. However the next day after the train got back we were advised that GP38 would not fit thru the DC tunnel and we were never to do it again.  This heater car was one made from the FT B units.  I don't remember the number.  I do have a photo of the train somewhere.       


On Thu, Mar 11, 2021 at 10:13 AM Rob Wingo <robertawingo@...> wrote:

That solves it!

 

Thanks,

Rob

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charles Powell
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 10:09 AM
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Heater Car 50 at TVRM?

 

If my memory is correct, when the heater car first showed up in Chattanooga and was loaned to TVRM for supplying steam to the cars that were stored at Terminal Station it was HC-50. At some point  it went to the Chattanooga Diesel shop and renumbered into a 900000 number. 960600 maybe? There was one diesel powered trip to Huntsville that the car was used on in the 70s.
Charlie


locked Re: Heater Car 50 at TVRM?

Rob Wingo
 

That solves it!

 

Thanks,

Rob

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charles Powell
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 10:09 AM
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Heater Car 50 at TVRM?

 

If my memory is correct, when the heater car first showed up in Chattanooga and was loaned to TVRM for supplying steam to the cars that were stored at Terminal Station it was HC-50. At some point  it went to the Chattanooga Diesel shop and renumbered into a 900000 number. 960600 maybe? There was one diesel powered trip to Huntsville that the car was used on in the 70s.
Charlie


locked Re: Heater Car 50 at TVRM?

Charles Powell
 

If my memory is correct, when the heater car first showed up in Chattanooga and was loaned to TVRM for supplying steam to the cars that were stored at Terminal Station it was HC-50. At some point  it went to the Chattanooga Diesel shop and renumbered into a 900000 number. 960600 maybe? There was one diesel powered trip to Huntsville that the car was used on in the 70s.
Charlie


locked Re: Heater Car 50 at TVRM?

Rob Wingo
 

Thanks for the info.

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io> On Behalf Of TIM ANDREWS
Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 9:53 PM
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Heater Car 50 at TVRM?

 

There is a heater car that appears to be made from an express box car.  It has a 900000 number so I don't know for sure that it is HC-50.

 

Tim Andrews

 

On Wednesday, March 10, 2021, 06:30:34 PM EST, Rob Wingo <robertawingo@...> wrote:

 

 

Anyone,

 

Is the heater car HC-50  or a mid-train radio car or a transfer caboose preserved at TVRM?  I am interested in modeling them.

 

Thanks,

Rob


locked Re: Heater Car 50 at TVRM?

TIM ANDREWS
 

There is a heater car that appears to be made from an express box car.  It has a 900000 number so I don't know for sure that it is HC-50.

Tim Andrews

On Wednesday, March 10, 2021, 06:30:34 PM EST, Rob Wingo <robertawingo@...> wrote:


Anyone,

 

Is the heater car HC-50  or a mid-train radio car or a transfer caboose preserved at TVRM?  I am interested in modeling them.

 

Thanks,

Rob


locked Heater Car 50 at TVRM?

Rob Wingo
 

Anyone,

 

Is the heater car HC-50  or a mid-train radio car or a transfer caboose preserved at TVRM?  I am interested in modeling them.

 

Thanks,

Rob


locked Re: Moving to Atlanta...in 1928!

Bill Schafer
 

I meant to say that the image was of the newer of the old buildings on Penna Ave. Even though this area has long since been taken over by government office buildings, the Old Post Office still stands and is a handy landmark to figure out where things were 100 years ago. 

On Mar 10, 2021, at 15:18, Bill Schafer <bill4501@...> wrote:

Location of original SOU office buildings in Washington, D.C. was at 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, a block west of the old Post Office at 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue. Southern added to these buildings over the years; I’ll have to check the dates, but the  original SOU HQ building - an ornate monstrosity - was partially destroyed by fire in 1916. 

When SOU built its new executive office building on K Street, it was not large enough to accommodate everyone at Pennsylvania Avenue, so they added five stories to the 125 Building and two stories to the 99 Building in Atlanta and moved a number of departments there in late 1928. See Southern News Bulletin for November 1928 for the story. 

Attached is an image of the office newest office building, which I think was built in 1916, at night in 1922. 

This is the Federal Triangle area today.

—Bill Schafer

<Washington DC 1300 Penna Ave office bldg at night Jan 3 1922 Leet Bros photo from NS.jpeg>



On Mar 10, 2021, at 14:21, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

Tim:

Here is a Google Drive link to SRHA Archives SR Presidents’ Files Box 420 File 9682 Washington, DC office.


Note that Chattanooga attempted to get the Sou Rwy headquarters.

Ike

PS If anyone would like to help get more files from the SRHA archives scanned……donations to www.srha.net or TVRM are always appreciated.





On Mar 10, 2021, at 2:07 PM, TIM ANDREWS <ANDREWSTIM@...> wrote:

Where were the original Southern offices in DC that the government took over?  I assume they might have been in the area now known as Federal Triangle.  From Wikipedia:

Seven of the buildings in Federal Triangle were built by the U.S. federal government in the early and mid-1930s as part of a coordinated construction plan 

On Wednesday, March 10, 2021, 01:49:47 PM EST, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:


What’s old is new again…Atlanta newspaper clipping from 3-6-1928 in the SRHA archives. (Box 420 File 9682 Washington DC Office Bldgs - 1927)

Ike

<1928-3-6 Atl Constitution  clipping.jpeg>


<1928-3-6 Atl Constitution  clipping.jpeg>




locked Re: Moving to Atlanta...in 1928!

Bill Schafer
 

Location of original SOU office buildings in Washington, D.C. was at 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, a block west of the old Post Office at 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue. Southern added to these buildings over the years; I’ll have to check the dates, but the  original SOU HQ building - an ornate monstrosity - was partially destroyed by fire in 1916. 

When SOU built its new executive office building on K Street, it was not large enough to accommodate everyone at Pennsylvania Avenue, so they added five stories to the 125 Building and two stories to the 99 Building in Atlanta and moved a number of departments there in late 1928. See Southern News Bulletin for November 1928 for the story. 

Attached is an image of the office newest office building, which I think was built in 1916, at night in 1922. 

This is the Federal Triangle area today.

—Bill Schafer





On Mar 10, 2021, at 14:21, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

Tim:

Here is a Google Drive link to SRHA Archives SR Presidents’ Files Box 420 File 9682 Washington, DC office.


Note that Chattanooga attempted to get the Sou Rwy headquarters.

Ike

PS If anyone would like to help get more files from the SRHA archives scanned……donations to www.srha.net or TVRM are always appreciated.





On Mar 10, 2021, at 2:07 PM, TIM ANDREWS <ANDREWSTIM@...> wrote:

Where were the original Southern offices in DC that the government took over?  I assume they might have been in the area now known as Federal Triangle.  From Wikipedia:

Seven of the buildings in Federal Triangle were built by the U.S. federal government in the early and mid-1930s as part of a coordinated construction plan 

On Wednesday, March 10, 2021, 01:49:47 PM EST, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:


What’s old is new again…Atlanta newspaper clipping from 3-6-1928 in the SRHA archives. (Box 420 File 9682 Washington DC Office Bldgs - 1927)

Ike

<1928-3-6 Atl Constitution  clipping.jpeg>


<1928-3-6 Atl Constitution  clipping.jpeg>



locked Re: Moving to Atlanta...in 1928!

George Eichelberger
 

Tim:

Here is a Google Drive link to SRHA Archives SR Presidents’ Files Box 420 File 9682 Washington, DC office.


Note that Chattanooga attempted to get the Sou Rwy headquarters.

Ike

PS If anyone would like to help get more files from the SRHA archives scanned……donations to www.srha.net or TVRM are always appreciated.





On Mar 10, 2021, at 2:07 PM, TIM ANDREWS <ANDREWSTIM@...> wrote:

Where were the original Southern offices in DC that the government took over?  I assume they might have been in the area now known as Federal Triangle.  From Wikipedia:

Seven of the buildings in Federal Triangle were built by the U.S. federal government in the early and mid-1930s as part of a coordinated construction plan 

On Wednesday, March 10, 2021, 01:49:47 PM EST, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:


What’s old is new again…Atlanta newspaper clipping from 3-6-1928 in the SRHA archives. (Box 420 File 9682 Washington DC Office Bldgs - 1927)

Ike

<1928-3-6 Atl Constitution  clipping.jpeg>


<1928-3-6 Atl Constitution  clipping.jpeg>


locked Re: Moving to Atlanta...in 1928!

TIM ANDREWS
 

Where were the original Southern offices in DC that the government took over?  I assume they might have been in the area now known as Federal Triangle.  From Wikipedia:

Seven of the buildings in Federal Triangle were built by the U.S. federal government in the early and mid-1930s as part of a coordinated construction plan 

On Wednesday, March 10, 2021, 01:49:47 PM EST, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:


What’s old is new again…Atlanta newspaper clipping from 3-6-1928 in the SRHA archives. (Box 420 File 9682 Washington DC Office Bldgs - 1927)

Ike




locked Moving to Atlanta...in 1928!

George Eichelberger
 

What’s old is new again…Atlanta newspaper clipping from 3-6-1928 in the SRHA archives. (Box 420 File 9682 Washington DC Office Bldgs - 1927)

Ike




locked Creation of the RF&P - 1900

George Eichelberger
 

The SRHA Archives contain many files on agreements, correspondence and contracts with other railroads (beginning about 1894). 

The Southern Railway’s work with the Washington Southern predates the RF&P as the Southern had its own line to Alexandria, VA, interchanged freight with the PRR (PB&W) and B&O and used Washington Southern to get its passenger trains into DC before Washington Union Station was constructed.

There are multiple files on the WS, Potomac Yard and the RF&P, here (Box 83 File 3859 - 175 scanned items) is a two page letter from AJ Cassatt of the PRR to Sam Spencer written 2-21-1900 describing the concept of the RF&P.





locked Re: Greensboro map was Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars

bjarne@juno.com
 

It was a great job -- extra board out of Chicago as a service attendant and then as a lead service attendant. The Chicago crew base held almost all assignments except some of #7 and #8 (some Seattle crews), the DC section of the Bway Ltd until it went HEP (then we got it) and the Floridian. #3 and #4 also had some LA based crews - mostly in the sleepers I think..


locked Re: Greensboro map was Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars

Steve Ellis
 

Wow, you really got around the country.

On Mar 9, 2021, at 8:34 PM, bjarne@juno.com wrote:

My experiences go back to when I was a service attendant for Amtrak during the summer seasons of 1977, 1979, and 1980. The service attendants usually went to a different hotel than the transportation employees like conductors and engineers. This was probably because the transportation people had their hotels paid by the host railroad. Further, as both groups were represented by different unions, that also could have had an effect on who stayed where. For every rule, there is an exception. I stayed in the same places as the rest of the crew at Dubuque, Quincy, Carbondale, and Champaign. Different locales in LA, New York, New Orleans, Detroit, and St. Louis. Hope this information is helpful, FWIW. Bjarne Henderson, Valparaiso, IN





locked Re: Greensboro map was Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars

bjarne@juno.com
 

My experiences go back to when I was a service attendant for Amtrak during the summer seasons of 1977, 1979, and 1980. The service attendants usually went to a different hotel than the transportation employees like conductors and engineers. This was probably because the transportation people had their hotels paid by the host railroad. Further, as both groups were represented by different unions, that also could have had an effect on who stayed where. For every rule, there is an exception. I stayed in the same places as the rest of the crew at Dubuque, Quincy, Carbondale, and Champaign. Different locales in LA, New York, New Orleans, Detroit, and St. Louis. Hope this information is helpful, FWIW. Bjarne Henderson, Valparaiso, IN


locked Re: Greensboro map was Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars

Steve Ellis
 

Or the cruise on the Crescent based out of New Orleans or Washington, or both?


On Mar 9, 2021, at 3:04 PM, Steve Ellis <meadowbrookdairy@...> wrote:

As I remember it, the attendants’ jackets did seem to look to be styled a little bit like a sports jacket or blazer, but without the lining or construction. They were also shorter, but I remember them having a button front and lapels.




On Mar 9, 2021, at 2:44 PM, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

When office car NS-8 arrived at TVRM, I was looking in the closets and discovered several what I’d call “attendants’ jackets, soiled but in good condition. Someday, I expect they will find a new use in a museum display?

Ike

PS We are still looking for new trucks for Southern OC-21 circa 1956 (when it was converted at Hayne Shop). If anyone know of any that might be available, let me know at archives@....



On Mar 9, 2021, at 2:19 PM, Robert W. Grabarek, Jr. <grabarek@...> wrote:

The white jacket was normal attire for coach attendants.

Bob Grabarek

-----Original Message----- 
From: "Steve Ellis via groups.io" 
Sent: Mar 9, 2021 12:17 PM 
To: "main@SouthernRailway.groups.io" 
Subject: Re: Greensboro map was Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars 

Wonderful, thank you! 

 On my trip on the Southern from Washington to Atlanta and back in October of 1970, it seemed that even car attendants wore a white cotton 
jacket that looks like something a waiter would wear. Is that normal attire or was this person perhaps a member of the dining staff filling in for
the regular car attendant? 


On Tuesday, March 9, 2021, 11:42:52 AM EST, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:


In addition to hotels, many cities and large railroad facilities had either bunkhouses or YMCAs. (There are plans for several in the archives.) The question is….were they used by dining car staff? I suspect that was not common because dining cars were dropped and picked up by trains at various depots.

Ike

PS Here are two pages from the 7-31-57 dining car assignments.



On Mar 9, 2021, at 10:58 AM, Steve Ellis via groups.io <meadowbrookdairy@...> wrote:

I was wondering if the Southern Railway ever housed any of their employees in a hotel for an overnight stay. I know that Amtrak does this. Here in New York City, one of the car attendants on the Crescent told me that he spends the night in a hotel right across the street from Penn Station.


Employees on American trains are not away from home nearly as much as those on the Russian trains. In 2010 I fulfilled a dream I’ve had from childhood and rode the Trans-Siberian railroad from Moscow to Vladivostok, a journey of seven days.


On YouTube you can watch a video of a lady who is an attendant on this train. Every time she leaves home it is for two weeks. The train does not have showers, and they do not get a hotel when they get to Vladivostok, sleeping in the train instead.


I spoke to one lady who said that she did two round trips and was away from home for a month.


Steve Ellis,
Brooklyn New York




On Mar 9, 2021, at 10:42 AM, Graves, William W <wwg@...> wrote:


> Was this installation located on the military reservation shown on your Greensboro map?
 
While I did not recognize the picture, the Military Reservation shown on the map was definitely what was called the ORD section of Greensboro.  The picture could have been from the Pilot Life Campus that was mentioned in the wiki article as it had trees and while my time in Greensboro didn’t start until 1954, by then the ORD section was quite built up with small industrial buildings.
- Bill



locked Re: Greensboro map was Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars

Steve Ellis
 

As I remember it, the attendants’ jackets did seem to look to be styled a little bit like a sports jacket or blazer, but without the lining or construction. They were also shorter, but I remember them having a button front and lapels.




On Mar 9, 2021, at 2:44 PM, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

When office car NS-8 arrived at TVRM, I was looking in the closets and discovered several what I’d call “attendants’ jackets, soiled but in good condition. Someday, I expect they will find a new use in a museum display?

Ike

PS We are still looking for new trucks for Southern OC-21 circa 1956 (when it was converted at Hayne Shop). If anyone know of any that might be available, let me know at archives@....



On Mar 9, 2021, at 2:19 PM, Robert W. Grabarek, Jr. <grabarek@...> wrote:

The white jacket was normal attire for coach attendants.

Bob Grabarek

-----Original Message----- 
From: "Steve Ellis via groups.io" 
Sent: Mar 9, 2021 12:17 PM 
To: "main@SouthernRailway.groups.io" 
Subject: Re: Greensboro map was Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars 

Wonderful, thank you! 

 On my trip on the Southern from Washington to Atlanta and back in October of 1970, it seemed that even car attendants wore a white cotton 
jacket that looks like something a waiter would wear. Is that normal attire or was this person perhaps a member of the dining staff filling in for
the regular car attendant? 


On Tuesday, March 9, 2021, 11:42:52 AM EST, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:


In addition to hotels, many cities and large railroad facilities had either bunkhouses or YMCAs. (There are plans for several in the archives.) The question is….were they used by dining car staff? I suspect that was not common because dining cars were dropped and picked up by trains at various depots.

Ike

PS Here are two pages from the 7-31-57 dining car assignments.



On Mar 9, 2021, at 10:58 AM, Steve Ellis via groups.io <meadowbrookdairy@...> wrote:

I was wondering if the Southern Railway ever housed any of their employees in a hotel for an overnight stay. I know that Amtrak does this. Here in New York City, one of the car attendants on the Crescent told me that he spends the night in a hotel right across the street from Penn Station.


Employees on American trains are not away from home nearly as much as those on the Russian trains. In 2010 I fulfilled a dream I’ve had from childhood and rode the Trans-Siberian railroad from Moscow to Vladivostok, a journey of seven days.


On YouTube you can watch a video of a lady who is an attendant on this train. Every time she leaves home it is for two weeks. The train does not have showers, and they do not get a hotel when they get to Vladivostok, sleeping in the train instead.


I spoke to one lady who said that she did two round trips and was away from home for a month.


Steve Ellis,
Brooklyn New York




On Mar 9, 2021, at 10:42 AM, Graves, William W <wwg@...> wrote:


> Was this installation located on the military reservation shown on your Greensboro map?
 
While I did not recognize the picture, the Military Reservation shown on the map was definitely what was called the ORD section of Greensboro.  The picture could have been from the Pilot Life Campus that was mentioned in the wiki article as it had trees and while my time in Greensboro didn’t start until 1954, by then the ORD section was quite built up with small industrial buildings.
- Bill



locked Re: Greensboro map was Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars

George Eichelberger
 

When office car NS-8 arrived at TVRM, I was looking in the closets and discovered several what I’d call “attendants’ jackets, soiled but in good condition. Someday, I expect they will find a new use in a museum display?

Ike

PS We are still looking for new trucks for Southern OC-21 circa 1956 (when it was converted at Hayne Shop). If anyone know of any that might be available, let me know at archives@....



On Mar 9, 2021, at 2:19 PM, Robert W. Grabarek, Jr. <grabarek@...> wrote:

The white jacket was normal attire for coach attendants.

Bob Grabarek

-----Original Message----- 
From: "Steve Ellis via groups.io" 
Sent: Mar 9, 2021 12:17 PM 
To: "main@SouthernRailway.groups.io" 
Subject: Re: Greensboro map was Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars 

Wonderful, thank you! 

 On my trip on the Southern from Washington to Atlanta and back in October of 1970, it seemed that even car attendants wore a white cotton 
jacket that looks like something a waiter would wear. Is that normal attire or was this person perhaps a member of the dining staff filling in for
the regular car attendant? 


On Tuesday, March 9, 2021, 11:42:52 AM EST, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:


In addition to hotels, many cities and large railroad facilities had either bunkhouses or YMCAs. (There are plans for several in the archives.) The question is….were they used by dining car staff? I suspect that was not common because dining cars were dropped and picked up by trains at various depots.

Ike

PS Here are two pages from the 7-31-57 dining car assignments.



On Mar 9, 2021, at 10:58 AM, Steve Ellis via groups.io <meadowbrookdairy@...> wrote:

I was wondering if the Southern Railway ever housed any of their employees in a hotel for an overnight stay. I know that Amtrak does this. Here in New York City, one of the car attendants on the Crescent told me that he spends the night in a hotel right across the street from Penn Station.


Employees on American trains are not away from home nearly as much as those on the Russian trains. In 2010 I fulfilled a dream I’ve had from childhood and rode the Trans-Siberian railroad from Moscow to Vladivostok, a journey of seven days.


On YouTube you can watch a video of a lady who is an attendant on this train. Every time she leaves home it is for two weeks. The train does not have showers, and they do not get a hotel when they get to Vladivostok, sleeping in the train instead.


I spoke to one lady who said that she did two round trips and was away from home for a month.


Steve Ellis,
Brooklyn New York




On Mar 9, 2021, at 10:42 AM, Graves, William W <wwg@...> wrote:


> Was this installation located on the military reservation shown on your Greensboro map?
 
While I did not recognize the picture, the Military Reservation shown on the map was definitely what was called the ORD section of Greensboro.  The picture could have been from the Pilot Life Campus that was mentioned in the wiki article as it had trees and while my time in Greensboro didn’t start until 1954, by then the ORD section was quite built up with small industrial buildings.
- Bill


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