Date   

locked Bagged cement for Fontana

Jim King
 

Bagged cement:  the Canton conductor I rode with during my 1977-81 college years told me he was working in Canton while Fontana Dam was being built (he was also assigned to Camp LeJuene RR for a short spell during the War).  He commented that 50-car trains of bagged cement in boxcars plus other cars used to fill out the train regularly came thru Canton as extras.  What made these special is that he saw light 2-8-2s (4500-class) on the head end quite often, a rarity on the branch, though allowed by timetable as far as Addie where they were turned on the wye and headed “home”.

 

He said cars bound for Fontana were stored everywhere between Canton and Bryson and really jammed up Canton yard.  Trains were forwarded to Bryson for staging and fed to the dam site as needed.  On top of all the dam traffic, imagine how else the line must have looked in view of the letter Ike just posted re: cars coming from the L&N?  Add in a passenger train each day and, likely, extra traffic due to the wartime effort.  Would really have been a busy era but, following the War and dam construction, it died off quickly.  The pax trains were gone by late 1948.  All of the extra moments related to those 4-ish years were also gone.  Only Graham County RR remained as a connection (L&N is not being counted as an on-line connection, just an interchange at the end).

 

Re: L&N’s interchanging in Murphy, Jim Wrinn and I made a couple trips to chase the L&N from Mineral Bluff to Murphy and back around 1979-80.  The trains had just empty wood racks headed to Culberson and Murphy wood yards and hauled 10-ish loads of wood back from Murphy.  Train, by then, ran on Monday only.  On 1 trip, the L&N dropped off a single 70-ton hopper in the Southern yard.  Without going back to that slide, I don’t remember if loaded or MT (I’ll check the springs).  If loaded, would it have been a commodity from Copper Hill bound for Canton?

 

Jim King

http://smokymountainmodelworks.com/

 


locked Re: Train Bulletin for FDR to travel to DC Feb 3 & 4, 1933

John Stewart
 

Hi Ike

 

Thanks very much, this is interesting

 

John

 

John R Stewart

www.bhamrails.info

205-901-3790

 

image004

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io [mailto:main@SouthernRailway.groups.io] On Behalf Of George Eichelberger
Sent: Wednesday, August 26, 2020 1:21 PM
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io
Subject: [SouthernRailway] Train Bulletin for FDR to travel to DC Feb 3 & 4, 1933

 

For the first inauguration of FDR in 1933, the Southern moved 7,633 passenger to Washington March 1- 4. More than 3200 were in Pullmans in regular trains, extra sections of regular trains and special trains. A note from ER Oliver to Fairfax Harrison says that was double the numbers in 1929. (It does not mention if the Pullmans were used as hotel space in DC.)

 

The following Bulletin is for FDR’s train from Warm Springs to Washington.

 

Ike

 

 


locked Re: Train Bulletin for FDR to travel to DC Feb 3 & 4, 1933

El Rod
 

 The attached is from Warm Springs to Jacksonville, Fl., not Washington.  This the order of cars "backwards" Warm Springs - McDonough on the M line, then locomotive placed to the South end for proper orientation to Jacksonville.


locked Train Bulletin for FDR to travel to DC Feb 3 & 4, 1933

George Eichelberger
 

For the first inauguration of FDR in 1933, the Southern moved 7,633 passenger to Washington March 1- 4. More than 3200 were in Pullmans in regular trains, extra sections of regular trains and special trains. A note from ER Oliver to Fairfax Harrison says that was double the numbers in 1929. (It does not mention if the Pullmans were used as hotel space in DC.)

The following Bulletin is for FDR’s train from Warm Springs to Washington.

Ike



locked Southern steam-jet AC on GG-1 pulled trains

George Eichelberger
 

Another post to the PCL about AC on Southern passenger equip.

Ike

PS If anyone is interested, I will post the Google Drive link to the presentation I mention here.



Begin forwarded message:

From: george eichelberger <geichelberger@...>
Subject: Re: Southern steam-jet AC on GG-1 pulled trains
Date: August 24, 2020 at 7:46:42 PM EDT

Dave:

Yes, there are references to steam to electro-mech AC conversions throughout the SRHA archives. The question has never come up before so I do not know precise numbers or dates. It would be an interesting exercise, particularly if there was a relationship to cars used in through train service. Here is a page from a 1-22-54 Hayne Shop memo that refers to various Southern passenger car generator and AC programs.

Another, completely different, subject that concerned steam and electro-mechanical AC was on the WWII hospital cars. The Southern originated many trains from the Charleston POE to hospitals all over the country so wounded soldiers, sailors and Marines could convalesce near their homes and family. The selection of hospital and kitchen cars, and the Pullmans that accompanied the trains were dictated somewhat by the railroads they were to travel on and what kind of AC those roads used. I think I included that topic in a clinic I did at the Cocoa Beach RPM a few years ago. (I can re-post the (silent) presentation if anyone is interested in the subject of hospital, troop and POW trains.)

Ike



locked Southern steam-jet AC on GG-1 pulled trains

George Eichelberger
 

Here is the first of two posts to the Passenger Car List about the air conditioning used on Southern passenger trains….

Ike


Begin forwarded message:

From: george eichelberger <geichelberger@...>
Subject: Re: Southern steam-jet AC on GG-1 pulled trains
Date: August 24, 2020 at 10:02:59 AM EDT

I can never be certain posting “prototype” letters from the SRHA archives will be of interest to the group so I appreciate the additional details about the Southern passenger services north of Washington. One point to make…..although the PRR did not use steam ejector AC, its passenger cars all used steam heat and for hot water. It’s not so much a question of the Southern consist being in front or back of the PRR train, it’s a question of train length. PRR cars that did not require much steam still added to the length of the train line, and condensation.

The PRR/CR/PC relationship between the Southern and other roads’ through trains (north of DC ) was a finely tuned operation. Just changing the power at WUT had to be done but entire consists were broken up and changed. Not every car that came “from the South” continued past WUT.

Here is a list of Southern/PRR trains at WUT from a letter dated 2-26-52 (very tight crop and reduced resolution to limit size). (Hopefully, the page 1 onionskin can be ironed flat and re-scanned.)

Ike


\




locked Brunswick-Atlanta sleeper

George Eichelberger
 

Fortunately, there are as many answers as questions in the SRHA archives files. Note below…

Ike


locked Re: ODT and Pullman routes shorter than 450 miles

Robert Hanson
 

Ike - 

The Atlanta-Brunswick Pullman was, indeed, the last regularly-scheduled heavyweight Pullman run in the US.  David Morgan rode it and wrote about the trip in an issue of Trains in 1965 or '66.

I don't know about the reasons for the train's continued operation, but the Pullman came off in 1966, not too long after DPM took his ride.

Bob 








-----Original Message-----
From: George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...>
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Aug 19, 2020 11:03 am
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] ODT and Pullman routes shorter than 450 miles

Bob:

You are correct, Order 53 was only for Pullman lines, multiple other ODT orders early in the War directed the Southern to discontinue entire passenger trains (I may have posted an example earlier).

I have never found a comprehensive list of ODT orders although each/many of the individual orders are in the SRHA archives. We need to confirm, but the Atlanta-Brunswick Pullman (Line 2614) is mentioned when the Southern was trying to discontinue that train so either the sleeper was never taken off (ODT orders could be contested) or it was restored after the ODT cancelled Order No 53. I cannot confirm but I have read that was the last heavyweight Pullman to operate in regular service. In the (large) file containing all of that train's discontinuance documentation, it appears an influential Judge liked to book space in the car to go to Brunswick. He, almost single handedly, kept the Southern from discontinuing the Pullman and the entire train.

Ike


On Aug 19, 2020, at 9:43 AM, Robert Hanson via groups.io <RHanson669@...> wrote:

As I understand the order, only Pullman cars were affected, not entire trains.

The trains continued to run, but without Pullman service.

And again, as I understand the order, the purpose was to free Pullman equipment for the transfer of troops from the European Theater of Operations to the Pacific Theater, as the Pacific was very much an active war zone in July of 1945.

That's my understanding.

If anyone has more information, I'd like to know.

Bob Hanson
Loganville, GA


-----Original Message-----
From: George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...>
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io>; PassengerCarList@groups.io
Sent: Wed, Aug 19, 2020 9:29 am
Subject: [SouthernRailway] ODT and Pullman routes shorter than 450 miles

While looking for the letter from the Southern Railway President to other roads describing the air conditioning systems Southern used in its passenger cars for Ed Mims (not found yet), I came upon this July, 1945 notice from the SR Passenger Traffic Dept cancelling a number of Pullman “lines” per Office of Defense Transportation Order No. 53. Mid 1945 seems late in the war for such an order. I expect it was to prepare for the return of troops from the ETO and PTO. I assume many railroads were effected by the same order?

After the war, several state PUCs demanded the Southern reinstate passenger trains that had been removed by ODT order without PUC review. By 1946-47, with the decline in local passenger services, the Southern did not want to reinstate the trains but the PUC sometimes insisted so the railroad had to go through the entire process.

The passenger train material in the SRHA archives is extensive. Does anyone know if there are similar files at another historical group, archive or library? SRHA is contemplating producing a “Postwar Southern Railway Passenger Services and Equipment” book. If anyone has material on the subject, or would like to participate, please contact me off list.

Ike

<1945-7-7 Notice of disc Trs losing  Pullman services on les than 450 mile routes.jpeg>




<1945-7-7 Notice of disc Trs losing  Pullman services on les than 450 mile routes.jpeg>


locked Re: ODT and Pullman routes shorter than 450 miles

George Eichelberger
 

Bob:

You are correct, Order 53 was only for Pullman lines, multiple other ODT orders early in the War directed the Southern to discontinue entire passenger trains (I may have posted an example earlier).

I have never found a comprehensive list of ODT orders although each/many of the individual orders are in the SRHA archives. We need to confirm, but the Atlanta-Brunswick Pullman (Line 2614) is mentioned when the Southern was trying to discontinue that train so either the sleeper was never taken off (ODT orders could be contested) or it was restored after the ODT cancelled Order No 53. I cannot confirm but I have read that was the last heavyweight Pullman to operate in regular service. In the (large) file containing all of that train's discontinuance documentation, it appears an influential Judge liked to book space in the car to go to Brunswick. He, almost single handedly, kept the Southern from discontinuing the Pullman and the entire train.

Ike


On Aug 19, 2020, at 9:43 AM, Robert Hanson via groups.io <RHanson669@...> wrote:

As I understand the order, only Pullman cars were affected, not entire trains.

The trains continued to run, but without Pullman service.

And again, as I understand the order, the purpose was to free Pullman equipment for the transfer of troops from the European Theater of Operations to the Pacific Theater, as the Pacific was very much an active war zone in July of 1945.

That's my understanding.

If anyone has more information, I'd like to know.

Bob Hanson
Loganville, GA


-----Original Message-----
From: George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...>
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io>; PassengerCarList@groups.io
Sent: Wed, Aug 19, 2020 9:29 am
Subject: [SouthernRailway] ODT and Pullman routes shorter than 450 miles

While looking for the letter from the Southern Railway President to other roads describing the air conditioning systems Southern used in its passenger cars for Ed Mims (not found yet), I came upon this July, 1945 notice from the SR Passenger Traffic Dept cancelling a number of Pullman “lines” per Office of Defense Transportation Order No. 53. Mid 1945 seems late in the war for such an order. I expect it was to prepare for the return of troops from the ETO and PTO. I assume many railroads were effected by the same order?

After the war, several state PUCs demanded the Southern reinstate passenger trains that had been removed by ODT order without PUC review. By 1946-47, with the decline in local passenger services, the Southern did not want to reinstate the trains but the PUC sometimes insisted so the railroad had to go through the entire process.

The passenger train material in the SRHA archives is extensive. Does anyone know if there are similar files at another historical group, archive or library? SRHA is contemplating producing a “Postwar Southern Railway Passenger Services and Equipment” book. If anyone has material on the subject, or would like to participate, please contact me off list.

Ike

<1945-7-7 Notice of disc Trs losing  Pullman services on les than 450 mile routes.jpeg>




<1945-7-7 Notice of disc Trs losing  Pullman services on les than 450 mile routes.jpeg>


locked Re: ODT and Pullman routes shorter than 450 miles

C J Wyatt
 

Thanks Bob. That is my understanding, too. All part of planning the logistics for the invasion of Japan.  

Jack Wyatt

On Wednesday, August 19, 2020, 10:50:31 AM EDT, Robert Hanson via groups.io <rhanson669@...> wrote:





As I understand the order, only Pullman cars were affected, not entire trains.



The trains continued to run, but without Pullman service.




And again, as I understand the order, the purpose was to free Pullman equipment for the transfer of troops from the European Theater of Operations to the Pacific Theater, as the Pacific was very much an active war zone in July of 1945.




That's my understanding.




If anyone has more information, I'd like to know.




Bob Hanson

Loganville, GA



-----Original Message-----
From: George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...>
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io>; PassengerCarList@groups.io
Sent: Wed, Aug 19, 2020 9:29 am
Subject: [SouthernRailway] ODT and Pullman routes shorter than 450 miles



While looking for the letter from the Southern Railway President to other roads describing the air conditioning systems Southern used in its passenger cars for Ed Mims (not found yet), I came upon this July, 1945 notice from the SR Passenger Traffic Dept cancelling a number of Pullman “lines” per Office of Defense Transportation Order No. 53. Mid 1945 seems late in the war for such an order. I expect it was to prepare for the return of troops from the ETO and PTO. I assume many railroads were effected by the same order?


After the war, several state PUCs demanded the Southern reinstate passenger trains that had been removed by ODT order without PUC review. By 1946-47, with the decline in local passenger services, the Southern did not want to reinstate the trains but the PUC sometimes insisted so the railroad had to go through the entire process.



The passenger train material in the SRHA archives is extensive. Does anyone know if there are similar files at another historical group, archive or library? SRHA is contemplating producing a “Postwar Southern Railway Passenger Services and Equipment” book. If anyone has material on the subject, or would like to participate, please contact me off list.



Ike


locked Re: ODT and Pullman routes shorter than 450 miles

Robert Hanson
 

As I understand the order, only Pullman cars were affected, not entire trains.

The trains continued to run, but without Pullman service.

And again, as I understand the order, the purpose was to free Pullman equipment for the transfer of troops from the European Theater of Operations to the Pacific Theater, as the Pacific was very much an active war zone in July of 1945.

That's my understanding.

If anyone has more information, I'd like to know.

Bob Hanson
Loganville, GA


-----Original Message-----
From: George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...>
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io>; PassengerCarList@groups.io
Sent: Wed, Aug 19, 2020 9:29 am
Subject: [SouthernRailway] ODT and Pullman routes shorter than 450 miles

While looking for the letter from the Southern Railway President to other roads describing the air conditioning systems Southern used in its passenger cars for Ed Mims (not found yet), I came upon this July, 1945 notice from the SR Passenger Traffic Dept cancelling a number of Pullman “lines” per Office of Defense Transportation Order No. 53. Mid 1945 seems late in the war for such an order. I expect it was to prepare for the return of troops from the ETO and PTO. I assume many railroads were effected by the same order?

After the war, several state PUCs demanded the Southern reinstate passenger trains that had been removed by ODT order without PUC review. By 1946-47, with the decline in local passenger services, the Southern did not want to reinstate the trains but the PUC sometimes insisted so the railroad had to go through the entire process.

The passenger train material in the SRHA archives is extensive. Does anyone know if there are similar files at another historical group, archive or library? SRHA is contemplating producing a “Postwar Southern Railway Passenger Services and Equipment” book. If anyone has material on the subject, or would like to participate, please contact me off list.

Ike






locked ODT and Pullman routes shorter than 450 miles

George Eichelberger
 

While looking for the letter from the Southern Railway President to other roads describing the air conditioning systems Southern used in its passenger cars for Ed Mims (not found yet), I came upon this July, 1945 notice from the SR Passenger Traffic Dept cancelling a number of Pullman “lines” per Office of Defense Transportation Order No. 53. Mid 1945 seems late in the war for such an order. I expect it was to prepare for the return of troops from the ETO and PTO. I assume many railroads were effected by the same order?

After the war, several state PUCs demanded the Southern reinstate passenger trains that had been removed by ODT order without PUC review. By 1946-47, with the decline in local passenger services, the Southern did not want to reinstate the trains but the PUC sometimes insisted so the railroad had to go through the entire process.

The passenger train material in the SRHA archives is extensive. Does anyone know if there are similar files at another historical group, archive or library? SRHA is contemplating producing a “Postwar Southern Railway Passenger Services and Equipment” book. If anyone has material on the subject, or would like to participate, please contact me off list.

Ike






locked Southern steam-jet AC on GG-1 pulled trains

George Eichelberger
 


From the SRHA archives…..Here is an interesting note from PRR’s AVP Motive Power to SR President EE Norris about steam jet AC. (The “train” is the Southerner.)

Ike



locked Southern Logo Lettering size quesiton

Allen Cain
 

When did the size of "The Southern Serves The South" lettering change? Was the larger lettering first or later?  

Allen Cain


locked Re: Questions about Southern SDs

Al Collins <erb_2939@...>
 

Thanks for that info Don, that is interesting none the less. Its plausible some of SDs did have the low idle retrofitted then.

There is a video on Youtube about training on Saluda and in the video it shows a SD45 cab, and its clearly in low idle. But given the age of the video, I was thinking the sound was dubbed or a simulator, not being a actual Southern SD45. 

On my HO-scale locomotives, the sound file has low idle as well but again, its just a generic file and was wondering if that was prototypical.

Thanks!

Alex




-------- Original message --------
From: Don Usak <donusak@...>
Date: 2020-08-06 00:31 (GMT-05:00)
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Questions about Southern SDs

I realize Al's question was in regard to Southern SD locomotives, but Southern did have some GP30s and possibly some GP35s that were equipped with low idle.  This was a homemade system developed by Pete Wydener (sp?), a General Foreman at Chattanooga Diesel Shop.  Pete's system was mounted in the left side of the electrical cabinet behind the panel holding the warning lights, light switches, and the isolation switch.

At least a handful of GP30s were equipped, but I cannot recall how widespread the retrofit may have been.

Don


locked Re: Questions about Southern SDs

Don Usak
 

I realize Al's question was in regard to Southern SD locomotives, but Southern did have some GP30s and possibly some GP35s that were equipped with low idle.  This was a homemade system developed by Pete Wydener (sp?), a General Foreman at Chattanooga Diesel Shop.  Pete's system was mounted in the left side of the electrical cabinet behind the panel holding the warning lights, light switches, and the isolation switch.

At least a handful of GP30s were equipped, but I cannot recall how widespread the retrofit may have been.

Don


locked O scale details for a SRR-style RS-3?

Lee Bishop
 

Hello all,
I’ve toyed around for a while with the idea of making an O scale version of ET&WNC RS-3 # 209 or 210, which were CoG engines with all the SRR style parts on them with changed road names (until the white tuxedo stripe got replaced with orange, anyway). Just something to run somewhere if I ever get the chance, as I only mode the ET&WNC in On30, probably in 3-rail but one of the more accurate models around.
I have no idea if anyone makes a SSR-style bell/bracket as well as the correct marker lights in O scale so I could take this project on if I wanted to proceed. I’ve looked around but can’t seem to find anything that’d work. I built this exact thing in HO scale a zillion years ago (sold it at a train show in the 90s, when I got out of HO forever), but we all know in HO scale, you can find almost anything.
Does anyone know if someone makes these parts?
Lee Bishop
 


locked Re: Questions about Southern SDs

Robert Graham
 

Mr. Collins:

Answers to your queries below in UPPER CASE as I know them.

Bob Graham

-----------------------------------------

From: "Al Collins"
To: "main@SouthernRailway.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Monday August 3 2020 5:42:10PM
Subject: [SouthernRailway] Questions about Southern SDs

Being relatively new to researching Southern, would anyone happen to have answers for the following questions:

Were the 35/40/40-2/45s all equipped with low idle? NORMAL IDLE RPM; I BELIEVE LOW IDLE STARTED WITH THE 645F3 PRIME MOVER (GP40X/50 7000-7092)

Did they have dual control stands or except for the 35s, was the long hood always considered "front"? NO SOU DIESEL HAD DUAL CONTROLS. 
ON 2ND GENERATION EMD UNITS, LOOK FOR THE LOCATION OF THE BELL; IT WILL ALWAYS BE MOUNTED ON THE DESIGNATED FRONT ACCORDING TO CONTROL STAND ORIENTATION. 
SD24 SD35 SHORT HOOD FRONT
SD45, SD40, SD40-2 LONG HOOD FRONT
SOU CONSIDERED THEM TO BE BI-DIRECTIONAL AND ALL CLASSES WERE OPERATED EITHER WAY

Is there a spotting feature for determining if one was a lococontrol master? Extra firecracker antenna?
YES. WHITE NUMBER BOARDS WITH BLACK NUMERALS (THE STANDARD FOR SOU DIESELS WAS BLACK WITH WHITE NUMERALS). ALSO, ON EMD LOCOMOTIVES, THE SHORT HOOD NUMBERBOARDS ARE SLIGHTLY BUILT-OUT FROM THE HOOD END SHEET METAL TO PERMIT NUMBER BOARD BULBS TO BE SERVICED FROM OUTSIDE. THEY WERE HINGED AND SWUNG UP. ALSO, THE RADIO COMMUNICATION FIRECRACKER ANTENNA WAS LOCATED ON THE LONG HOOD ON THE DYNAMIC BRAKE RESISTOR BLISTER BETWEEN THE RADIATOR FANS AND DB FANS. THE THROTTLE AND BRAKE CONTROL ANTENNAS WERE BOTH MOUNTED ON THE ROOF OF THE SHORT HOOD ON LOCOTROL EQUIPPED UNITS DURING THE SOU ERA. BE AWARE THAT THE FINAL ORDER OF SD40-2 3312-3328 THE RADIO COMMUNICATION ANTENNA WAS LOCATED OUT ON THE DB RESISTOR BLISTER, BUT THESE SD40-2 WERE NOT LOCOTROL-EQUIPPED.

Were groups of them assigned to specific divisions or would they roam system wide? NO DIVISIONAL ASSIGNMENTS; THEY ROAMED SYSTEM WIDE, BUT LOCOTROL UNITS STAYED USUALLY IN COAL TERRITORY AND HEAVY MAINLINE FREIGHT DUTY.

I know the SD40-2s had P3s then P5 in the last batch. What did the 35s, 40/45s have? CORRECT HORN FOR SD40-2 3201-3254 IS NATHAN P142, COMMONLY CALLED P3, ONE HORN CLUSTER WITH ALL BELLS FACING OUTWARD ON EACH HOOD END. SOU 3255-3328 HAD NATHAN P12345, COMMONLY CALLED P5, WITH ALL 5 BELLS FACING OUTWARD MOUNTED ON EACH HOOD END. 
SD35 HAD NATHAN M5R24
SD40 3170-3200 SAME AS EARLY SD40-2
SD45 3105-3159 LESLIE S-5T-RF MOUNTED ON CAB ROOF
SD45 3100-3104 (2ND), 3160-3169 NATHAN P142 ON EACH HOOD END, SAME AS SD40 AND FIRST GROUP SD40-2. BE AWARE HORNS CAN AND WERE SWAPPED OUT DURING THEIR SERVICE LIVES

Did Southern use steel or bronze bells? BRONZE AS FAR AS I KNOW. THEY WERE BRONZE GOLD WHEN FRESH ON NEW UNITS

As always, any other information regarding these units would be welcome as well.

Thanks,

Alex



Thanks,

Alex



locked Questions about Southern SDs

Al Collins <erb_2939@...>
 

Being relatively new to researching Southern, would anyone happen to have answers for the following questions:

Were the 35/40/40-2/45s all equipped with low idle? 

Did they have dual control stands or except for the 35s, was the long hood always considered "front"?

Is there a spotting feature for determining if one was a lococontrol master? Extra firecracker antenna?

Were groups of them assigned to specific divisions or would they roam system wide?

I know the SD40-2s had P3s then P5 in the last batch. What did the 35s, 40/45s have?

Did Southern use steel or bronze bells?

As always, any other information regarding these units would be welcome as well.

Thanks,

Alex



Thanks,

Alex



locked Re: Express Car Movements

George Eichelberger
 

Marv:

The IC-CofG relationship was very strong. There are virtually no references to the Southern handling package car traffic out of Chicago to anywhere on the SRS, except what came via the IC/Central (through B’ham?).

That may have been because the Southern’s package car system appears to be more focused on traffic from Southern territory to various gateway connections and transfer points and between Southern served cities. When the service began around 1906, it reflected the fact that the “South” was a destination of goods, not an originator. The transfer facility at Pot. Yard sent 203 cars to Birmingham (1,698.600 lbs) during the first nine months of 1909.

Here’s are two paragraphs from the TIES package car article…

The largest number of package car routes out of Atlanta to other railroads and ship lines were scheduled from Inman Transfer. Through cars from there went to: Akron, OH (AC&Y), Albany, GA (GSW&G), Charleston, SC (Clyde Lines), Charlotte, NC (NSRR), Chicago,IL (CI&L), Cincinnati (B&O and PRR), Cordele, GA (GS&F), Havana, Cuba (Thursdays, all rail via FEC), Jacksonville, FL (GS&F, FEC, SAL and ACL Fla Transfer), Kansas City (via E. St. Louis and MP), Miami, FL (FEC), Montgomery, AL (A&WP), New Orleans, LA (NO&NE), Springfield,OH (Big Four) and West Palm Beach, FL (FEC).

and…

The Directory also included lists of inbound cars from other railroads, “North of the Ohio River” sent 50 cars. The largest group, 20 cars, came from Chicago. Many were interchanged and routed to the Southern’s Vine St. and Lincoln Park freight stations in Cincinnati but through cars also came to Asheville, Birmingham, Chattanooga, Louisville and Atlanta. A Friday only refrigerator car from the Big Four in Chicago went to Columbia, SC.

Note that the Southern Directory shows 20 cars from Chicago. I need to see if I can locate near that number in the “Bulletin” issues we have.

I’d like to hear some feedback from folks about how interesting they think this kind of material is. We now have so many potential articles we can run in TIES, some may never make the “cut”.

Ike




On Aug 2, 2020, at 9:30 AM, Marv Clemons <mclemonsjr@...> wrote:

Ike, it's very interesting to learn that routings from Chicago to Montgomery via IC-Columbus GA - Central of Georgia were handled in near identical times as the more direct C&EI - L&N, and with only one local train on the Columbus-Montgomery segment vs. multiple schedules on the L&N.

Just one more reason to love the CofG!

Marv Clemons

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