Date   

locked Re: Extraordinary Obsolesce - Section Houses

Robert Hanson
 

There's a pie chart in the 1961 annual report that shows that 37.9% of the company's expenses were payroll expenses.  By far the largest single item.\

The next largest was the catchall "other operating expenses" that made up 13.7% of the total.

Source - Southern Railway Annual Report for 1961, page 5.

Bob Hanson
Loganville, GA


-----Original Message-----
From: darrell2010 via Groups.Io <darrell2010@...>
To: main <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Aug 9, 2019 7:53 pm
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Extraordinary Obsolesce - Section Houses

Dave,

Do you have anything to backup your statement that "the biggest expense was payroll"?

Thanks,
Darrell Sawyer

On Friday, August 9, 2019, 05:38:44 PM MDT, A&Y Dave in MD <dbott@...> wrote:


This sounds as plausible as any theory.  There was the restructuring to simplify the corporate complexity to save money and deal with the funded debt that was due.  This would be another way to save money, and one that was pushed by mechanization and the growing cost of labor after WWII. The economy was growing, but competition was based on reducing labor costs. The unions were nearing their zenith in size and power and the cost per employee was getting higher.  Income wasn't growing quickly that long after WWII and the only way to improve profits was reducing expenses. The biggest expense was the payroll.  And once you reduce the payroll, why keep the supporting infrastructure?

Dave

Friday, August 9, 2019, 11:37:01 AM, you wrote:


Ike:

My sense is that mechanization was a major driver in the reduction, or elimination, of MofW section gangs and the need for section houses. I’d like to see some documentation of this hunch, but Southern, like most other railroads in the 1950s, realized that they no longer needed section gangs every five to ten miles to maintain a given section of track. The sections were expanded in size when routine labor-intensive functions, such as spike driving, tie replacement, or ballast regulating, were economically performed by machines. While mechanization probably came to the large system gangs first, it did eventually trickle down to the sections.

One other consideration was the sense that a pretty railroad was not necessarily a cost-efficient railroad. We all love to see images of main line trains on rock ballasted track with a knife-edge definition to the ballast line. Restoring the roadbed to this condition after routine maintenance was, in the old days, performed manually with shovels and a large straight-edge - it was called dressing the track. As the 1950s progressed, that knife-edge appearance disappeared, not only because of deferred maintenance, but because the railroad no longer believed it needed a pretty right of way.

Another consideration is vegetation control. In the days of sections, weeds and brush were manually cleared to the right-of-way line - maybe 100’ on each side of the track - to prevent fires from passing steam locomotives. Section hands used picks and shovels and maybe scythes or sickles in this process. Once the steam engines disappeared, many railroads, Southern included, stopped clearing brush and weeds by hand, and depended on chemicals from weed spray trains to control stuff growing between, and just outside, the rails. In the Brosnan era, Southern even economized on weed control, spraying diesel fuel on the weeds instead of a specialty chemical. A review of photos of Southern trains from the 1960s will show that diesel fuel was largely ineffective on weeds, and the track and right-of-way really looked ratty.

All factors mentioned above made the old style section gangs - where you had a gang of five or six men and a foreman assigned to a section, which covered five to ten miles of track - an unnecessary luxury. Not all of the massive layoffs among the MofW forces in the 1950s were due to mechanization of the big gangs. Many men from the local section gangs were laid off too.

—Bill  


On Aug 9, 2019, at 7:16 AM, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

Two days of work in the SRHA archives has turned up yet another category of Southern Railway data...and a question.

After WWII, there were a number of "programs" that included the retirement of various structures and facilities. Memos show at least 20 different programs but a comprehensive list has not been found. One large system wide program identified structures and tracks no longer needed because of dieselization. Lists of items were prepared, then reviewed to determine which would be removed. Not every item made the final list, for example if a track used to service steam locos was also being used for diesels it would be taken off the list. The timing of the dieselization list is obvious, when a division stopped using steam. That list included all roundhouses, turntables, and coal and water stations as well as any stem rerlated tracks and "appurtenances".

The time of another "program" is not clear. 1951 appears to be when the Southern decided section houses were no longer needed. Can anyone suggest what happened in 1949-51 for the railroad to make the decision to dispose of many section houses: a new labor agreement, an ICC ruling, changes in tax laws?

There are several drawings and many photos of section houses in the SRHA archives, certainly enough for a comprehensive TIES article. I've attached one example of the documents used to sell company property. Although I have always been aware that section houses and depots were sold and then removed from railroad property, the proportion of "sold" properties is much higher than expected. The attached sale document may explain why, even in 1951 dollars, $65 to purchase a house, coal shed and outhouse is a good price, even considering they had to be removed from Southern property in most cases.

Although many section houses were constructed in the 1880s and 90s, some survive today as residences.

Ike <French Lick, IN  section house 79-EB-1.jpg>



--
David Bott

Sent from David Bott's desktop PC


locked Re: Extraordinary Obsolesce - Section Houses

darrell2010
 

Dave,

Do you have anything to backup your statement that "the biggest expense was payroll"?

Thanks,
Darrell Sawyer

On Friday, August 9, 2019, 05:38:44 PM MDT, A&Y Dave in MD <dbott@...> wrote:


This sounds as plausible as any theory.  There was the restructuring to simplify the corporate complexity to save money and deal with the funded debt that was due.  This would be another way to save money, and one that was pushed by mechanization and the growing cost of labor after WWII. The economy was growing, but competition was based on reducing labor costs. The unions were nearing their zenith in size and power and the cost per employee was getting higher.  Income wasn't growing quickly that long after WWII and the only way to improve profits was reducing expenses. The biggest expense was the payroll.  And once you reduce the payroll, why keep the supporting infrastructure?

Dave

Friday, August 9, 2019, 11:37:01 AM, you wrote:


Ike:

My sense is that mechanization was a major driver in the reduction, or elimination, of MofW section gangs and the need for section houses. I’d like to see some documentation of this hunch, but Southern, like most other railroads in the 1950s, realized that they no longer needed section gangs every five to ten miles to maintain a given section of track. The sections were expanded in size when routine labor-intensive functions, such as spike driving, tie replacement, or ballast regulating, were economically performed by machines. While mechanization probably came to the large system gangs first, it did eventually trickle down to the sections.

One other consideration was the sense that a pretty railroad was not necessarily a cost-efficient railroad. We all love to see images of main line trains on rock ballasted track with a knife-edge definition to the ballast line. Restoring the roadbed to this condition after routine maintenance was, in the old days, performed manually with shovels and a large straight-edge - it was called dressing the track. As the 1950s progressed, that knife-edge appearance disappeared, not only because of deferred maintenance, but because the railroad no longer believed it needed a pretty right of way.

Another consideration is vegetation control. In the days of sections, weeds and brush were manually cleared to the right-of-way line - maybe 100’ on each side of the track - to prevent fires from passing steam locomotives. Section hands used picks and shovels and maybe scythes or sickles in this process. Once the steam engines disappeared, many railroads, Southern included, stopped clearing brush and weeds by hand, and depended on chemicals from weed spray trains to control stuff growing between, and just outside, the rails. In the Brosnan era, Southern even economized on weed control, spraying diesel fuel on the weeds instead of a specialty chemical. A review of photos of Southern trains from the 1960s will show that diesel fuel was largely ineffective on weeds, and the track and right-of-way really looked ratty.

All factors mentioned above made the old style section gangs - where you had a gang of five or six men and a foreman assigned to a section, which covered five to ten miles of track - an unnecessary luxury. Not all of the massive layoffs among the MofW forces in the 1950s were due to mechanization of the big gangs. Many men from the local section gangs were laid off too.

—Bill  


On Aug 9, 2019, at 7:16 AM, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

Two days of work in the SRHA archives has turned up yet another category of Southern Railway data...and a question.

After WWII, there were a number of "programs" that included the retirement of various structures and facilities. Memos show at least 20 different programs but a comprehensive list has not been found. One large system wide program identified structures and tracks no longer needed because of dieselization. Lists of items were prepared, then reviewed to determine which would be removed. Not every item made the final list, for example if a track used to service steam locos was also being used for diesels it would be taken off the list. The timing of the dieselization list is obvious, when a division stopped using steam. That list included all roundhouses, turntables, and coal and water stations as well as any stem rerlated tracks and "appurtenances".

The time of another "program" is not clear. 1951 appears to be when the Southern decided section houses were no longer needed. Can anyone suggest what happened in 1949-51 for the railroad to make the decision to dispose of many section houses: a new labor agreement, an ICC ruling, changes in tax laws?

There are several drawings and many photos of section houses in the SRHA archives, certainly enough for a comprehensive TIES article. I've attached one example of the documents used to sell company property. Although I have always been aware that section houses and depots were sold and then removed from railroad property, the proportion of "sold" properties is much higher than expected. The attached sale document may explain why, even in 1951 dollars, $65 to purchase a house, coal shed and outhouse is a good price, even considering they had to be removed from Southern property in most cases.

Although many section houses were constructed in the 1880s and 90s, some survive today as residences.

Ike <French Lick, IN  section house 79-EB-1.jpg>



--
David Bott

Sent from David Bott's desktop PC


locked Re: Extraordinary Obsolesce - Section Houses

A&Y Dave in MD
 

This sounds as plausible as any theory.  There was the restructuring to simplify the corporate complexity to save money and deal with the funded debt that was due.  This would be another way to save money, and one that was pushed by mechanization and the growing cost of labor after WWII. The economy was growing, but competition was based on reducing labor costs. The unions were nearing their zenith in size and power and the cost per employee was getting higher.  Income wasn't growing quickly that long after WWII and the only way to improve profits was reducing expenses. The biggest expense was the payroll.  And once you reduce the payroll, why keep the supporting infrastructure?

Dave

Friday, August 9, 2019, 11:37:01 AM, you wrote:


Ike:

My sense is that mechanization was a major driver in the reduction, or elimination, of MofW section gangs and the need for section houses. I’d like to see some documentation of this hunch, but Southern, like most other railroads in the 1950s, realized that they no longer needed section gangs every five to ten miles to maintain a given section of track. The sections were expanded in size when routine labor-intensive functions, such as spike driving, tie replacement, or ballast regulating, were economically performed by machines. While mechanization probably came to the large system gangs first, it did eventually trickle down to the sections.

One other consideration was the sense that a pretty railroad was not necessarily a cost-efficient railroad. We all love to see images of main line trains on rock ballasted track with a knife-edge definition to the ballast line. Restoring the roadbed to this condition after routine maintenance was, in the old days, performed manually with shovels and a large straight-edge - it was called dressing the track. As the 1950s progressed, that knife-edge appearance disappeared, not only because of deferred maintenance, but because the railroad no longer believed it needed a pretty right of way.

Another consideration is vegetation control. In the days of sections, weeds and brush were manually cleared to the right-of-way line - maybe 100’ on each side of the track - to prevent fires from passing steam locomotives. Section hands used picks and shovels and maybe scythes or sickles in this process. Once the steam engines disappeared, many railroads, Southern included, stopped clearing brush and weeds by hand, and depended on chemicals from weed spray trains to control stuff growing between, and just outside, the rails. In the Brosnan era, Southern even economized on weed control, spraying diesel fuel on the weeds instead of a specialty chemical. A review of photos of Southern trains from the 1960s will show that diesel fuel was largely ineffective on weeds, and the track and right-of-way really looked ratty.

All factors mentioned above made the old style section gangs - where you had a gang of five or six men and a foreman assigned to a section, which covered five to ten miles of track - an unnecessary luxury. Not all of the massive layoffs among the MofW forces in the 1950s were due to mechanization of the big gangs. Many men from the local section gangs were laid off too.

—Bill  


On Aug 9, 2019, at 7:16 AM, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

Two days of work in the SRHA archives has turned up yet another category of Southern Railway data...and a question.

After WWII, there were a number of "programs" that included the retirement of various structures and facilities. Memos show at least 20 different programs but a comprehensive list has not been found. One large system wide program identified structures and tracks no longer needed because of dieselization. Lists of items were prepared, then reviewed to determine which would be removed. Not every item made the final list, for example if a track used to service steam locos was also being used for diesels it would be taken off the list. The timing of the dieselization list is obvious, when a division stopped using steam. That list included all roundhouses, turntables, and coal and water stations as well as any stem rerlated tracks and "appurtenances".

The time of another "program" is not clear. 1951 appears to be when the Southern decided section houses were no longer needed. Can anyone suggest what happened in 1949-51 for the railroad to make the decision to dispose of many section houses: a new labor agreement, an ICC ruling, changes in tax laws?

There are several drawings and many photos of section houses in the SRHA archives, certainly enough for a comprehensive TIES article. I've attached one example of the documents used to sell company property. Although I have always been aware that section houses and depots were sold and then removed from railroad property, the proportion of "sold" properties is much higher than expected. The attached sale document may explain why, even in 1951 dollars, $65 to purchase a house, coal shed and outhouse is a good price, even considering they had to be removed from Southern property in most cases.

Although many section houses were constructed in the 1880s and 90s, some survive today as residences.

Ike <French Lick, IN  section house 79-EB-1.jpg>



--
David Bott

Sent from David Bott's desktop PC


locked Re: Low side gons

A&Y Dave in MD
 

I am a 1/87 scale modeler.  

The problem with Speedwitch kits is that they aren't making any (Ted has a full time job in NY and I don't want to wish him to be unemployed again, even if it would mean more kits).

I only have one of each, and the kit boxes read 1937 and 1938 build dates.  I have no idea what keeps them from being used for earlier versions, but I am guessing it is "cast in" to the kit body, not just a detail, or the box would claim the cars go back to the earliest build dates of '24.   I'll have to get them out and see if I can compare to the photos on the Duke University construction archive (there are several SOU low side gons from late '20s era in that archive--the only photos from the era I've seen except for the one fuzzy one in the Southern Railway Handbook).

Dave

Wednesday, August 7, 2019, 2:20:01 PM, you wrote:


The question is scale. Jim King knows that my interest is S, presumably David and Dan are HO and Jim has re-entered the O-scale market.

Jack Wyatt

On Wednesday, August 7, 2019, 02:14:04 PM EDT, Dan Miller <danieljmiller@...> wrote:


I'll add to Jack and Dave's interest in an un-rebuilt gon kit.

Dan Miller

On Wed, Aug 7, 2019 at 10:35 AM A&Y Dave in MD <
dbott@...> wrote:

Jack has a more direct way of getting to the point...so I’ll follow his lead:

Anything for 1934?

Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

On Aug 7, 2019, at 12:40 PM, C J Wyatt <
cjwyatt@...> wrote:


Any hope of producing a kit of the un-rebuilt  car?

Jack


On Wednesday, August 7, 2019, 12:32:05 PM EDT, Jim King <
jimking3@...> wrote:


Not all 9-ribbers were rebuilt in 1945; some lasted as-built well into the 60s based on photos.
 
Jim King
www.smokymountainmodelworks.com
 

--
Jim King
www.smokymountainmodelworks.com



--
David Bott

Sent from David Bott's desktop PC


locked Re: Extraordinary Obsolesce - Section Houses

Bill Schafer
 

Ike:

My sense is that mechanization was a major driver in the reduction, or elimination, of MofW section gangs and the need for section houses. I’d like to see some documentation of this hunch, but Southern, like most other railroads in the 1950s, realized that they no longer needed section gangs every five to ten miles to maintain a given section of track. The sections were expanded in size when routine labor-intensive functions, such as spike driving, tie replacement, or ballast regulating, were economically performed by machines. While mechanization probably came to the large system gangs first, it did eventually trickle down to the sections. 

One other consideration was the sense that a pretty railroad was not necessarily a cost-efficient railroad. We all love to see images of main line trains on rock ballasted track with a knife-edge definition to the ballast line. Restoring the roadbed to this condition after routine maintenance was, in the old days, performed manually with shovels and a large straight-edge - it was called dressing the track. As the 1950s progressed, that knife-edge appearance disappeared, not only because of deferred maintenance, but because the railroad no longer believed it needed a pretty right of way. 

Another consideration is vegetation control. In the days of sections, weeds and brush were manually cleared to the right-of-way line - maybe 100’ on each side of the track - to prevent fires from passing steam locomotives. Section hands used picks and shovels and maybe scythes or sickles in this process. Once the steam engines disappeared, many railroads, Southern included, stopped clearing brush and weeds by hand, and depended on chemicals from weed spray trains to control stuff growing between, and just outside, the rails. In the Brosnan era, Southern even economized on weed control, spraying diesel fuel on the weeds instead of a specialty chemical. A review of photos of Southern trains from the 1960s will show that diesel fuel was largely ineffective on weeds, and the track and right-of-way really looked ratty. 

All factors mentioned above made the old style section gangs - where you had a gang of five or six men and a foreman assigned to a section, which covered five to ten miles of track - an unnecessary luxury. Not all of the massive layoffs among the MofW forces in the 1950s were due to mechanization of the big gangs. Many men from the local section gangs were laid off too. 

—Bill  

On Aug 9, 2019, at 7:16 AM, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

Two days of work in the SRHA archives has turned up yet another category of Southern Railway data...and a question.

After WWII, there were a number of "programs" that included the retirement of various structures and facilities. Memos show at least 20 different programs but a comprehensive list has not been found. One large system wide program identified structures and tracks no longer needed because of dieselization. Lists of items were prepared, then reviewed to determine which would be removed. Not every item made the final list, for example if a track used to service steam locos was also being used for diesels it would be taken off the list. The timing of the dieselization list is obvious, when a division stopped using steam. That list included all roundhouses, turntables, and coal and water stations as well as any stem rerlated tracks and "appurtenances".

The time of another "program" is not clear. 1951 appears to be when the Southern decided section houses were no longer needed. Can anyone suggest what happened in 1949-51 for the railroad to make the decision to dispose of many section houses: a new labor agreement, an ICC ruling, changes in tax laws?

There are several drawings and many photos of section houses in the SRHA archives, certainly enough for a comprehensive TIES article. I've attached one example of the documents used to sell company property. Although I have always been aware that section houses and depots were sold and then removed from railroad property, the proportion of "sold" properties is much higher than expected. The attached sale document may explain why, even in 1951 dollars, $65 to purchase a house, coal shed and outhouse is a good price, even considering they had to be removed from Southern property in most cases.

Although many section houses were constructed in the 1880s and 90s, some survive today as residences.

Ike <French Lick, IN  section house 79-EB-1.jpg>


locked Extraordinary Obsolesce - Section Houses

George Eichelberger
 

Two days of work in the SRHA archives has turned up yet another category of Southern Railway data...and a question.

After WWII, there were a number of "programs" that included the retirement of various structures and facilities. Memos show at least 20 different programs but a comprehensive list has not been found. One large system wide program identified structures and tracks no longer needed because of dieselization. Lists of items were prepared, then reviewed to determine which would be removed. Not every item made the final list, for example if a track used to service steam locos was also being used for diesels it would be taken off the list. The timing of the dieselization list is obvious, when a division stopped using steam. That list included all roundhouses, turntables, and coal and water stations as well as any stem rerlated tracks and "appurtenances".

The time of another "program" is not clear. 1951 appears to be when the Southern decided section houses were no longer needed. Can anyone suggest what happened in 1949-51 for the railroad to make the decision to dispose of many section houses: a new labor agreement, an ICC ruling, changes in tax laws?

There are several drawings and many photos of section houses in the SRHA archives, certainly enough for a comprehensive TIES article. I've attached one example of the documents used to sell company property. Although I have always been aware that section houses and depots were sold and then removed from railroad property, the proportion of "sold" properties is much higher than expected. The attached sale document may explain why, even in 1951 dollars, $65 to purchase a house, coal shed and outhouse is a good price, even considering they had to be removed from Southern property in most cases.

Although many section houses were constructed in the 1880s and 90s, some survive today as residences.

Ike


locked Re: Low side gons

Jim King
 

Speedwitch is the only other source for HO Southern low side gon kits besides mine (that were sold only thru SRHA).  Like most of Speedwitch’s kits, you have to find them on the secondary market.  Ted’s was a 9-rib version with 2-rib ends and suitable for 1924-ish into the 70s in MOW service.

 

Jim King

www.smokymountainmodelworks.com

 


--
Jim King
www.smokymountainmodelworks.com


locked Re: Enoree River

Curt Fortenberry
 


The CofG #665 is one of the cars that came to Alaska RR. 

Curt Fortenberry 


locked Re: Low side gons

C J Wyatt
 

The question is scale. Jim King knows that my interest is S, presumably David and Dan are HO and Jim has re-entered the O-scale market.

Jack Wyatt

On Wednesday, August 7, 2019, 02:14:04 PM EDT, Dan Miller <danieljmiller@...> wrote:


I'll add to Jack and Dave's interest in an un-rebuilt gon kit.

Dan Miller

On Wed, Aug 7, 2019 at 10:35 AM A&Y Dave in MD <dbott@...> wrote:
Jack has a more direct way of getting to the point...so I’ll follow his lead:

Anything for 1934?

Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

On Aug 7, 2019, at 12:40 PM, C J Wyatt <cjwyatt@...> wrote:

Any hope of producing a kit of the un-rebuilt  car?

Jack


On Wednesday, August 7, 2019, 12:32:05 PM EDT, Jim King <jimking3@...> wrote:


Not all 9-ribbers were rebuilt in 1945; some lasted as-built well into the 60s based on photos.

 

Jim King

www.smokymountainmodelworks.com

 


--
Jim King
www.smokymountainmodelworks.com


locked Re: Low side gons

Dan Miller
 

I'll add to Jack and Dave's interest in an un-rebuilt gon kit.

Dan Miller


On Wed, Aug 7, 2019 at 10:35 AM A&Y Dave in MD <dbott@...> wrote:
Jack has a more direct way of getting to the point...so I’ll follow his lead:

Anything for 1934?

Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

On Aug 7, 2019, at 12:40 PM, C J Wyatt <cjwyatt@...> wrote:

Any hope of producing a kit of the un-rebuilt  car?

Jack


On Wednesday, August 7, 2019, 12:32:05 PM EDT, Jim King <jimking3@...> wrote:


Not all 9-ribbers were rebuilt in 1945; some lasted as-built well into the 60s based on photos.

 

Jim King

www.smokymountainmodelworks.com

 


--
Jim King
www.smokymountainmodelworks.com


locked Re: Low side gons

A&Y Dave in MD
 

Jack has a more direct way of getting to the point...so I’ll follow his lead:

Anything for 1934?

Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

On Aug 7, 2019, at 12:40 PM, C J Wyatt <cjwyatt@...> wrote:

Any hope of producing a kit of the un-rebuilt  car?

Jack


On Wednesday, August 7, 2019, 12:32:05 PM EDT, Jim King <jimking3@...> wrote:


Not all 9-ribbers were rebuilt in 1945; some lasted as-built well into the 60s based on photos.

 

Jim King

www.smokymountainmodelworks.com

 


--
Jim King
www.smokymountainmodelworks.com


locked Re: Enoree River

Kevin Centers
 

The pictures went to Charlie Poling and Chris Williams. Their company, East Tn Railcar owns the car. It is currently in storage awaiting restoration.  It’s safe and in a good home. 

On Aug 7, 2019, at 12:10 PM, Ed Mims <wemims@...> wrote:

Kevin,

 

Thanks for the info. I sent all of the photos in my collection of the Fort Benning (interior and exterior) to someone at SARM and I’m now wondering what the status of that car is. I believe it was owned by two of the SARM members who planned to restore it. Do you know who this was and what progress they have made? I lost my record of who the photos went to.

 

Ed

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io [mailto:main@SouthernRailway.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin Centers
Sent: Wednesday, August 07, 2019 11:55 AM
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River

 

Ed

 

That photo was taken in Oak Ridge at SARM. When we received the car it didn’t look that good. With a lot of work by our volunteer staff, the car was restored to match the Fort Oglethorpe, also at SARM. Both cars made it to Southern and both wore the standard (by that time) Southern black roof and monogram. And both retained their names. They are very noticeable in Southern passenger train pictures because of their skirts. 

In another note, the building in the background is a gaseous diffusion enrichment facility to produce bomb-grade material. It was torn down several years ago, along with most of the buildings at the former K-25 facility. 

 

Kevin

 

 


On Aug 7, 2019, at 11:12 AM, Ed Mims <wemims@...> wrote:

Ed, Thanks for the photo. I have not seen this and was not aware that the car kept its name and number into the Southern era. The 54-seat Budd coaches were very nice cars. Thank you very much.

 

Ed Mims

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io [mailto:main@SouthernRailway.groups.io] On Behalf Of Edwin Locklin
Sent: Wednesday, August 07, 2019 11:02 AM
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River

 

Mr. Mims,

 

I happen to have the attached photo of #665 with painted black smooth roof and ‘Fort McPherson’ on the nameplate.  Enjoy!

 

Ed Locklin at mp367.

 


 

 

From: Ed Mims

Sent: Tuesday, August 06, 2019 8:25 PM

Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River

 

Kevin,

 

I’ve been searching my files to find a photo of 665 after repairs were made but must not have one. I’m beginning to believe that you are correct in that Southern applied the smooth roof but I have always thought differently. I recall the car coming into Jacksonville in about 1965 on the Ponce de Leon with a smooth roof and with Central of Georgia still on the letter board.

 

Ed

 

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io [mailto:main@SouthernRailway.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin Centers
Sent: Tuesday, August 06, 2019 8:12 PM
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River

 

Ed

 

You wouldn’t happen to have a picture of the car post wreck but prior to going to Southern?  I don’t, but would love to see it.

I question that Budd applied the smooth roof, primarily because they would still have the tooling set up to remove the damaged portions of the original roof and replace them with fluted material.  In looking at some of the repairs done on the car by Budd, they pretty well stuck to their going practice at the time-which meant fluted roofs all the way through the Amfleet cars. Not saying it didn’t happen, but my bet is Southern did it since other Budds in the fleet received the same treatment.

 

Kevin


On Aug 6, 2019, at 8:01 PM, Ed Mims <wemims@...> wrote:

The CofGa car 665 (formerly Fort McPherson) was wrecked and repaired by Budd. That is why it has a smooth stainless steel roof. See attachment.

 

Stainless steel does not corrode but it is not totally indestructible. Stainless steel will fatigue in service and fracture (crack). Once this begins it is irreversible. The pre-war cars had this problem with the early design of center sills. Later designs were heavier and stayed in regular service for many years. Post war cars were much sturdier and some remain in service today (example:  VIA RAIL  THE CANADIAN).

 

Ed Mims

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io [mailto:main@SouthernRailway.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin Centers
Sent: Tuesday, August 06, 2019 7:21 PM
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River

 

Curt

 

Budds were built with fluted roofs. Being of all stainless construction, the cars were-and in many cases still are-practically indestructible. Unfortunately they leak. Sometimes a little silicon will do the trick, but some are a little worse. Southern fixed the issue by applying smooth stainless over the flutes. SOU 665 (former CofGa 665) at Southern Appalachia Ry Museum is a good example of this. Built by Budd with a fluted roof with smooth panels applied by Southern.

 

Kevin


On Aug 6, 2019, at 7:02 PM, Curt Fortenberry <curtfortenberry@...> wrote:


Alaska RR got several of the SR coaches (one CofG) after Amtrak took over the Crescent (all Budd built).   Roofs varied among the lot.  Some fluted roofs, some smooth (were these replacement roofs?).  Some natural metal, some black. 

Photos can be found here:  http://www.alaskarails.org/fp/passenger/passenger-roster-retired.html   Scroll down to the 5200 group.

Curt Fortenberry

<CG Fort McPherson WEM 010.jpg>

<CG CofGa Railway Passenger Equipment (March 2 1955) 058.tif>


locked Re: Low side gons

C J Wyatt
 

Any hope of producing a kit of the un-rebuilt  car?

Jack


On Wednesday, August 7, 2019, 12:32:05 PM EDT, Jim King <jimking3@...> wrote:


Not all 9-ribbers were rebuilt in 1945; some lasted as-built well into the 60s based on photos.

 

Jim King

www.smokymountainmodelworks.com

 


--
Jim King
www.smokymountainmodelworks.com


locked Re: Low side gons

Jim King
 

Not all 9-ribbers were rebuilt in 1945; some lasted as-built well into the 60s based on photos.

 

Jim King

www.smokymountainmodelworks.com

 


--
Jim King
www.smokymountainmodelworks.com


locked Re: Enoree River

Ed Mims
 

Kevin,

 

Thanks for the info. I sent all of the photos in my collection of the Fort Benning (interior and exterior) to someone at SARM and I’m now wondering what the status of that car is. I believe it was owned by two of the SARM members who planned to restore it. Do you know who this was and what progress they have made? I lost my record of who the photos went to.

 

Ed

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io [mailto:main@SouthernRailway.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin Centers
Sent: Wednesday, August 07, 2019 11:55 AM
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River

 

Ed

 

That photo was taken in Oak Ridge at SARM. When we received the car it didn’t look that good. With a lot of work by our volunteer staff, the car was restored to match the Fort Oglethorpe, also at SARM. Both cars made it to Southern and both wore the standard (by that time) Southern black roof and monogram. And both retained their names. They are very noticeable in Southern passenger train pictures because of their skirts. 

In another note, the building in the background is a gaseous diffusion enrichment facility to produce bomb-grade material. It was torn down several years ago, along with most of the buildings at the former K-25 facility. 

 

Kevin

 

 


On Aug 7, 2019, at 11:12 AM, Ed Mims <wemims@...> wrote:

Ed, Thanks for the photo. I have not seen this and was not aware that the car kept its name and number into the Southern era. The 54-seat Budd coaches were very nice cars. Thank you very much.

 

Ed Mims

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io [mailto:main@SouthernRailway.groups.io] On Behalf Of Edwin Locklin
Sent: Wednesday, August 07, 2019 11:02 AM
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River

 

Mr. Mims,

 

I happen to have the attached photo of #665 with painted black smooth roof and ‘Fort McPherson’ on the nameplate.  Enjoy!

 

Ed Locklin at mp367.

 


 

 

From: Ed Mims

Sent: Tuesday, August 06, 2019 8:25 PM

Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River

 

Kevin,

 

I’ve been searching my files to find a photo of 665 after repairs were made but must not have one. I’m beginning to believe that you are correct in that Southern applied the smooth roof but I have always thought differently. I recall the car coming into Jacksonville in about 1965 on the Ponce de Leon with a smooth roof and with Central of Georgia still on the letter board.

 

Ed

 

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io [mailto:main@SouthernRailway.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin Centers
Sent: Tuesday, August 06, 2019 8:12 PM
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River

 

Ed

 

You wouldn’t happen to have a picture of the car post wreck but prior to going to Southern?  I don’t, but would love to see it.

I question that Budd applied the smooth roof, primarily because they would still have the tooling set up to remove the damaged portions of the original roof and replace them with fluted material.  In looking at some of the repairs done on the car by Budd, they pretty well stuck to their going practice at the time-which meant fluted roofs all the way through the Amfleet cars. Not saying it didn’t happen, but my bet is Southern did it since other Budds in the fleet received the same treatment.

 

Kevin


On Aug 6, 2019, at 8:01 PM, Ed Mims <wemims@...> wrote:

The CofGa car 665 (formerly Fort McPherson) was wrecked and repaired by Budd. That is why it has a smooth stainless steel roof. See attachment.

 

Stainless steel does not corrode but it is not totally indestructible. Stainless steel will fatigue in service and fracture (crack). Once this begins it is irreversible. The pre-war cars had this problem with the early design of center sills. Later designs were heavier and stayed in regular service for many years. Post war cars were much sturdier and some remain in service today (example:  VIA RAIL  THE CANADIAN).

 

Ed Mims

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io [mailto:main@SouthernRailway.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin Centers
Sent: Tuesday, August 06, 2019 7:21 PM
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River

 

Curt

 

Budds were built with fluted roofs. Being of all stainless construction, the cars were-and in many cases still are-practically indestructible. Unfortunately they leak. Sometimes a little silicon will do the trick, but some are a little worse. Southern fixed the issue by applying smooth stainless over the flutes. SOU 665 (former CofGa 665) at Southern Appalachia Ry Museum is a good example of this. Built by Budd with a fluted roof with smooth panels applied by Southern.

 

Kevin


On Aug 6, 2019, at 7:02 PM, Curt Fortenberry <curtfortenberry@...> wrote:


Alaska RR got several of the SR coaches (one CofG) after Amtrak took over the Crescent (all Budd built).   Roofs varied among the lot.  Some fluted roofs, some smooth (were these replacement roofs?).  Some natural metal, some black. 

Photos can be found here:  http://www.alaskarails.org/fp/passenger/passenger-roster-retired.html   Scroll down to the 5200 group.

Curt Fortenberry

<CG Fort McPherson WEM 010.jpg>

<CG CofGa Railway Passenger Equipment (March 2 1955) 058.tif>


locked Re: Enoree River

Kevin Centers
 

Ed

That photo was taken in Oak Ridge at SARM. When we received the car it didn’t look that good. With a lot of work by our volunteer staff, the car was restored to match the Fort Oglethorpe, also at SARM. Both cars made it to Southern and both wore the standard (by that time) Southern black roof and monogram. And both retained their names. They are very noticeable in Southern passenger train pictures because of their skirts. 
In another note, the building in the background is a gaseous diffusion enrichment facility to produce bomb-grade material. It was torn down several years ago, along with most of the buildings at the former K-25 facility. 

Kevin



On Aug 7, 2019, at 11:12 AM, Ed Mims <wemims@...> wrote:

Ed, Thanks for the photo. I have not seen this and was not aware that the car kept its name and number into the Southern era. The 54-seat Budd coaches were very nice cars. Thank you very much.

 

Ed Mims

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io [mailto:main@SouthernRailway.groups.io] On Behalf Of Edwin Locklin
Sent: Wednesday, August 07, 2019 11:02 AM
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River

 

Mr. Mims,

 

I happen to have the attached photo of #665 with painted black smooth roof and ‘Fort McPherson’ on the nameplate.  Enjoy!

 

Ed Locklin at mp367.

 


 

 

From: Ed Mims

Sent: Tuesday, August 06, 2019 8:25 PM

Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River

 

Kevin,

 

I’ve been searching my files to find a photo of 665 after repairs were made but must not have one. I’m beginning to believe that you are correct in that Southern applied the smooth roof but I have always thought differently. I recall the car coming into Jacksonville in about 1965 on the Ponce de Leon with a smooth roof and with Central of Georgia still on the letter board.

 

Ed

 

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io [mailto:main@SouthernRailway.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin Centers
Sent: Tuesday, August 06, 2019 8:12 PM
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River

 

Ed

 

You wouldn’t happen to have a picture of the car post wreck but prior to going to Southern?  I don’t, but would love to see it.

I question that Budd applied the smooth roof, primarily because they would still have the tooling set up to remove the damaged portions of the original roof and replace them with fluted material.  In looking at some of the repairs done on the car by Budd, they pretty well stuck to their going practice at the time-which meant fluted roofs all the way through the Amfleet cars. Not saying it didn’t happen, but my bet is Southern did it since other Budds in the fleet received the same treatment.

 

Kevin


On Aug 6, 2019, at 8:01 PM, Ed Mims <wemims@...> wrote:

The CofGa car 665 (formerly Fort McPherson) was wrecked and repaired by Budd. That is why it has a smooth stainless steel roof. See attachment.

 

Stainless steel does not corrode but it is not totally indestructible. Stainless steel will fatigue in service and fracture (crack). Once this begins it is irreversible. The pre-war cars had this problem with the early design of center sills. Later designs were heavier and stayed in regular service for many years. Post war cars were much sturdier and some remain in service today (example:  VIA RAIL  THE CANADIAN).

 

Ed Mims

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io [mailto:main@SouthernRailway.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin Centers
Sent: Tuesday, August 06, 2019 7:21 PM
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River

 

Curt

 

Budds were built with fluted roofs. Being of all stainless construction, the cars were-and in many cases still are-practically indestructible. Unfortunately they leak. Sometimes a little silicon will do the trick, but some are a little worse. Southern fixed the issue by applying smooth stainless over the flutes. SOU 665 (former CofGa 665) at Southern Appalachia Ry Museum is a good example of this. Built by Budd with a fluted roof with smooth panels applied by Southern.

 

Kevin


On Aug 6, 2019, at 7:02 PM, Curt Fortenberry <curtfortenberry@...> wrote:


Alaska RR got several of the SR coaches (one CofG) after Amtrak took over the Crescent (all Budd built).   Roofs varied among the lot.  Some fluted roofs, some smooth (were these replacement roofs?).  Some natural metal, some black. 

Photos can be found here:  http://www.alaskarails.org/fp/passenger/passenger-roster-retired.html   Scroll down to the 5200 group.

Curt Fortenberry

<CG Fort McPherson WEM 010.jpg>

<CG CofGa Railway Passenger Equipment (March 2 1955) 058.tif>


locked Re: Enoree River

Ed Mims
 

Ed, Thanks for the photo. I have not seen this and was not aware that the car kept its name and number into the Southern era. The 54-seat Budd coaches were very nice cars. Thank you very much.

 

Ed Mims

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io [mailto:main@SouthernRailway.groups.io] On Behalf Of Edwin Locklin
Sent: Wednesday, August 07, 2019 11:02 AM
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River

 

Mr. Mims,

 

I happen to have the attached photo of #665 with painted black smooth roof and ‘Fort McPherson’ on the nameplate.  Enjoy!

 

Ed Locklin at mp367.

 


 

 

From: Ed Mims

Sent: Tuesday, August 06, 2019 8:25 PM

To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io

Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River

 

Kevin,

 

I’ve been searching my files to find a photo of 665 after repairs were made but must not have one. I’m beginning to believe that you are correct in that Southern applied the smooth roof but I have always thought differently. I recall the car coming into Jacksonville in about 1965 on the Ponce de Leon with a smooth roof and with Central of Georgia still on the letter board.

 

Ed

 

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io [mailto:main@SouthernRailway.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin Centers
Sent: Tuesday, August 06, 2019 8:12 PM
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River

 

Ed

 

You wouldn’t happen to have a picture of the car post wreck but prior to going to Southern?  I don’t, but would love to see it.

I question that Budd applied the smooth roof, primarily because they would still have the tooling set up to remove the damaged portions of the original roof and replace them with fluted material.  In looking at some of the repairs done on the car by Budd, they pretty well stuck to their going practice at the time-which meant fluted roofs all the way through the Amfleet cars. Not saying it didn’t happen, but my bet is Southern did it since other Budds in the fleet received the same treatment.

 

Kevin


On Aug 6, 2019, at 8:01 PM, Ed Mims <wemims@...> wrote:

The CofGa car 665 (formerly Fort McPherson) was wrecked and repaired by Budd. That is why it has a smooth stainless steel roof. See attachment.

 

Stainless steel does not corrode but it is not totally indestructible. Stainless steel will fatigue in service and fracture (crack). Once this begins it is irreversible. The pre-war cars had this problem with the early design of center sills. Later designs were heavier and stayed in regular service for many years. Post war cars were much sturdier and some remain in service today (example:  VIA RAIL  THE CANADIAN).

 

Ed Mims

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io [mailto:main@SouthernRailway.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin Centers
Sent: Tuesday, August 06, 2019 7:21 PM
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River

 

Curt

 

Budds were built with fluted roofs. Being of all stainless construction, the cars were-and in many cases still are-practically indestructible. Unfortunately they leak. Sometimes a little silicon will do the trick, but some are a little worse. Southern fixed the issue by applying smooth stainless over the flutes. SOU 665 (former CofGa 665) at Southern Appalachia Ry Museum is a good example of this. Built by Budd with a fluted roof with smooth panels applied by Southern.

 

Kevin


On Aug 6, 2019, at 7:02 PM, Curt Fortenberry <curtfortenberry@...> wrote:


Alaska RR got several of the SR coaches (one CofG) after Amtrak took over the Crescent (all Budd built).   Roofs varied among the lot.  Some fluted roofs, some smooth (were these replacement roofs?).  Some natural metal, some black. 

Photos can be found here:  http://www.alaskarails.org/fp/passenger/passenger-roster-retired.html   Scroll down to the 5200 group.

Curt Fortenberry

<CG Fort McPherson WEM 010.jpg>


locked Re: Enoree River

 

Mr. Mims,
 
I happen to have the attached photo of #665 with painted black smooth roof and ‘Fort McPherson’ on the nameplate.  Enjoy!
 
Ed Locklin at mp367.
 

 
 

From: Ed Mims
Sent: Tuesday, August 06, 2019 8:25 PM
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River
 

Kevin,

 

I’ve been searching my files to find a photo of 665 after repairs were made but must not have one. I’m beginning to believe that you are correct in that Southern applied the smooth roof but I have always thought differently. I recall the car coming into Jacksonville in about 1965 on the Ponce de Leon with a smooth roof and with Central of Georgia still on the letter board.

 

Ed

 

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io [mailto:main@SouthernRailway.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin Centers
Sent: Tuesday, August 06, 2019 8:12 PM
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River

 

Ed

 

You wouldn’t happen to have a picture of the car post wreck but prior to going to Southern?  I don’t, but would love to see it.

I question that Budd applied the smooth roof, primarily because they would still have the tooling set up to remove the damaged portions of the original roof and replace them with fluted material.  In looking at some of the repairs done on the car by Budd, they pretty well stuck to their going practice at the time-which meant fluted roofs all the way through the Amfleet cars. Not saying it didn’t happen, but my bet is Southern did it since other Budds in the fleet received the same treatment.

 

Kevin


On Aug 6, 2019, at 8:01 PM, Ed Mims <wemims@...> wrote:

The CofGa car 665 (formerly Fort McPherson) was wrecked and repaired by Budd. That is why it has a smooth stainless steel roof. See attachment.

 

Stainless steel does not corrode but it is not totally indestructible. Stainless steel will fatigue in service and fracture (crack). Once this begins it is irreversible. The pre-war cars had this problem with the early design of center sills. Later designs were heavier and stayed in regular service for many years. Post war cars were much sturdier and some remain in service today (example:  VIA RAIL  THE CANADIAN).

 

Ed Mims

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io [mailto:main@SouthernRailway.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin Centers
Sent: Tuesday, August 06, 2019 7:21 PM
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River

 

Curt

 

Budds were built with fluted roofs. Being of all stainless construction, the cars were-and in many cases still are-practically indestructible. Unfortunately they leak. Sometimes a little silicon will do the trick, but some are a little worse. Southern fixed the issue by applying smooth stainless over the flutes. SOU 665 (former CofGa 665) at Southern Appalachia Ry Museum is a good example of this. Built by Budd with a fluted roof with smooth panels applied by Southern.

 

Kevin


On Aug 6, 2019, at 7:02 PM, Curt Fortenberry <curtfortenberry@...> wrote:


Alaska RR got several of the SR coaches (one CofG) after Amtrak took over the Crescent (all Budd built).   Roofs varied among the lot.  Some fluted roofs, some smooth (were these replacement roofs?).  Some natural metal, some black. 

Photos can be found here:  http://www.alaskarails.org/fp/passenger/passenger-roster-retired.html   Scroll down to the 5200 group.

Curt Fortenberry

<CG Fort McPherson WEM 010.jpg>


locked Re: Southern dining car 3307 and OC 5 to TVRM

Marv Clemons
 

I stand corrected. To further the argument, If you wanted the livery to be true to the car's original heritage, it would be in Pullman's two-tone grey as delivered to the SP.  Heritage aside, I appreciate your raitonale for wanting the car in Tuscan, otherwise your Summerville consist would resemble Amtrak's "early circus" color scheme.


locked Re: Enoree River

Ed Mims
 

Thanks Kevin. I’m interested in what you find out so please keep me informed.

 

The Central of Georgia did join Amtrak on April 1, 1971. This was a very controversial move by Southern as owner of the CofGa and not join themselves. This allowed the discontinuance of the Nancy Hanks, the Seminole and the City of Miami. The Man O’war had been discontinued previously--don’t recall the date. David Payne will know.

 

Ed

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io [mailto:main@SouthernRailway.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin Centers
Sent: Tuesday, August 06, 2019 8:33 PM
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River

 

Ed

 

I’m not saying I know it all, but since I’ve been working on helping get it restored for a while, I’m at least pretty familiar with it. And it’s twin the Fort Oglethorpe. Somewhere (there’s a big word) in the SRHA archives, the car files show it, the Mitchell and Oglethorpe going to Hayne shortly after the merger. Southern did work on the cars-which if memory serves was desperately needed by that time. It wasn’t until March of 1971 that the ownership of the Central cars was transferred to Southern. Probably in an attempt to preclude Amtrak from taking possession of them since I believe Central technically joined Amtrak on April 1. So it makes sense that Southern could have done the work prior to a change on the letterboard. 

 

Kevin

 

 


On Aug 6, 2019, at 8:25 PM, Ed Mims <wemims@...> wrote:

Kevin,

 

I’ve been searching my files to find a photo of 665 after repairs were made but must not have one. I’m beginning to believe that you are correct in that Southern applied the smooth roof but I have always thought differently. I recall the car coming into Jacksonville in about 1965 on the Ponce de Leon with a smooth roof and with Central of Georgia still on the letter board.

 

Ed

 

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io [mailto:main@SouthernRailway.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin Centers
Sent: Tuesday, August 06, 2019 8:12 PM
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River

 

Ed

 

You wouldn’t happen to have a picture of the car post wreck but prior to going to Southern?  I don’t, but would love to see it. 

I question that Budd applied the smooth roof, primarily because they would still have the tooling set up to remove the damaged portions of the original roof and replace them with fluted material.  In looking at some of the repairs done on the car by Budd, they pretty well stuck to their going practice at the time-which meant fluted roofs all the way through the Amfleet cars. Not saying it didn’t happen, but my bet is Southern did it since other Budds in the fleet received the same treatment. 

 

Kevin


On Aug 6, 2019, at 8:01 PM, Ed Mims <wemims@...> wrote:

The CofGa car 665 (formerly Fort McPherson) was wrecked and repaired by Budd. That is why it has a smooth stainless steel roof. See attachment.

 

Stainless steel does not corrode but it is not totally indestructible. Stainless steel will fatigue in service and fracture (crack). Once this begins it is irreversible. The pre-war cars had this problem with the early design of center sills. Later designs were heavier and stayed in regular service for many years. Post war cars were much sturdier and some remain in service today (example:  VIA RAIL  THE CANADIAN).

 

Ed Mims

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io [mailto:main@SouthernRailway.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin Centers
Sent: Tuesday, August 06, 2019 7:21 PM
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Enoree River

 

Curt

 

Budds were built with fluted roofs. Being of all stainless construction, the cars were-and in many cases still are-practically indestructible. Unfortunately they leak. Sometimes a little silicon will do the trick, but some are a little worse. Southern fixed the issue by applying smooth stainless over the flutes. SOU 665 (former CofGa 665) at Southern Appalachia Ry Museum is a good example of this. Built by Budd with a fluted roof with smooth panels applied by Southern. 

 

Kevin


On Aug 6, 2019, at 7:02 PM, Curt Fortenberry <curtfortenberry@...> wrote:


Alaska RR got several of the SR coaches (one CofG) after Amtrak took over the Crescent (all Budd built).   Roofs varied among the lot.  Some fluted roofs, some smooth (were these replacement roofs?).  Some natural metal, some black. 

Photos can be found here:  http://www.alaskarails.org/fp/passenger/passenger-roster-retired.html   Scroll down to the 5200 group.

Curt Fortenberry

<CG Fort McPherson WEM 010.jpg>

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