Date   
Re: Silversides lettering color

George Eichelberger
 

Here is a list of color Silversides photos I took over the years. If there is a “pattern” in them, it is that Silversides were delivered with Red lettering in 1960. Green lettering on (1973?) modified cars.

1022 at B’ham 2-8-84, blt 2-60, reinforced for rotary dump svc (probably) 5-73 at Knoxville - green lettering
1067 at Asheville 7-22-89. original blt date is not readable, lettering is red, in poor condition and looks to be original
1106 at B’ham, Norris Yd. 4-6-86 car reweighed, dim data restenciled, lettering is red, blt 2-60
1125 at Asheville 10-23-73, car modified and re-stenciled green, blt 2-60
1181 at B’ham 2-8-84, modified lettering, green lettering (looks original incl ACI label) blt 2-60
1265 at Asheville 7-22-89, not modified, red lettering (poor condition, looks original w/ACI label), dim data had been changed new inspection label recently added. blt 2-60
1351 at B’ham, unmodified, red lettering in poor condition, looks original w/ACI label, new inspection stencil recently added, blt 3-60
Note first “!” in car’s road number on side is completely obliterated, reads “351”
1363 at B’ham 10-1-82, car not modified, red lettering in poor condition, looks original w/ACI label, new inspection stencil recently added, blt 3-60
1375 at B’ham 4-6-86, car not modified, red lettering in poor condition, looks original w/ACI label, new inspection stencil recently added, dim data re-stenciled 3-86, blt 3-60
1377 at B’ham, car modified (4-79?), (dark) green lettering, blt 3-60
1430 at B’ham 2-8-84, car not modified, red lettering in poor condition, looks original w/ACI label, new inspection stencil recently added, blt 3-60
1539 at Asheville 10-23-73, modified 5-73, dark green or black lettering, blt 3-60
1656 at Birmingham 9-30-82, not modified, red lettering looks original, blt 3-60
1685 at B’ham 10-1-82, not modified, red lettering looks original, blt 4-60
1709 at Howells in Atlanta 10-28-83, not modified, red lettering, blt 3-60 (Note: car is not in unit train)

I have many more color photos of covered hoppers. Most are black or green lettering except Big Johns are either green or red. Nothing else in red may indicate that was not a “standard” color?

Ike

Re: Silversides lettering color

Dick Fisher
 

I agree. I always thought the color was whatever was standard at the time they were painted..

Dick

On 7/2/2020 8:54 AM, Bill Schafer wrote:
I have no idea why the gray 70 ton hoppers were painted that way, but I remember seeing them occasionally in Lamberts Point mixed in with black N&W hoppers in the 1980s. 

As for the Silversides, I’m like Jack Wyatt - I too am curious about the real answer. My impression over the years, which may be just wild speculation, is that Mr. Brosnan did everything he could to get rid of the color green on the Southern . Diesels traded green for black in 1958. The first airplane - N153SR, nicknamed the Southwind, was painted red and white with gold stripes when delivered around 1963. The Agribusiness bus was painted red and silver. And the Silversides, Big Johns, etc., were lettered with red-orange characters. All during Brosnan’s watch as either executive VP-operations or president. Once Mr. Claytor became president, the red on the plane got replaced by green; ditto (I think, IIRC) for the Agribusiness bus before it was retired. And it was during Claytor’s administration that I noticed the Silversides and Big Johns getting green characters instead of red-orange, so I just chalked it up to a trend to return to green, culminating with the E8s in 1972. 

If there is a more technical explanation, I’d be delighted to hear of it. 

—Bill

On Jul 1, 2020, at 22:54, Robert Graham <rgraham2@...> wrote:

He probably is referring to one of these cars; SOU (C of  G) HT 74338 I shot at Linwood NC April 19 1986.

Bob Graham

-----------------------------------------

From: "James"
To: "main@southernrailway.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday July 1 2020 10:23:24PM
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Silversides lettering color

George,

You sparked my interest with the grey 70ton hoppers with black lettering.  Might you provide some pictures fo these?

On Jul 1, 2020, at 20:13, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

Scott:

For years, I have looked at stencil drawings, specifications and memos to find a “clue” to explain the different stencil colors on the Silversides, covered hoppers and the grey 70-ton triple hoppers with black lettering. I have always assumed there must (!) be a reason for the black, green, red, (and orange that was probably faded red?). So far, absolutely no luck whatsoever!

We can speculate about many reasons but does anyone have any “solid” information?

Ike


James Wall
Rural Hall, NC



<SOU ht 74338  BobG  035.jpg>


Virus-free. www.avg.com

Re: Silversides lettering color

Bill Schafer
 

I have no idea why the gray 70 ton hoppers were painted that way, but I remember seeing them occasionally in Lamberts Point mixed in with black N&W hoppers in the 1980s. 

As for the Silversides, I’m like Jack Wyatt - I too am curious about the real answer. My impression over the years, which may be just wild speculation, is that Mr. Brosnan did everything he could to get rid of the color green on the Southern . Diesels traded green for black in 1958. The first airplane - N153SR, nicknamed the Southwind, was painted red and white with gold stripes when delivered around 1963. The Agribusiness bus was painted red and silver. And the Silversides, Big Johns, etc., were lettered with red-orange characters. All during Brosnan’s watch as either executive VP-operations or president. Once Mr. Claytor became president, the red on the plane got replaced by green; ditto (I think, IIRC) for the Agribusiness bus before it was retired. And it was during Claytor’s administration that I noticed the Silversides and Big Johns getting green characters instead of red-orange, so I just chalked it up to a trend to return to green, culminating with the E8s in 1972. 

If there is a more technical explanation, I’d be delighted to hear of it. 

—Bill

On Jul 1, 2020, at 22:54, Robert Graham <rgraham2@...> wrote:

He probably is referring to one of these cars; SOU (C of  G) HT 74338 I shot at Linwood NC April 19 1986.

Bob Graham

-----------------------------------------

From: "James"
To: "main@southernrailway.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday July 1 2020 10:23:24PM
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Silversides lettering color

George,

You sparked my interest with the grey 70ton hoppers with black lettering.  Might you provide some pictures fo these?

On Jul 1, 2020, at 20:13, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

Scott:

For years, I have looked at stencil drawings, specifications and memos to find a “clue” to explain the different stencil colors on the Silversides, covered hoppers and the grey 70-ton triple hoppers with black lettering. I have always assumed there must (!) be a reason for the black, green, red, (and orange that was probably faded red?). So far, absolutely no luck whatsoever!

We can speculate about many reasons but does anyone have any “solid” information?

Ike


James Wall
Rural Hall, NC



<SOU ht 74338  BobG  035.jpg>

Re: Silversides lettering color

Robert Graham
 

He probably is referring to one of these cars; SOU (C of  G) HT 74338 I shot at Linwood NC April 19 1986.

Bob Graham

-----------------------------------------

From: "James"
To: "main@southernrailway.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday July 1 2020 10:23:24PM
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Silversides lettering color

George,

You sparked my interest with the grey 70ton hoppers with black lettering.  Might you provide some pictures fo these?

On Jul 1, 2020, at 20:13, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

Scott:

For years, I have looked at stencil drawings, specifications and memos to find a “clue” to explain the different stencil colors on the Silversides, covered hoppers and the grey 70-ton triple hoppers with black lettering. I have always assumed there must (!) be a reason for the black, green, red, (and orange that was probably faded red?). So far, absolutely no luck whatsoever!

We can speculate about many reasons but does anyone have any “solid” information?

Ike


James Wall
Rural Hall, NC



Re: Silversides lettering color

George Eichelberger
 

Mike:

I’ve scanned maybe 4,000 hopper, cov hopper and Silversides drawings and memos…..nothing!

I expect many of the Silversides stencil color changes occurred when the cars were modified with steel replacement parts.
Many of the covered hopper orders left the carbuilders with Roman lettering or were rebuilt (70 to 100T) and were repainted. I guarantee no 70T open hopper specs said “grey paint”.

One problem with lettering, stencil drawings always say the same thing…..lettering as per specifications….but the specs never seem to include anything about lettering colors.

Ike

On Jul 1, 2020, at 9:34 PM, mike turner <michaellturner@...> wrote:

Given that the car vendors built (painted) exactly what SOU specified,
I would suggest a quick scan through the NCP folder for an order of
Silversides that had varying colors.

While it's not certain there will be a justification or reason in the
file, there is a pretty good chance some letter or note will give a
clue since something like that would normally pass through purchasing.

Re: Silversides lettering color

mike turner
 

Given that the car vendors built (painted) exactly what SOU specified,
I would suggest a quick scan through the NCP folder for an order of
Silversides that had varying colors.

While it's not certain there will be a justification or reason in the
file, there is a pretty good chance some letter or note will give a
clue since something like that would normally pass through purchasing.

Re: Silversides lettering color

George Eichelberger
 

Here are two. Only Sou 74505 is properly IDd. I took the photo at Andover, VA 10-2-87. Another photo, Sou 74285, may (!!) have faded green lettering

Ike




On Jul 1, 2020, at 8:36 PM, James <nsc39dash8@...> wrote:

George,

You sparked my interest with the grey 70ton hoppers with black lettering.  Might you provide some pictures fo these?

On Jul 1, 2020, at 20:13, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

Scott:

For years, I have looked at stencil drawings, specifications and memos to find a “clue” to explain the different stencil colors on the Silversides, covered hoppers and the grey 70-ton triple hoppers with black lettering. I have always assumed there must (!) be a reason for the black, green, red, (and orange that was probably faded red?). So far, absolutely no luck whatsoever!

We can speculate about many reasons but does anyone have any “solid” information?

Ike


James Wall
Rural Hall, NC




Re: Silversides lettering color

C J Wyatt
 

I always assumed that it was a search for a lettering color which would provide contrast on the TV screens in spite of any overcoating's of dust and grime.

Sorry to speculate, but after assuming this answer for the majority of my life, I am curious about the answer. 

Jack Wyatt

On Wednesday, July 1, 2020, 08:27:05 PM EDT, Curt Fortenberry <@arrphoto> wrote:






I would add the Magor hoppers as well.  

Curt Fortenberry

Re: Silversides lettering color

George Eichelberger
 

Because the covered hopper were first purchased for different commodities, I have always assumed that maybe the stencil colors on them were to show what they were supposed to carry. The problem with that theory is that stencil colors vary within the same car orders.

Ike



On Jul 1, 2020, at 8:24 PM, Curt Fortenberry <curtfortenberry@...> wrote:


I would add the Magor hoppers as well.  

Curt Fortenberry 

Re: Silversides lettering color

James
 

George,

You sparked my interest with the grey 70ton hoppers with black lettering.  Might you provide some pictures fo these?

On Jul 1, 2020, at 20:13, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

Scott:

For years, I have looked at stencil drawings, specifications and memos to find a “clue” to explain the different stencil colors on the Silversides, covered hoppers and the grey 70-ton triple hoppers with black lettering. I have always assumed there must (!) be a reason for the black, green, red, (and orange that was probably faded red?). So far, absolutely no luck whatsoever!

We can speculate about many reasons but does anyone have any “solid” information?

Ike


James Wall
Rural Hall, NC



Re: Silversides lettering color

Curt Fortenberry
 


I would add the Magor hoppers as well.  

Curt Fortenberry 

Re: Silversides lettering color

George Eichelberger
 

Scott:

For years, I have looked at stencil drawings, specifications and memos to find a “clue” to explain the different stencil colors on the Silversides, covered hoppers and the grey 70-ton triple hoppers with black lettering. I have always assumed there must (!) be a reason for the black, green, red, (and orange that was probably faded red?). So far, absolutely no luck whatsoever!

We can speculate about many reasons but does anyone have any “solid” information?

Ike


On Jul 1, 2020, at 7:02 PM, D. Scott Chatfield <blindog@...> wrote:

What were the different colors used to letter the Silversides?  (The aluminum coal gons.)  I gather the colors had meanings, either for which power company they hauled coal for or which subsidiary they were assigned to.  Thanks.


Scott Chatfield

Silversides lettering color

D. Scott Chatfield
 

What were the different colors used to letter the Silversides?  (The aluminum coal gons.)  I gather the colors had meanings, either for which power company they hauled coal for or which subsidiary they were assigned to.  Thanks.


Scott Chatfield

Re: Mose Siskin part 2

Robert Hanson
 

Warren, that pretty well agrees with what I've heard and read.

Siskin bought the TAG basically to give the Southern the single-finger salute.

And apparently did so successfully.

Bob Hanson
Loganville, GA


-----Original Message-----
From: Warren Stephens <wdstephens@...>
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Jul 1, 2020 6:19 pm
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Mose Siskin part 2

Southern only began to pay the TAG any real attention after WW2. TAG traffic levels increased after the war and as the TAG's primary northern outlet from Chattanooga this miffed Southern. Because as you said the Southern could have handled anything TAG and L&N handled jointly. In the mid 50s, Southern did try and bully TAG out of business. Backfired on them in a dramatic fashion. It was this ugliness that caused Siskin to buy TAG. He was a friendly witness in court for TAG. Not because he was partisan but because he liked having two options when shipping scrap steel by rail to Republic Steel near Gadsden. Southern tried to be a bully with him and punish him over his testimony. So he bought TAG and gave them all his business. I would go into all that but it's more than a none TAG fan or Chattanooga region historian would care to hear. In the end Siskin was just old with nobody to leave his empire to, so he began to divest. Not to say that TAG didn't have obstacles to overcome to stay relevant. Things like expanding the Pigeon Mountain tunnel beyond class C. Southern was upfront with Siskin. They told him that they would be taking the TAG's bridge traffic. But TAG had begun a program to attract online industry and Southern promised Siskin they would continue. History had proven they were less than sincere and when Siskin died, they yanked up the majority of the railroad.    

Warren D. Stephens           

On Wednesday, July 1, 2020, 01:29:52 PM EDT, Robert Hanson via groups.io <rhanson669@...> wrote:


From what I've read and heard, the TAG's relationship with the Southern was not all beer and skittles, either.

The TAG made a living by short-hauling the Southern.  It paralleled the AGS for its (TAG's) entire length and if the Southern participated in the haul at all, it got, as I said, the short haul.

Hardly a situation to endear the TAG to the Southern.

As I understand it, the TAG considered the Southern to be only the lesser of the two evils, and by what margin it might be embarrassing to say.

I was working for the Southern in Internal Audit at the time the Southern purchased the TAG (effective 1-1-71) and we sent an audit team to go over the TAG's books and general affairs.  I was not part of that team.

There was some discussion of the past relationship between the two carriers.

Bob Hanson
Loganville, GA




-----Original Message-----
From: Warren Stephens <wdstephens@...>
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Jul 1, 2020 1:21 pm
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Mose Siskin part 2

Very true Bob but his loyalty remained with Southern. He had a big part in persuading Mr. Siskin to sell the profitable TAG to Southern. Some people with secondhand knowledge claim that the Siskins had a poor relationship with the L&N and would not even think of letting them have it. I have never been able to prove this so just hearsay. The TAG corporate documents were destroyed by Southern so you have to look at the TAG files of other railroads to get much. The CofG file on TAG was very helpful. If the L&N/NC&STL files on TAG still exist I have never been able to find them. 

WDS


On Jul 1, 2020, at 1:03 PM, Robert Hanson via groups.io <RHanson669@...> wrote:

Macon Tolleson was one of  Brosnan victims.

I don't recall if he quit or was fired, but he is one of the many capable men lost to the Southern due to Brosnan's whims.

The gory details are in the two-volume biography of DWB.

Bob Hanson
Loganville, GA


-----Original Message-----
From: Warren Stephens <wdstephens@...>
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Jul 1, 2020 12:41 pm
Subject: [SouthernRailway] Mose Siskin part 2

As for who ran the TAG, the TAG had a series of absentee owners. The investor Russell Sage, the railroad investor Newman Erb and the Coverdale syndicate. Only Siskin and earlier the Chambliss syndicate, were local. Of the last three presidents - or day to day managers- of TAG, two were former Southern executives. The last was former SOU ex. vp Macon Tollison.

Warren D. Stephens


Re: Mose Siskin part 2

Warren Stephens
 

Southern only began to pay the TAG any real attention after WW2. TAG traffic levels increased after the war and as the TAG's primary northern outlet from Chattanooga this miffed Southern. Because as you said the Southern could have handled anything TAG and L&N handled jointly. In the mid 50s, Southern did try and bully TAG out of business. Backfired on them in a dramatic fashion. It was this ugliness that caused Siskin to buy TAG. He was a friendly witness in court for TAG. Not because he was partisan but because he liked having two options when shipping scrap steel by rail to Republic Steel near Gadsden. Southern tried to be a bully with him and punish him over his testimony. So he bought TAG and gave them all his business. I would go into all that but it's more than a none TAG fan or Chattanooga region historian would care to hear. In the end Siskin was just old with nobody to leave his empire to, so he began to divest. Not to say that TAG didn't have obstacles to overcome to stay relevant. Things like expanding the Pigeon Mountain tunnel beyond class C. Southern was upfront with Siskin. They told him that they would be taking the TAG's bridge traffic. But TAG had begun a program to attract online industry and Southern promised Siskin they would continue. History had proven they were less than sincere and when Siskin died, they yanked up the majority of the railroad.    

Warren D. Stephens           

On Wednesday, July 1, 2020, 01:29:52 PM EDT, Robert Hanson via groups.io <rhanson669@...> wrote:


From what I've read and heard, the TAG's relationship with the Southern was not all beer and skittles, either.

The TAG made a living by short-hauling the Southern.  It paralleled the AGS for its (TAG's) entire length and if the Southern participated in the haul at all, it got, as I said, the short haul.

Hardly a situation to endear the TAG to the Southern.

As I understand it, the TAG considered the Southern to be only the lesser of the two evils, and by what margin it might be embarrassing to say.

I was working for the Southern in Internal Audit at the time the Southern purchased the TAG (effective 1-1-71) and we sent an audit team to go over the TAG's books and general affairs.  I was not part of that team.

There was some discussion of the past relationship between the two carriers.

Bob Hanson
Loganville, GA




-----Original Message-----
From: Warren Stephens <wdstephens@...>
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Jul 1, 2020 1:21 pm
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Mose Siskin part 2

Very true Bob but his loyalty remained with Southern. He had a big part in persuading Mr. Siskin to sell the profitable TAG to Southern. Some people with secondhand knowledge claim that the Siskins had a poor relationship with the L&N and would not even think of letting them have it. I have never been able to prove this so just hearsay. The TAG corporate documents were destroyed by Southern so you have to look at the TAG files of other railroads to get much. The CofG file on TAG was very helpful. If the L&N/NC&STL files on TAG still exist I have never been able to find them. 

WDS


On Jul 1, 2020, at 1:03 PM, Robert Hanson via groups.io <RHanson669@...> wrote:

Macon Tolleson was one of  Brosnan victims.

I don't recall if he quit or was fired, but he is one of the many capable men lost to the Southern due to Brosnan's whims.

The gory details are in the two-volume biography of DWB.

Bob Hanson
Loganville, GA


-----Original Message-----
From: Warren Stephens <wdstephens@...>
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Jul 1, 2020 12:41 pm
Subject: [SouthernRailway] Mose Siskin part 2

As for who ran the TAG, the TAG had a series of absentee owners. The investor Russell Sage, the railroad investor Newman Erb and the Coverdale syndicate. Only Siskin and earlier the Chambliss syndicate, were local. Of the last three presidents - or day to day managers- of TAG, two were former Southern executives. The last was former SOU ex. vp Macon Tollison.

Warren D. Stephens


Re: The Murphy Branch and Fontana Dam construction

Michael Roderick
 

Ike:

 

This is a very interesting letter to read and if you come up with more it would help answer some questions that I have.

 

Mike

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io> On Behalf Of George Eichelberger
Sent: Sunday, June 28, 2020 14:27
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Subject: [SouthernRailway] The Murphy Branch and Fontana Dam construction

 



The SR Presidents' files include correspondence on the Southern's Murphy branch spanning multiple years. The attached letter from TVA to the Southern, dated March 16, 1943 proposes that the railroad temporarily close the Murphy branch past the Fontana Dam construction area. The file also includes comments from local newspaper and shippers.

The Murphy Branch certainly warrants a full article in a future TIES. If any SRHA member is interested to go to the archives for research, we could begin that effort in the next month or so.

Ike

Re: Mose Siskin part 2

Warren Stephens
 

The flea market. 

WDS


On Jul 1, 2020, at 2:41 PM, Byron Osborn <bosborn10@...> wrote:

Warren, thanks for the information on the TAG.  Looking forward to seeing you book someday.  Other than watching the TAG and the AGS, not sure why you would visit Collinsville.  Hope to talk to you more about the TAG someday.  

Byron Osborn

Re: Mose Siskin part 2

Byron Osborn
 

Warren, thanks for the information on the TAG.  Looking forward to seeing you book someday.  Other than watching the TAG and the AGS, not sure why you would visit Collinsville.  Hope to talk to you more about the TAG someday.  

Byron Osborn

Re: Mose Siskin part 2

Robert Hanson
 

From what I've read and heard, the TAG's relationship with the Southern was not all beer and skittles, either.

The TAG made a living by short-hauling the Southern.  It paralleled the AGS for its (TAG's) entire length and if the Southern participated in the haul at all, it got, as I said, the short haul.

Hardly a situation to endear the TAG to the Southern.

As I understand it, the TAG considered the Southern to be only the lesser of the two evils, and by what margin it might be embarrassing to say.

I was working for the Southern in Internal Audit at the time the Southern purchased the TAG (effective 1-1-71) and we sent an audit team to go over the TAG's books and general affairs.  I was not part of that team.

There was some discussion of the past relationship between the two carriers.

Bob Hanson
Loganville, GA




-----Original Message-----
From: Warren Stephens <wdstephens@...>
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Jul 1, 2020 1:21 pm
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Mose Siskin part 2

Very true Bob but his loyalty remained with Southern. He had a big part in persuading Mr. Siskin to sell the profitable TAG to Southern. Some people with secondhand knowledge claim that the Siskins had a poor relationship with the L&N and would not even think of letting them have it. I have never been able to prove this so just hearsay. The TAG corporate documents were destroyed by Southern so you have to look at the TAG files of other railroads to get much. The CofG file on TAG was very helpful. If the L&N/NC&STL files on TAG still exist I have never been able to find them. 

WDS


On Jul 1, 2020, at 1:03 PM, Robert Hanson via groups.io <RHanson669@...> wrote:

Macon Tolleson was one of  Brosnan victims.

I don't recall if he quit or was fired, but he is one of the many capable men lost to the Southern due to Brosnan's whims.

The gory details are in the two-volume biography of DWB.

Bob Hanson
Loganville, GA


-----Original Message-----
From: Warren Stephens <wdstephens@...>
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Jul 1, 2020 12:41 pm
Subject: [SouthernRailway] Mose Siskin part 2

As for who ran the TAG, the TAG had a series of absentee owners. The investor Russell Sage, the railroad investor Newman Erb and the Coverdale syndicate. Only Siskin and earlier the Chambliss syndicate, were local. Of the last three presidents - or day to day managers- of TAG, two were former Southern executives. The last was former SOU ex. vp Macon Tollison.

Warren D. Stephens


Re: Mose Siskin part 2

Warren Stephens
 

Very true Bob but his loyalty remained with Southern. He had a big part in persuading Mr. Siskin to sell the profitable TAG to Southern. Some people with secondhand knowledge claim that the Siskins had a poor relationship with the L&N and would not even think of letting them have it. I have never been able to prove this so just hearsay. The TAG corporate documents were destroyed by Southern so you have to look at the TAG files of other railroads to get much. The CofG file on TAG was very helpful. If the L&N/NC&STL files on TAG still exist I have never been able to find them. 

WDS


On Jul 1, 2020, at 1:03 PM, Robert Hanson via groups.io <RHanson669@...> wrote:

Macon Tolleson was one of  Brosnan victims.

I don't recall if he quit or was fired, but he is one of the many capable men lost to the Southern due to Brosnan's whims.

The gory details are in the two-volume biography of DWB.

Bob Hanson
Loganville, GA


-----Original Message-----
From: Warren Stephens <wdstephens@...>
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Jul 1, 2020 12:41 pm
Subject: [SouthernRailway] Mose Siskin part 2

As for who ran the TAG, the TAG had a series of absentee owners. The investor Russell Sage, the railroad investor Newman Erb and the Coverdale syndicate. Only Siskin and earlier the Chambliss syndicate, were local. Of the last three presidents - or day to day managers- of TAG, two were former Southern executives. The last was former SOU ex. vp Macon Tollison.

Warren D. Stephens