Topics

locked Clay hoppers


D. Scott Chatfield
 

The Southern had a bunch of modified 3-bay open hoppers for clay service.  These are the ones with sorta-clamshell doors held closed by chains that were wrapped around spools on the carside.  I gather they mostly were used in the Carolinas.

My question is what customers did they serve?  Were they just for clay or did they also haul wet phosphate rock?  Have they been covered in TIES?

Thanks!  Hope to see some of you on Friday at the Archives.


Scott Chatfield


Warren Calloway
 

Most of the ones I saw in the old north state were used in service for the numerous brick companies hauling the clay use for brick manufacturing.

Warren

On Jan 13, 2020, at 3:16 PM, D. Scott Chatfield <blindog@...> wrote:

The Southern had a bunch of modified 3-bay open hoppers for clay service. These are the ones with sorta-clamshell doors held closed by chains that were wrapped around spools on the carside. I gather they mostly were used in the Carolinas.

My question is what customers did they serve? Were they just for clay or did they also haul wet phosphate rock? Have they been covered in TIES?

Thanks! Hope to see some of you on Friday at the Archives.


Scott Chatfield


George Eichelberger
 

Scott:

The “crude earth” cars were modified from 70T Sou 70000 series triple hoppers. When I was cataloging the SRHA freight car drawings they were generally in chrono and numerical order per drawing size. All of a sudden as I was going through drawings that went "backwards” by date and drawing number to the WWI era. It turned out, when the Southern did the mods on the clay hoppers they reached back into their files and used the same drop bottom design as the early composite hoppers. Everything used the old drawings!

The  cars were maintained (and very much disliked) at Greensboro. Most (all?) were in use to Gulf, NC

I “found” a large number of freight and passenger car retirement and scrapping records from the Claytor and Brosnan eras the last time I dug through the Prez files. Many of the composite hoppers are listed, enough we should do an article on them.

Ike

On Jan 13, 2020, at 3:16 PM, D. Scott Chatfield <blindog@...> wrote:

The Southern had a bunch of modified 3-bay open hoppers for clay service.  These are the ones with sorta-clamshell doors held closed by chains that were wrapped around spools on the carside.  I gather they mostly were used in the Carolinas.

My question is what customers did they serve?  Were they just for clay or did they also haul wet phosphate rock?  Have they been covered in TIES?

Thanks!  Hope to see some of you on Friday at the Archives.


Scott Chatfield


Kevin von der Lippe
 

Scott,

 

The clay hoppers were used between Gulf, NC (red clay pits) and Pomona Terra Cotta plant (pipe and tile company) in Greensboro, NC.  My understanding was 24 empties were transported a day to Gulf (ca. 1950s) and 24 full were picked up a day—so at least 48 of the cars were in captive service along the old Atlantic & Yadkin line (CF Line).

 

The NC Transportation Museum has a surviving example in Spencer, NC.  That one came from a Boren brick plant south of Greensboro—so I guess they could have been used anywhere to transport clay.  I understand some where used for Kaolin between Cordova, AL, and a Boren plant in Blacksburg, SC, until the mid-1980s

 

Fenton Wells did a clinic to a modelers group a year ago or so on how to kit-bash a hopper.  Mask Island Decals made decals for the HO-scale model that Fenton did.

 

I hope this helps.

 

Kevin von der Lippe

Oak Ridge, NC

 

 

From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io> On Behalf Of D. Scott Chatfield
Sent: Monday, January 13, 2020 3:17 PM
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
Subject: [SouthernRailway] Clay hoppers

 

The Southern had a bunch of modified 3-bay open hoppers for clay service.  These are the ones with sorta-clamshell doors held closed by chains that were wrapped around spools on the carside.  I gather they mostly were used in the Carolinas.

 

My question is what customers did they serve?  Were they just for clay or did they also haul wet phosphate rock?  Have they been covered in TIES?

 

Thanks!  Hope to see some of you on Friday at the Archives.

 

 

Scott Chatfield


George Eichelberger
 

Scott:

The clay hoppers were favorites of mine so I took as many photos of them as I could. I’m sure Warren has many more but here is a nice shot of Sou 72597 I took at Greensboro 12-30-83. Aside from the fact the sun was perfect, I wanted a photo with the doors down. I have to assume they were never moved without the doors being up?

Ike



On Jan 13, 2020, at 3:16 PM, D. Scott Chatfield <blindog@...> wrote:

The Southern had a bunch of modified 3-bay open hoppers for clay service.  These are the ones with sorta-clamshell doors held closed by chains that were wrapped around spools on the carside.  I gather they mostly were used in the Carolinas.

My question is what customers did they serve?  Were they just for clay or did they also haul wet phosphate rock?  Have they been covered in TIES?

Thanks!  Hope to see some of you on Friday at the Archives.


Scott Chatfield


George Eichelberger
 

Scott:

Digging through photos, I found several of the cars in wood chip service (stenciled along the channel below the side sill). The photos were all taken at Linwood yard.

Ike


On Jan 13, 2020, at 3:16 PM, D. Scott Chatfield <blindog@...> wrote:

The Southern had a bunch of modified 3-bay open hoppers for clay service.  These are the ones with sorta-clamshell doors held closed by chains that were wrapped around spools on the carside.  I gather they mostly were used in the Carolinas.

My question is what customers did they serve?  Were they just for clay or did they also haul wet phosphate rock?  Have they been covered in TIES?

Thanks!  Hope to see some of you on Friday at the Archives.


Scott Chatfield


Warren Calloway
 

Only scanned Shot I could find.

WC

On Jan 13, 2020, at 4:06 PM, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

Scott:

Digging through photos, I found several of the cars in wood chip service (stenciled along the channel below the side sill). The photos were all taken at Linwood yard.

Ike


On Jan 13, 2020, at 3:16 PM, D. Scott Chatfield <blindog@...> wrote:

The Southern had a bunch of modified 3-bay open hoppers for clay service. These are the ones with sorta-clamshell doors held closed by chains that were wrapped around spools on the carside. I gather they mostly were used in the Carolinas.

My question is what customers did they serve? Were they just for clay or did they also haul wet phosphate rock? Have they been covered in TIES?

Thanks! Hope to see some of you on Friday at the Archives.


Scott Chatfield


David Payne
 

In a message dated 1/13/2020 3:22:25 PM Eastern Standard Time, blindog@... writes:

The Southern had a bunch of modified 3-bay open hoppers for clay service.  These are the ones with sorta-clamshell doors held closed by chains that were wrapped around spools on the carside.  I gather they mostly were used in the Carolinas.

These cars were also "common" in Georgia in the mid-sixties and early-seventies between the clay pits northwest of Rome to brick manufacturers in the Columbus and Macon areas.

David Payne
Georgia






Sam Smith
 

These cars were used in wood chip service?


On Mon, Jan 13, 2020 at 6:32 PM, David Payne via Groups.Io
<davidcofga@...> wrote:
In a message dated 1/13/2020 3:22:25 PM Eastern Standard Time, blindog@... writes:

The Southern had a bunch of modified 3-bay open hoppers for clay service.  These are the ones with sorta-clamshell doors held closed by chains that were wrapped around spools on the carside.  I gather they mostly were used in the Carolinas.

These cars were also "common" in Georgia in the mid-sixties and early-seventies between the clay pits northwest of Rome to brick manufacturers in the Columbus and Macon areas.

David Payne
Georgia






George Eichelberger
 

Yes, note Sou 73648 attached at Linwood 7-96….with no side extensions or hopper bottoms, they certainly did not carry a heavy load of chips. I have photos at Pomona of several cars with the doors missing. Note the reinforcements along the top bulb angle. With solid bottoms , they could have been rotary dumped?

Ike

PS I have not checked but might the new Tangent hoppers be a starting point for a model of these?



On Jan 13, 2020, at 7:53 PM, Sam Smith via Groups.Io <sam_smith2004@...> wrote:

These cars were used in wood chip service?


On Mon, Jan 13, 2020 at 6:32 PM, David Payne via Groups.Io
In a message dated 1/13/2020 3:22:25 PM Eastern Standard Time, blindog@... writes:

The Southern had a bunch of modified 3-bay open hoppers for clay service.  These are the ones with sorta-clamshell doors held closed by chains that were wrapped around spools on the carside.  I gather they mostly were used in the Carolinas.

These cars were also "common" in Georgia in the mid-sixties and early-seventies between the clay pits northwest of Rome to brick manufacturers in the Columbus and Macon areas.

David Payne
Georgia







D. Scott Chatfield
 

Ike wondered:

> PS I have not checked but might the new Tangent hoppers be a starting point for a model of these?

Tangent's 3-bay hopper is a Pullman 15-panel PS-3, 2700cf if memory serves.  L&N owned a LOT.  Southern, I don't think so.

These clay hoppers were rebuilt from 9-panel 3-bays, a post-WW2 AAR standard design mostly associated with ACF.  I don't recall who built the Southern's.  (It's in the diagram book, I'm sure.)  Atlas makes a basic model of this car in their Trainman line.  The old MDC rib-side 3-bay is also this design.  Neither are going to be confused for a Tangent.

Ike might have been thinking of the recent Arrowhead Models coal hopper, which is a 12-panel 3-bay.  The original NS got some of these, and of course these went to the Southern.  I wonder why NS bought those?


Scott Chatfield


George Eichelberger
 

Scott:

I have not checked to see if they are correct for clay hopper conversions but they ARE absolutely correct for Southern. I questioned their freight car brown color with Roman lettering. The attached photo, and others I shot confirm they are SR prototypes, in FCB with proper lettering. Note the following photo from David Lehlbach. Actually, I should not have questioned it, Tangent does superior research and development.

May I suggest that everyone that models the Southern in HO should go to the Tangent web site and order several! We will only see this quality model if we support the companies that produce and sell them.

Ike

PS While people are ordering Southern cars, they might also consider getting a few “Dixie Line” L&N versions….they are beautiful!



On Jan 14, 2020, at 4:06 PM, D. Scott Chatfield <blindog@...> wrote:

Ike wondered:

> PS I have not checked but might the new Tangent hoppers be a starting point for a model of these?

Tangent's 3-bay hopper is a Pullman 15-panel PS-3, 2700cf if memory serves.  L&N owned a LOT.  Southern, I don't think so.

These clay hoppers were rebuilt from 9-panel 3-bays, a post-WW2 AAR standard design mostly associated with ACF.  I don't recall who built the Southern's.  (It's in the diagram book, I'm sure.)  Atlas makes a basic model of this car in their Trainman line.  The old MDC rib-side 3-bay is also this design.  Neither are going to be confused for a Tangent.

Ike might have been thinking of the recent Arrowhead Models coal hopper, which is a 12-panel 3-bay.  The original NS got some of these, and of course these went to the Southern.  I wonder why NS bought those?


Scott Chatfield
<Sou 73648 clay hopper (wood chips) Linwood Yard 7-96_2.jpeg>