locked Derail sign


Paul Schmidt
 

I'm looking for a photo of a Southern derail or "D" sign/target.

Thank you.
--
Paul Schmidt
Sequim WA


Carl Ardrey
 

Paul:
No such animal.  The derail sign is a General Code of Operating Rules requirement, not SOU.
CEA

On March 4, 2020 at 5:29 AM pschmidt3013@... wrote:

I'm looking for a photo of a Southern derail or "D" sign/target.

Thank you.
--
Paul Schmidt
Sequim WA

 


Paul Schmidt
 

Understood. So how did the Southern indicate to TY&E that a derail was present?
--
Paul Schmidt
Sequim WA


Bill Schafer
 

What time era are you interested in? In the 1970s, we painted the derails white. Otherwise, no other indication was necessary. 

—Bill

On Mar 4, 2020, at 8:10 AM, pschmidt3013@... wrote:

Understood. So how did the Southern indicate to TY&E that a derail was present?
--
Paul Schmidt
Sequim WA


Carl Ardrey
 

Painted orange, standards for location, and I promise we all knew where they were.
CEA


On Mar 4, 2020, at 11:11 AM, pschmidt3013@... wrote:

Understood. So how did the Southern indicate to TY&E that a derail was present?
--
Paul Schmidt
Sequim WA


 

Used to be you had to know the territory. Logic says a derail protects against a movement coming out into the main line at spur tracks, at industries like tank farms where there are connections to cars ( usually under blue flag protection controlled by the plant) , shop areas, etc etc .

Just look for the large lump of orange iron, and make sure it’s off before entering the track.

Had an old school roadforeman always tell the new hires “ kid don’t call me at 2 am to let me know the derail works”. It was drilled into us to know where they were on our territory and not to run them over .

Todd Pearson


On Mar 4, 2020, at 10:13 AM, pschmidt3013@... wrote:

Understood. So how did the Southern indicate to TY&E that a derail was present?
--
Paul Schmidt
Sequim WA


David Payne
 


Well, except when “newly installed” and the crew of the Griffin-Yates turn blind shoves into the passing track ... oops ... apparently working well in either direction.
DP


On Mar 4, 2020, at 1:14 PM, Carl Ardrey <carlardrey2005@...> wrote:

Painted orange, standards for location, and I promise we all knew where they were.
CEA


On Mar 4, 2020, at 11:11 AM, pschmidt3013@... wrote:

Understood. So how did the Southern indicate to TY&E that a derail was present?
--
Paul Schmidt
Sequim WA


Paul Schmidt
 

That's the era, Bill! I've searched the web for a photo --anything -- of what that sign would look like. 
--
Paul Schmidt
Sequim WA


Paul Schmidt
 

Much thanks! So no "D" or "Derail" or "Attend Derail" pointing out the obvious. Explains why I can't find anything. ...
--
Paul Schmidt
Sequim WA


Stephen Warner
 

Don't forget the SR standard for derails on tracks descending to main tracks. In the early 70's we were instructed to make a report on those locations, and many of them were replaced with switchpoint derails, as well as all new track constrcution.  The direction of the points were away from the main tracks.  If I recall correctly, they had a standard switch target.  Prior to this, I had a call to go to Greenland where the ASG Glass plant had a descending lead with a Hayes derail.  A hopper car had run down the lead, hopped over the derail and kept going out onto the (dark) main line.  Never got a wheel off of the rail except momentarily when the wheel "in the air"  over the derail.  No main line trains were involved, but it may have been industry-caused or the local may have let one get away.  We replaced it with a sw. pt. derail.  In another instance, the Night Local got one over the Hayes flop-over derail at Frisco Yd, shoving in a set off.  It was a new brakeman, and he threw off the adjacent derail to the track that he lined up.  Clarence McGee, my ATS used to say that the one thing that worked on SR was the derail.  But at Greenland he was wrong.