locked Steel vs wood passenger cars Circa 1909


A&Y Dave in MD
 

That is interesting.  Thanks for sharing stuff on the early years.  I get the whole high hoods era attraction, but for some reason I'm just fascinated in the 1900-1940 era.   I'm reading a 1928 Car Builder's Cyclopedia (noting that R.M. Ettinger was a Southern VP and was listed as an author/consultant for that CBC) and the range of technology and materials used then are just interesting.

Dave

Tuesday, December 8, 2020, 4:40:20 PM, you wrote:


Note attached....By June of 1911, attitudes on all-steel cars had changed but the Pullman Co. could not supply enough steel cars. The Southern considered the "Birmingham Special" a first-class train, making an observation car a requirement.

Ike



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David Bott

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George Eichelberger
 

Note attached....By June of 1911, attitudes on all-steel cars had changed but the Pullman Co. could not supply enough steel cars. The Southern considered the "Birmingham Special" a first-class train, making an observation car a requirement.

Ike


George Eichelberger
 

There are a number of memos and letters in the SRHA archives that discuss the move from wood to all-steel passenger equipment. Running multiple sections was already becoming a problem simply because of increasing passenger traffic.

Ike