locked Greensboro map was Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars


A&Y Dave in MD
 

A decade older, but here is a map I drew based upon a 1943 map.

Dave

Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

On Mar 7, 2021, at 7:30 PM, Rodney Shu <rodshu@...> wrote:


I always enjoy the communication on "Southern Memories".   Been here for several years.

My first request for information is for a "map - overview" of the Greensboro, N.C. area  in the mid  1950's.  My family lived there from 1952 until 1962.
Thanks 

Rod S.


From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io> on behalf of Robert W. Grabarek, Jr. <grabarek@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 7, 2021 2:37 PM
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars
 
Dear Mr. Henderson,

Thank you very much for this valuable information and the "inside story" of your own experiences while traveling with Amtrak.

I hadn't thought that the crews might have actually slept in bedrolls on the floor, but that's certainly a possibility on the Southern.  The heavyweight diners had bedding lockers in one end of the cars, but there was no indication of the storage of boards that might have been put on top of the tables to support that bedding.

Have you ever written about your experiences as a waiter for a railroad history group?

Bob Grabarek


-----Original Message-----
>From: "bjarne@..." <bjarne@...>
>Sent: Mar 6, 2021 12:17 AM
>To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
>Cc: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
>Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars
>
>When I worked as a dining car waiter for Amtrak in the 1970s, some of the more senior guys would talk about how they laid out their bedrolls on the floor of the diner.  The tables had latches that folded up and the chairs could be moved to the sides.  Linens were kept in lockers at the end of the dining car or in trap door lockers in the floor.  It was not very comfortable -- but given that almost everything was made from scratch -- they probably did not have lights out until after 11 pm and then had to be back on duty to prep the car for breakfast starting at 4:30 or 5 am for a 6 o'clock breakfast start.  It was a hard life; dorms were definitely a step up -- though some dorms were better than others.  I preferred the SP and UP ones.  The lounge dorms were the worst as you had the noise of the drunks.  The combines -- depending on where you had your bunk -- had the noise of baggage being handled at night -- or, in the case of the El Cap combines, had a nasty habit of losing their air conditioning.  Stewards and lounge car attendants with cash and keys had rooms -- bedrooms for stewards and roomettes or slumbercoach rooms for lounge car attendants.   /s/ Bjarne Henderson, Valparaiso, IN






A&Y Dave in MD
 

Forgot the map.

Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

On Mar 7, 2021, at 8:19 PM, David Bott <dbott@...> wrote:

A decade older, but here is a map I drew based upon a 1943 map.

Dave

Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

On Mar 7, 2021, at 7:30 PM, Rodney Shu <rodshu@...> wrote:


I always enjoy the communication on "Southern Memories".   Been here for several years.

My first request for information is for a "map - overview" of the Greensboro, N.C. area  in the mid  1950's.  My family lived there from 1952 until 1962.
Thanks 

Rod S.


From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io> on behalf of Robert W. Grabarek, Jr. <grabarek@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 7, 2021 2:37 PM
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars
 
Dear Mr. Henderson,

Thank you very much for this valuable information and the "inside story" of your own experiences while traveling with Amtrak.

I hadn't thought that the crews might have actually slept in bedrolls on the floor, but that's certainly a possibility on the Southern.  The heavyweight diners had bedding lockers in one end of the cars, but there was no indication of the storage of boards that might have been put on top of the tables to support that bedding.

Have you ever written about your experiences as a waiter for a railroad history group?

Bob Grabarek


-----Original Message-----
>From: "bjarne@..." <bjarne@...>
>Sent: Mar 6, 2021 12:17 AM
>To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
>Cc: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
>Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars
>
>When I worked as a dining car waiter for Amtrak in the 1970s, some of the more senior guys would talk about how they laid out their bedrolls on the floor of the diner.  The tables had latches that folded up and the chairs could be moved to the sides.  Linens were kept in lockers at the end of the dining car or in trap door lockers in the floor.  It was not very comfortable -- but given that almost everything was made from scratch -- they probably did not have lights out until after 11 pm and then had to be back on duty to prep the car for breakfast starting at 4:30 or 5 am for a 6 o'clock breakfast start.  It was a hard life; dorms were definitely a step up -- though some dorms were better than others.  I preferred the SP and UP ones.  The lounge dorms were the worst as you had the noise of the drunks.  The combines -- depending on where you had your bunk -- had the noise of baggage being handled at night -- or, in the case of the El Cap combines, had a nasty habit of losing their air conditioning.  Stewards and lounge car attendants with cash and keys had rooms -- bedrooms for stewards and roomettes or slumbercoach rooms for lounge car attendants.   /s/ Bjarne Henderson, Valparaiso, IN






Graves, William W
 

Just to add a little trivia to this topic…

 

Dave’s map is quite good.  I spent part of my childhood there from 54 to the late 60’s.  (Across from the Vick’s plant for awhile and near the A&Y northern line later.)  There was an industrial spur track at the Vick’s plant and at least two on the A&Y just north of the water plant.  There were also two decent trestles near the Duke Power plant, one on the plant spur and one on the “beltline”.  I do remember seeing trains serving the Vick’s plant and the power plant and a derrick stored on the spur (pass track?) just north of the water plant.

 

Other tracks I remember served what’s listed as the “Military Reservation” and came off the Raleigh line.  They ran north from the cigarette factories to about E. Bessemer and then had several tracks turn west for a few blocks that served a few warehouses.  Also (and this may have been later), there was a spur built downtown to serve the Greensboro Daily News printing facility.  It was very tightly fitted between several buildings.

 

Haven’t been back in about 15 years, so I am unsure what still exists other than the “mains”.

 

Damn, I’m old!

- Bill


Kevin von der Lippe
 

Bill,

 

Thank you for sharing.  With the closing of the Chandler Concrete plant (near Battleground and Mill Street), the evidence of the west bound A&Y is disappearing.

 

I am very interested that there was a derrick stored on the A&Y north of the water treatment plant.

 

The military reservation here was known as the ORD – Overseas Replacement Depot.  Some of the WWII buildings still exist, as well as remnants of the trackwork.  The Greensboro History Museum published an interesting photograph book via Arcadia of the ORD.

 

It would be great if you could share any photographs that you may have of Greensboro and trains – the Greensboro Chapter of the NRHS is always looking.

 

Kevin von der Lippe

Oak Ridge, NC


George Eichelberger
 

Greensboro, NC is well represented in the SRHA Archives digital files with 121 items. In the “Contracts” file, No. 821 covers the A&Y in 1924. Certainly some great material for a well researched TIES article! If someone will plan to get to an archive work session this Summer or Fall, they can look through everything and help locate other items to scan.

Here are two examples.

Ike




On Mar 8, 2021, at 9:50 AM, Kevin von der Lippe <kevin.vonderlippe@...> wrote:

Bill,

 

Thank you for sharing.  With the closing of the Chandler Concrete plant (near Battleground and Mill Street), the evidence of the west bound A&Y is disappearing.

 

I am very interested that there was a derrick stored on the A&Y north of the water treatment plant.

 

The military reservation here was known as the ORD – Overseas Replacement Depot.  Some of the WWII buildings still exist, as well as remnants of the trackwork.  The Greensboro History Museum published an interesting photograph book via Arcadia of the ORD.

 

It would be great if you could share any photographs that you may have of Greensboro and trains – the Greensboro Chapter of the NRHS is always looking.

 

Kevin von der Lippe
Oak Ridge, NC


Graves, William W
 

Rodney, Kevin and All –

 

> With the closing of the Chandler Concrete plant (near Battleground and Mill Street), the evidence of the west bound A&Y is disappearing.

I had wondered if that was still in operation.  I always thought Greensboro lost a great transit opportunity when they shortened that line.

 

> I am very interested that there was a derrick stored on the A&Y north of the water treatment plant.

Well, I was hanging out there in the 1956-58 time frame (When I was 10-12) and we would play on it.  (Not sure I ever saw a train on that line, although I know there were.)  Memory says the derrick was very small and not powered.  Other than that it would have been about 2/3’s the way to the Chandler siding, I’m afraid I don’t have much else on it.

 

> The military reservation here was known as the ORD – Overseas Replacement Depot. 

Thank you Kevin, I could not remember the name for the area!

 

> It would be great if you could share any photographs that you may have of Greensboro and trains

Sorry, I was too young to know I needed to be taking pictures and while my father was a semi-rail fan, it did not extend to picture taking.

 

And yes Rodney, it was Latham Park with the Little League fields.  When I lived across from there, they still had a park train too.  The creosote plant must have been gone by the time I was there.

Thanks for all the memories!

- Bill


Rodney Shu
 

One last thing.  When I was a year and a half old, my dad was a Trainmaster there. We lived in the Hill St. apartments and I snuck off twice and they found me in the creek that ran through the park.   Wonder I didn't drown.   😊




From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io> on behalf of Graves, William W <wwg@...>
Sent: Monday, March 8, 2021 10:06 AM
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io>
Subject: Re: Greensboro map was Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars
 

Rodney, Kevin and All –

 

> With the closing of the Chandler Concrete plant (near Battleground and Mill Street), the evidence of the west bound A&Y is disappearing.

I had wondered if that was still in operation.  I always thought Greensboro lost a great transit opportunity when they shortened that line.

 

> I am very interested that there was a derrick stored on the A&Y north of the water treatment plant.

Well, I was hanging out there in the 1956-58 time frame (When I was 10-12) and we would play on it.  (Not sure I ever saw a train on that line, although I know there were.)  Memory says the derrick was very small and not powered.  Other than that it would have been about 2/3’s the way to the Chandler siding, I’m afraid I don’t have much else on it.

 

> The military reservation here was known as the ORD – Overseas Replacement Depot. 

Thank you Kevin, I could not remember the name for the area!

 

> It would be great if you could share any photographs that you may have of Greensboro and trains

Sorry, I was too young to know I needed to be taking pictures and while my father was a semi-rail fan, it did not extend to picture taking.

 

And yes Rodney, it was Latham Park with the Little League fields.  When I lived across from there, they still had a park train too.  The creosote plant must have been gone by the time I was there.

Thanks for all the memories!

- Bill


aramsay18
 

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Andrew R <aramsay37@...>
Date: Tue, Mar 9, 2021 at 8:33 AM
Subject: Re: Greensboro map was Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars
To: <main@southernrailway.groups.io>


Was this installation located on the military reservation shown on your Greensboro map?


Thanks
Andy Ramsay
Berryville VA


On Sun, Mar 7, 2021 at 8:26 PM Andrew R <aramsay37@...> wrote:
Dave, what was the military reservation on your map?

Thanks

Andy Ramsay 
Berryville VA

On Sun, Mar 7, 2021, 8:20 PM A&Y Dave in MD <dbott@...> wrote:
Forgot the map.

Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

On Mar 7, 2021, at 8:19 PM, David Bott <dbott@...> wrote:

A decade older, but here is a map I drew based upon a 1943 map.

Dave

Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

On Mar 7, 2021, at 7:30 PM, Rodney Shu <rodshu@...> wrote:


I always enjoy the communication on "Southern Memories".   Been here for several years.

My first request for information is for a "map - overview" of the Greensboro, N.C. area  in the mid  1950's.  My family lived there from 1952 until 1962.
Thanks 

Rod S.


From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io> on behalf of Robert W. Grabarek, Jr. <grabarek@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 7, 2021 2:37 PM
To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars
 
Dear Mr. Henderson,

Thank you very much for this valuable information and the "inside story" of your own experiences while traveling with Amtrak.

I hadn't thought that the crews might have actually slept in bedrolls on the floor, but that's certainly a possibility on the Southern.  The heavyweight diners had bedding lockers in one end of the cars, but there was no indication of the storage of boards that might have been put on top of the tables to support that bedding.

Have you ever written about your experiences as a waiter for a railroad history group?

Bob Grabarek


-----Original Message-----
>From: "bjarne@..." <bjarne@...>
>Sent: Mar 6, 2021 12:17 AM
>To: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
>Cc: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io
>Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars
>
>When I worked as a dining car waiter for Amtrak in the 1970s, some of the more senior guys would talk about how they laid out their bedrolls on the floor of the diner.  The tables had latches that folded up and the chairs could be moved to the sides.  Linens were kept in lockers at the end of the dining car or in trap door lockers in the floor.  It was not very comfortable -- but given that almost everything was made from scratch -- they probably did not have lights out until after 11 pm and then had to be back on duty to prep the car for breakfast starting at 4:30 or 5 am for a 6 o'clock breakfast start.  It was a hard life; dorms were definitely a step up -- though some dorms were better than others.  I preferred the SP and UP ones.  The lounge dorms were the worst as you had the noise of the drunks.  The combines -- depending on where you had your bunk -- had the noise of baggage being handled at night -- or, in the case of the El Cap combines, had a nasty habit of losing their air conditioning.  Stewards and lounge car attendants with cash and keys had rooms -- bedrooms for stewards and roomettes or slumbercoach rooms for lounge car attendants.   /s/ Bjarne Henderson, Valparaiso, IN






Graves, William W
 

> Was this installation located on the military reservation shown on your Greensboro map?

 

While I did not recognize the picture, the Military Reservation shown on the map was definitely what was called the ORD section of Greensboro.  The picture could have been from the Pilot Life Campus that was mentioned in the wiki article as it had trees and while my time in Greensboro didn’t start until 1954, by then the ORD section was quite built up with small industrial buildings.

- Bill


Steve Ellis
 

I was wondering if the Southern Railway ever housed any of their employees in a hotel for an overnight stay. I know that Amtrak does this. Here in New York City, one of the car attendants on the Crescent told me that he spends the night in a hotel right across the street from Penn Station.


Employees on American trains are not away from home nearly as much as those on the Russian trains. In 2010 I fulfilled a dream I’ve had from childhood and rode the Trans-Siberian railroad from Moscow to Vladivostok, a journey of seven days.


On YouTube you can watch a video of a lady who is an attendant on this train. Every time she leaves home it is for two weeks. The train does not have showers, and they do not get a hotel when they get to Vladivostok, sleeping in the train instead.


I spoke to one lady who said that she did two round trips and was away from home for a month.


Steve Ellis,
Brooklyn New York




On Mar 9, 2021, at 10:42 AM, Graves, William W <wwg@...> wrote:



> Was this installation located on the military reservation shown on your Greensboro map?

 

While I did not recognize the picture, the Military Reservation shown on the map was definitely what was called the ORD section of Greensboro.  The picture could have been from the Pilot Life Campus that was mentioned in the wiki article as it had trees and while my time in Greensboro didn’t start until 1954, by then the ORD section was quite built up with small industrial buildings.

- Bill


George Eichelberger
 

In addition to hotels, many cities and large railroad facilities had either bunkhouses or YMCAs. (There are plans for several in the archives.) The question is….were they used by dining car staff? I suspect that was not common because dining cars were dropped and picked up by trains at various depots.

Ike

PS Here are two pages from the 7-31-57 dining car assignments.



On Mar 9, 2021, at 10:58 AM, Steve Ellis via groups.io <meadowbrookdairy@...> wrote:

I was wondering if the Southern Railway ever housed any of their employees in a hotel for an overnight stay. I know that Amtrak does this. Here in New York City, one of the car attendants on the Crescent told me that he spends the night in a hotel right across the street from Penn Station.


Employees on American trains are not away from home nearly as much as those on the Russian trains. In 2010 I fulfilled a dream I’ve had from childhood and rode the Trans-Siberian railroad from Moscow to Vladivostok, a journey of seven days.


On YouTube you can watch a video of a lady who is an attendant on this train. Every time she leaves home it is for two weeks. The train does not have showers, and they do not get a hotel when they get to Vladivostok, sleeping in the train instead.


I spoke to one lady who said that she did two round trips and was away from home for a month.


Steve Ellis,
Brooklyn New York




On Mar 9, 2021, at 10:42 AM, Graves, William W <wwg@...> wrote:


> Was this installation located on the military reservation shown on your Greensboro map?
 
While I did not recognize the picture, the Military Reservation shown on the map was definitely what was called the ORD section of Greensboro.  The picture could have been from the Pilot Life Campus that was mentioned in the wiki article as it had trees and while my time in Greensboro didn’t start until 1954, by then the ORD section was quite built up with small industrial buildings.
- Bill


Steve Ellis
 

Wonderful, thank you! 

 On my trip on the Southern from Washington to Atlanta and back in October of 1970, it seemed that even car attendants wore a white cotton 
jacket that looks like something a waiter would wear. Is that normal attire or was this person perhaps a member of the dining staff filling in for
the regular car attendant? 


On Tuesday, March 9, 2021, 11:42:52 AM EST, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:


In addition to hotels, many cities and large railroad facilities had either bunkhouses or YMCAs. (There are plans for several in the archives.) The question is….were they used by dining car staff? I suspect that was not common because dining cars were dropped and picked up by trains at various depots.

Ike

PS Here are two pages from the 7-31-57 dining car assignments.



On Mar 9, 2021, at 10:58 AM, Steve Ellis via groups.io <meadowbrookdairy@...> wrote:

I was wondering if the Southern Railway ever housed any of their employees in a hotel for an overnight stay. I know that Amtrak does this. Here in New York City, one of the car attendants on the Crescent told me that he spends the night in a hotel right across the street from Penn Station.


Employees on American trains are not away from home nearly as much as those on the Russian trains. In 2010 I fulfilled a dream I’ve had from childhood and rode the Trans-Siberian railroad from Moscow to Vladivostok, a journey of seven days.


On YouTube you can watch a video of a lady who is an attendant on this train. Every time she leaves home it is for two weeks. The train does not have showers, and they do not get a hotel when they get to Vladivostok, sleeping in the train instead.


I spoke to one lady who said that she did two round trips and was away from home for a month.


Steve Ellis,
Brooklyn New York




On Mar 9, 2021, at 10:42 AM, Graves, William W <wwg@...> wrote:


> Was this installation located on the military reservation shown on your Greensboro map?
 
While I did not recognize the picture, the Military Reservation shown on the map was definitely what was called the ORD section of Greensboro.  The picture could have been from the Pilot Life Campus that was mentioned in the wiki article as it had trees and while my time in Greensboro didn’t start until 1954, by then the ORD section was quite built up with small industrial buildings.
- Bill


Robert W. Grabarek, Jr.
 

The white jacket was normal attire for coach attendants.

Bob Grabarek

-----Original Message-----
From: "Steve Ellis via groups.io"
Sent: Mar 9, 2021 12:17 PM
To: "main@SouthernRailway.groups.io"
Subject: Re: Greensboro map was Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars

Wonderful, thank you! 

 On my trip on the Southern from Washington to Atlanta and back in October of 1970, it seemed that even car attendants wore a white cotton 
jacket that looks like something a waiter would wear. Is that normal attire or was this person perhaps a member of the dining staff filling in for
the regular car attendant? 


On Tuesday, March 9, 2021, 11:42:52 AM EST, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:


In addition to hotels, many cities and large railroad facilities had either bunkhouses or YMCAs. (There are plans for several in the archives.) The question is….were they used by dining car staff? I suspect that was not common because dining cars were dropped and picked up by trains at various depots.

Ike

PS Here are two pages from the 7-31-57 dining car assignments.



On Mar 9, 2021, at 10:58 AM, Steve Ellis via groups.io <meadowbrookdairy@...> wrote:

I was wondering if the Southern Railway ever housed any of their employees in a hotel for an overnight stay. I know that Amtrak does this. Here in New York City, one of the car attendants on the Crescent told me that he spends the night in a hotel right across the street from Penn Station.


Employees on American trains are not away from home nearly as much as those on the Russian trains. In 2010 I fulfilled a dream I’ve had from childhood and rode the Trans-Siberian railroad from Moscow to Vladivostok, a journey of seven days.


On YouTube you can watch a video of a lady who is an attendant on this train. Every time she leaves home it is for two weeks. The train does not have showers, and they do not get a hotel when they get to Vladivostok, sleeping in the train instead.


I spoke to one lady who said that she did two round trips and was away from home for a month.


Steve Ellis,
Brooklyn New York




On Mar 9, 2021, at 10:42 AM, Graves, William W <wwg@...> wrote:


> Was this installation located on the military reservation shown on your Greensboro map?
 
While I did not recognize the picture, the Military Reservation shown on the map was definitely what was called the ORD section of Greensboro.  The picture could have been from the Pilot Life Campus that was mentioned in the wiki article as it had trees and while my time in Greensboro didn’t start until 1954, by then the ORD section was quite built up with small industrial buildings.
- Bill


George Eichelberger
 

When office car NS-8 arrived at TVRM, I was looking in the closets and discovered several what I’d call “attendants’ jackets, soiled but in good condition. Someday, I expect they will find a new use in a museum display?

Ike

PS We are still looking for new trucks for Southern OC-21 circa 1956 (when it was converted at Hayne Shop). If anyone know of any that might be available, let me know at archives@....



On Mar 9, 2021, at 2:19 PM, Robert W. Grabarek, Jr. <grabarek@...> wrote:

The white jacket was normal attire for coach attendants.

Bob Grabarek

-----Original Message----- 
From: "Steve Ellis via groups.io" 
Sent: Mar 9, 2021 12:17 PM 
To: "main@SouthernRailway.groups.io" 
Subject: Re: Greensboro map was Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars 

Wonderful, thank you! 

 On my trip on the Southern from Washington to Atlanta and back in October of 1970, it seemed that even car attendants wore a white cotton 
jacket that looks like something a waiter would wear. Is that normal attire or was this person perhaps a member of the dining staff filling in for
the regular car attendant? 


On Tuesday, March 9, 2021, 11:42:52 AM EST, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:


In addition to hotels, many cities and large railroad facilities had either bunkhouses or YMCAs. (There are plans for several in the archives.) The question is….were they used by dining car staff? I suspect that was not common because dining cars were dropped and picked up by trains at various depots.

Ike

PS Here are two pages from the 7-31-57 dining car assignments.



On Mar 9, 2021, at 10:58 AM, Steve Ellis via groups.io <meadowbrookdairy@...> wrote:

I was wondering if the Southern Railway ever housed any of their employees in a hotel for an overnight stay. I know that Amtrak does this. Here in New York City, one of the car attendants on the Crescent told me that he spends the night in a hotel right across the street from Penn Station.


Employees on American trains are not away from home nearly as much as those on the Russian trains. In 2010 I fulfilled a dream I’ve had from childhood and rode the Trans-Siberian railroad from Moscow to Vladivostok, a journey of seven days.


On YouTube you can watch a video of a lady who is an attendant on this train. Every time she leaves home it is for two weeks. The train does not have showers, and they do not get a hotel when they get to Vladivostok, sleeping in the train instead.


I spoke to one lady who said that she did two round trips and was away from home for a month.


Steve Ellis,
Brooklyn New York




On Mar 9, 2021, at 10:42 AM, Graves, William W <wwg@...> wrote:


> Was this installation located on the military reservation shown on your Greensboro map?
 
While I did not recognize the picture, the Military Reservation shown on the map was definitely what was called the ORD section of Greensboro.  The picture could have been from the Pilot Life Campus that was mentioned in the wiki article as it had trees and while my time in Greensboro didn’t start until 1954, by then the ORD section was quite built up with small industrial buildings.
- Bill



Steve Ellis
 

As I remember it, the attendants’ jackets did seem to look to be styled a little bit like a sports jacket or blazer, but without the lining or construction. They were also shorter, but I remember them having a button front and lapels.




On Mar 9, 2021, at 2:44 PM, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

When office car NS-8 arrived at TVRM, I was looking in the closets and discovered several what I’d call “attendants’ jackets, soiled but in good condition. Someday, I expect they will find a new use in a museum display?

Ike

PS We are still looking for new trucks for Southern OC-21 circa 1956 (when it was converted at Hayne Shop). If anyone know of any that might be available, let me know at archives@....



On Mar 9, 2021, at 2:19 PM, Robert W. Grabarek, Jr. <grabarek@...> wrote:

The white jacket was normal attire for coach attendants.

Bob Grabarek

-----Original Message----- 
From: "Steve Ellis via groups.io" 
Sent: Mar 9, 2021 12:17 PM 
To: "main@SouthernRailway.groups.io" 
Subject: Re: Greensboro map was Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars 

Wonderful, thank you! 

 On my trip on the Southern from Washington to Atlanta and back in October of 1970, it seemed that even car attendants wore a white cotton 
jacket that looks like something a waiter would wear. Is that normal attire or was this person perhaps a member of the dining staff filling in for
the regular car attendant? 


On Tuesday, March 9, 2021, 11:42:52 AM EST, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:


In addition to hotels, many cities and large railroad facilities had either bunkhouses or YMCAs. (There are plans for several in the archives.) The question is….were they used by dining car staff? I suspect that was not common because dining cars were dropped and picked up by trains at various depots.

Ike

PS Here are two pages from the 7-31-57 dining car assignments.



On Mar 9, 2021, at 10:58 AM, Steve Ellis via groups.io <meadowbrookdairy@...> wrote:

I was wondering if the Southern Railway ever housed any of their employees in a hotel for an overnight stay. I know that Amtrak does this. Here in New York City, one of the car attendants on the Crescent told me that he spends the night in a hotel right across the street from Penn Station.


Employees on American trains are not away from home nearly as much as those on the Russian trains. In 2010 I fulfilled a dream I’ve had from childhood and rode the Trans-Siberian railroad from Moscow to Vladivostok, a journey of seven days.


On YouTube you can watch a video of a lady who is an attendant on this train. Every time she leaves home it is for two weeks. The train does not have showers, and they do not get a hotel when they get to Vladivostok, sleeping in the train instead.


I spoke to one lady who said that she did two round trips and was away from home for a month.


Steve Ellis,
Brooklyn New York




On Mar 9, 2021, at 10:42 AM, Graves, William W <wwg@...> wrote:


> Was this installation located on the military reservation shown on your Greensboro map?
 
While I did not recognize the picture, the Military Reservation shown on the map was definitely what was called the ORD section of Greensboro.  The picture could have been from the Pilot Life Campus that was mentioned in the wiki article as it had trees and while my time in Greensboro didn’t start until 1954, by then the ORD section was quite built up with small industrial buildings.
- Bill



Steve Ellis
 

Or the cruise on the Crescent based out of New Orleans or Washington, or both?


On Mar 9, 2021, at 3:04 PM, Steve Ellis <meadowbrookdairy@...> wrote:

As I remember it, the attendants’ jackets did seem to look to be styled a little bit like a sports jacket or blazer, but without the lining or construction. They were also shorter, but I remember them having a button front and lapels.




On Mar 9, 2021, at 2:44 PM, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

When office car NS-8 arrived at TVRM, I was looking in the closets and discovered several what I’d call “attendants’ jackets, soiled but in good condition. Someday, I expect they will find a new use in a museum display?

Ike

PS We are still looking for new trucks for Southern OC-21 circa 1956 (when it was converted at Hayne Shop). If anyone know of any that might be available, let me know at archives@....



On Mar 9, 2021, at 2:19 PM, Robert W. Grabarek, Jr. <grabarek@...> wrote:

The white jacket was normal attire for coach attendants.

Bob Grabarek

-----Original Message----- 
From: "Steve Ellis via groups.io" 
Sent: Mar 9, 2021 12:17 PM 
To: "main@SouthernRailway.groups.io" 
Subject: Re: Greensboro map was Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars 

Wonderful, thank you! 

 On my trip on the Southern from Washington to Atlanta and back in October of 1970, it seemed that even car attendants wore a white cotton 
jacket that looks like something a waiter would wear. Is that normal attire or was this person perhaps a member of the dining staff filling in for
the regular car attendant? 


On Tuesday, March 9, 2021, 11:42:52 AM EST, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:


In addition to hotels, many cities and large railroad facilities had either bunkhouses or YMCAs. (There are plans for several in the archives.) The question is….were they used by dining car staff? I suspect that was not common because dining cars were dropped and picked up by trains at various depots.

Ike

PS Here are two pages from the 7-31-57 dining car assignments.



On Mar 9, 2021, at 10:58 AM, Steve Ellis via groups.io <meadowbrookdairy@...> wrote:

I was wondering if the Southern Railway ever housed any of their employees in a hotel for an overnight stay. I know that Amtrak does this. Here in New York City, one of the car attendants on the Crescent told me that he spends the night in a hotel right across the street from Penn Station.


Employees on American trains are not away from home nearly as much as those on the Russian trains. In 2010 I fulfilled a dream I’ve had from childhood and rode the Trans-Siberian railroad from Moscow to Vladivostok, a journey of seven days.


On YouTube you can watch a video of a lady who is an attendant on this train. Every time she leaves home it is for two weeks. The train does not have showers, and they do not get a hotel when they get to Vladivostok, sleeping in the train instead.


I spoke to one lady who said that she did two round trips and was away from home for a month.


Steve Ellis,
Brooklyn New York




On Mar 9, 2021, at 10:42 AM, Graves, William W <wwg@...> wrote:


> Was this installation located on the military reservation shown on your Greensboro map?
 
While I did not recognize the picture, the Military Reservation shown on the map was definitely what was called the ORD section of Greensboro.  The picture could have been from the Pilot Life Campus that was mentioned in the wiki article as it had trees and while my time in Greensboro didn’t start until 1954, by then the ORD section was quite built up with small industrial buildings.
- Bill



bjarne@juno.com
 

My experiences go back to when I was a service attendant for Amtrak during the summer seasons of 1977, 1979, and 1980. The service attendants usually went to a different hotel than the transportation employees like conductors and engineers. This was probably because the transportation people had their hotels paid by the host railroad. Further, as both groups were represented by different unions, that also could have had an effect on who stayed where. For every rule, there is an exception. I stayed in the same places as the rest of the crew at Dubuque, Quincy, Carbondale, and Champaign. Different locales in LA, New York, New Orleans, Detroit, and St. Louis. Hope this information is helpful, FWIW. Bjarne Henderson, Valparaiso, IN


Steve Ellis
 

Wow, you really got around the country.

On Mar 9, 2021, at 8:34 PM, bjarne@juno.com wrote:

My experiences go back to when I was a service attendant for Amtrak during the summer seasons of 1977, 1979, and 1980. The service attendants usually went to a different hotel than the transportation employees like conductors and engineers. This was probably because the transportation people had their hotels paid by the host railroad. Further, as both groups were represented by different unions, that also could have had an effect on who stayed where. For every rule, there is an exception. I stayed in the same places as the rest of the crew at Dubuque, Quincy, Carbondale, and Champaign. Different locales in LA, New York, New Orleans, Detroit, and St. Louis. Hope this information is helpful, FWIW. Bjarne Henderson, Valparaiso, IN





bjarne@juno.com
 

It was a great job -- extra board out of Chicago as a service attendant and then as a lead service attendant. The Chicago crew base held almost all assignments except some of #7 and #8 (some Seattle crews), the DC section of the Bway Ltd until it went HEP (then we got it) and the Floridian. #3 and #4 also had some LA based crews - mostly in the sleepers I think..


Steve Ellis
 

Were the crews on the Southern Crescent based out of New Orleans or Washington, or both?


On Mar 9, 2021, at 3:04 PM, Steve Ellis <meadowbrookdairy@...> wrote:


As I remember it, the attendants’ jackets did seem to look to be styled a little bit like a sports jacket or blazer, but without the lining or construction. They were also shorter, but I remember them having a button front and lapels.




On Mar 9, 2021, at 2:44 PM, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:


When office car NS-8 arrived at TVRM, I was looking in the closets and discovered several what I’d call “attendants’ jackets, soiled but in good condition. Someday, I expect they will find a new use in a museum display?

Ike

PS We are still looking for new trucks for Southern OC-21 circa 1956 (when it was converted at Hayne Shop). If anyone know of any that might be available, let me know at archives@....



On Mar 9, 2021, at 2:19 PM, Robert W. Grabarek, Jr. <grabarek@...> wrote:

The white jacket was normal attire for coach attendants.

Bob Grabarek

-----Original Message----- 
From: "Steve Ellis via groups.io" 
Sent: Mar 9, 2021 12:17 PM 
To: "main@SouthernRailway.groups.io" 
Subject: Re: Greensboro map was Re: [SouthernRailway] Dining Car Crews Sleeping on their Cars 

Wonderful, thank you! 

 On my trip on the Southern from Washington to Atlanta and back in October of 1970, it seemed that even car attendants wore a white cotton 
jacket that looks like something a waiter would wear. Is that normal attire or was this person perhaps a member of the dining staff filling in for
the regular car attendant? 


On Tuesday, March 9, 2021, 11:42:52 AM EST, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:


In addition to hotels, many cities and large railroad facilities had either bunkhouses or YMCAs. (There are plans for several in the archives.) The question is….were they used by dining car staff? I suspect that was not common because dining cars were dropped and picked up by trains at various depots.

Ike

PS Here are two pages from the 7-31-57 dining car assignments.



On Mar 9, 2021, at 10:58 AM, Steve Ellis via groups.io <meadowbrookdairy@...> wrote:

I was wondering if the Southern Railway ever housed any of their employees in a hotel for an overnight stay. I know that Amtrak does this. Here in New York City, one of the car attendants on the Crescent told me that he spends the night in a hotel right across the street from Penn Station.


Employees on American trains are not away from home nearly as much as those on the Russian trains. In 2010 I fulfilled a dream I’ve had from childhood and rode the Trans-Siberian railroad from Moscow to Vladivostok, a journey of seven days.


On YouTube you can watch a video of a lady who is an attendant on this train. Every time she leaves home it is for two weeks. The train does not have showers, and they do not get a hotel when they get to Vladivostok, sleeping in the train instead.


I spoke to one lady who said that she did two round trips and was away from home for a month.


Steve Ellis,
Brooklyn New York




On Mar 9, 2021, at 10:42 AM, Graves, William W <wwg@...> wrote:


> Was this installation located on the military reservation shown on your Greensboro map?
 
While I did not recognize the picture, the Military Reservation shown on the map was definitely what was called the ORD section of Greensboro.  The picture could have been from the Pilot Life Campus that was mentioned in the wiki article as it had trees and while my time in Greensboro didn’t start until 1954, by then the ORD section was quite built up with small industrial buildings.
- Bill