locked Ludlow, KY


George Eichelberger
 

All:

Cincinnati and Ludlow, KY have not had enough written about them over the years. Today, NS posted information about leasing one of the Ludlow Shop buildings to the Ludlow Museum. https://www.progressiverailroading.com/norfolk_southern/news/NS-Ludlow-museum-sign-lease-agreement-for-historic-yard-shop

I sent the following email to the Ludlow Museum this morning:

I am the Archives Director for the Southern Railway Historical association (SRHA). Our permanent archives is located at the Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum (TVRM) at Chattanooga, TN. Although there is probably much more material in our archives relating to Ludlow than we have scanned, many maps, drawings and photos of the Southern (CNO&TP) in Ludlow are in our digital files. The Ludlow Heritage Museum is welcome to whatever material we have that would be useful.

George Eichelberger - SRHA Archives Director
Smyrna, GA

----

If anyone is on our .io group is interested in the Ludlow/Cincy area, the archives can help with material if anyone would like to do an article for “TIES” or "The Southern News Bulletin” we will be starting soon. “SNB” will be an published on-line the two months between TIES issues. As SNB will essentially be an updated and expanded version of “Among Ourselves” that has been in TIES sent to SRHA members, SNB will only go to members. In addition to articles, photos and drawings, we plan to have it emphasize “Modeling the Southern” as we have never had room to do in TIES. Of course the .io groups will continue but now may be the time for folks interested in the Southern…that are not SRHA members to join?

Before the demise of Comair, several SRHA members flew for them. We collective called them the “Erlanger Air Force”. Among other projects, they were instrumental in restoring the Erlanger depot. They organized a very successful SRHA convention in Cincinnati years ago that we should repeat someday.

The archives also contain a large sequence of photos of the rebuilding of the Ohio River bridge, made by the American Bridge Co. That is certainly worth someone doing a TIES article, esp. when various drawings are included. There are extensive (!) files on “Cincinnati Union Station” that cover many years and attempts to build a “union station” there.

Ike


 

Ike,

You have succeeded in flushing me out of the woodwork. A few years ago, Mr. Thurston and I were talking a lot about doing a Ludlow bridge building article (largely focusing on the current lift bridge finished in 1922. I have that article about half written. I have also done plenty of research to do a Ludlow yards and shops article (but the place was so extensive), that it is a large subject by itself. There were three shifts, going around the clock, at Ludlow at one point. There were well over 1,000 workers at that time from locomotive servicing, major car repair and building, car cleaners, etc. etc. 

I grew up in Ludlow, Kentucky. I now live a few miles away in Cincinnati. I have talked to Mark Mitchell about their project some. In the past few years, my attention to SRHA dwindled (but not my membership) as I took on the presidency of the Cincinnati Railroad Club. I am pleased to announce that we have moved back to Cincinnati Union Terminal this January after being gone for more than 5 years. This has been my focus the past couple of years, and utilizing spaces in CUT for the betterment of the club and preservation will continue to be my focus. An SRHA convention around the area someday? You bet, but I can start by reviving some of my article ideas for SRHA. I also have an article in progress of the early days of how McLean Yard in Cincinnati grew from just a little over 2 tracks in 1880 to a fairly major operation in the 1920s. Of course, CUT was built atop McLean, and then Gest Street came into being. Ludlow was always where the locomotives were serviced. The Cincinnati Southern’s Cincinnati yards were always undersized compared to the traffic needs and demands. There is also the CNO&TP’s 1905-built elevated high line and street trackage to the massive LCL warehouse on the riverfront to consider. That is worth an article all by itself as well.

Feel free to drop me a line to talk more
chris.mayhew61@...

Also, my profession is (and has been for 25 years) that of a full-time paid on staff writer. 


George Eichelberger
 

Chris:

Jim and I talked many times about your conversations with him about Cincy and the CNO&TP. The offer to let you have whatever material is in the archives to  help is always open. (I remember we sent you the “AFE” list of CNOTP projects some time ago….great stuff!). I don’t think Jim or I have told you I located (and scanned) many files about Cincy passenger depots from about 1910 to the expansion of the Southern intermodal facility. There are also extensive files on the banana and freight houses and the trackage along the river….including quite a few drawings!

I’ve “CC’d Bill Schafer, our TIES editor here and suggest you continue the work on your articles (maybe others are interested in helping?) I’ll help with material fro the archives however I can….

Ike

PS I’ve attached one of the marvelous (reduced resolution) photos of the bridge reconstruction. The new bridge was built over and around the original without taking it out of service!





On Jan 10, 2022, at 2:12 PM, CMayhew <chris.mayhew611@...> wrote:

Ike,

You have succeeded in flushing me out of the woodwork. A few years ago, Mr. Thurston and I were talking a lot about doing a Ludlow bridge building article (largely focusing on the current lift bridge finished in 1922. I have that article about half written. I have also done plenty of research to do a Ludlow yards and shops article (but the place was so extensive), that it is a large subject by itself. There were three shifts, going around the clock, at Ludlow at one point. There were well over 1,000 workers at that time from locomotive servicing, major car repair and building, car cleaners, etc. etc. 

I grew up in Ludlow, Kentucky. I now live a few miles away in Cincinnati. I have talked to Mark Mitchell about their project some. In the past few years, my attention to SRHA dwindled (but not my membership) as I took on the presidency of the Cincinnati Railroad Club. I am pleased to announce that we have moved back to Cincinnati Union Terminal this January after being gone for more than 5 years. This has been my focus the past couple of years, and utilizing spaces in CUT for the betterment of the club and preservation will continue to be my focus. An SRHA convention around the area someday? You bet, but I can start by reviving some of my article ideas for SRHA. I also have an article in progress of the early days of how McLean Yard in Cincinnati grew from just a little over 2 tracks in 1880 to a fairly major operation in the 1920s. Of course, CUT was built atop McLean, and then Gest Street came into being. Ludlow was always where the locomotives were serviced. The Cincinnati Southern’s Cincinnati yards were always undersized compared to the traffic needs and demands. There is also the CNO&TP’s 1905-built elevated high line and street trackage to the massive LCL warehouse on the riverfront to consider. That is worth an article all by itself as well.

Feel free to drop me a line to talk more
chris.mayhew61@...

Also, my profession is (and has been for 25 years) that of a full-time paid on staff writer. 


Bill Schafer
 

Chris:

I continue to be very interested in running whatever article you might send me on any aspects of SOU-related operations/facilities in the Cincinnati area. As Ike says, the material in the SRHA Archives is at your disposal. 

Best wishes,

—Bill

On Jan 10, 2022, at 14:36, George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:

Chris:

Jim and I talked many times about your conversations with him about Cincy and the CNO&TP. The offer to let you have whatever material is in the archives to  help is always open. (I remember we sent you the “AFE” list of CNOTP projects some time ago….great stuff!). I don’t think Jim or I have told you I located (and scanned) many files about Cincy passenger depots from about 1910 to the expansion of the Southern intermodal facility. There are also extensive files on the banana and freight houses and the trackage along the river….including quite a few drawings!

I’ve “CC’d Bill Schafer, our TIES editor here and suggest you continue the work on your articles (maybe others are interested in helping?) I’ll help with material fro the archives however I can….

Ike

PS I’ve attached one of the marvelous (reduced resolution) photos of the bridge reconstruction. The new bridge was built over and around the original without taking it out of service!

<CSB 47 9-14-1921 hoisting derrick car.jpg>




On Jan 10, 2022, at 2:12 PM, CMayhew <chris.mayhew611@...> wrote:

Ike,

You have succeeded in flushing me out of the woodwork. A few years ago, Mr. Thurston and I were talking a lot about doing a Ludlow bridge building article (largely focusing on the current lift bridge finished in 1922. I have that article about half written. I have also done plenty of research to do a Ludlow yards and shops article (but the place was so extensive), that it is a large subject by itself. There were three shifts, going around the clock, at Ludlow at one point. There were well over 1,000 workers at that time from locomotive servicing, major car repair and building, car cleaners, etc. etc. 

I grew up in Ludlow, Kentucky. I now live a few miles away in Cincinnati. I have talked to Mark Mitchell about their project some. In the past few years, my attention to SRHA dwindled (but not my membership) as I took on the presidency of the Cincinnati Railroad Club. I am pleased to announce that we have moved back to Cincinnati Union Terminal this January after being gone for more than 5 years. This has been my focus the past couple of years, and utilizing spaces in CUT for the betterment of the club and preservation will continue to be my focus. An SRHA convention around the area someday? You bet, but I can start by reviving some of my article ideas for SRHA. I also have an article in progress of the early days of how McLean Yard in Cincinnati grew from just a little over 2 tracks in 1880 to a fairly major operation in the 1920s. Of course, CUT was built atop McLean, and then Gest Street came into being. Ludlow was always where the locomotives were serviced. The Cincinnati Southern’s Cincinnati yards were always undersized compared to the traffic needs and demands. There is also the CNO&TP’s 1905-built elevated high line and street trackage to the massive LCL warehouse on the riverfront to consider. That is worth an article all by itself as well.

Feel free to drop me a line to talk more
chris.mayhew61@...

Also, my profession is (and has been for 25 years) that of a full-time paid on staff writer. 



 

Thanks Bill and Ike,

Now that I have achieved a victory on the CUT front, and Ludlow is moving ahead with their preservation project, I will give all of this a close look now.

I am very intrigued by the riverfront operations and station information. 


I sent Bill and email offline too.