locked Southern Automobile Car Pgm (ACP) 852, Deracking 149 auto racks in 1977


George Eichelberger
 

Although the information is very much in “raw” form and not well organized, the SRHA archives have many Mechanical Dept. and Hayne Shop files on car rebuild programs (Special Car Programs - SCPs), new car programs, (NCP and NEP) and automobile car programs, (ACPs). The files represent the “nuts and bolts” of the railroad’s rolling stock. Documents can run from orders for hardware to specifications and lists of equipment included in each project.

The following page is a good example of an internal SR document that provides a lot of information.

In 1977, the Southern had a disproportionate number of auto racks in various pools and Trailer Train wanted leased F89CH and DH flats returned for use as PB flats. The process began with GM releasing racks and Southern making arrangements to have them “deracked” and returned to TTX. Interesting items include a list of the GM assignments the cars were removed from, if the cars had shields and how they were equipped.

Ike




Charles Powell
 

Ike,
You will note that all but four of these cars were tri-levels. One of the reasons for turning these cars back was that this was at the beginning of the shift to Americans buying more pickups and SUVs which necessitated more bi-level cars.  In the beginning of 1977 I was still on the Southern Mechanical Management Training program and had completed all of the various training classes and field education assignments. I had been assigned to the Car Department in Chattanooga as a holding place until a permanent job opened up. In January I was notified that I was going to St. Louis to be an onsite inspector at a contract repair shop that was would be converting about 75 open Southern tri-levels into bi-levels with side shields. 

The shop was St. Louis Refrigerator Car Company which was a subsidiary of Budweiser, located on the Mississippi River in the shadow of the massive Budweiser brewery. The program lasted a couple of months. The process that took place entailed cutting off the top or "C" deck and raising the middle "B" deck up to the necessary height to clear trucks; making any necessary repairs to rack structures, sandblasting, painting, and application of side shields.  At the same time this work was being done on the rack, the shop was doing an overhaul of the car which was paid for by TTX.

The contract price was based on the shop doing a specific amount of work to each rack. I would go with the Shop's inspector and look at each rack when they came in. If there were repairs needed that went beyond the contract I would have to sign off on them as being necessary. An example would be if the tie-down tracks on the car were in poor condition and needed replacing instead of just sandblasting and painting. After the cars were completed I would do a quality inspection before signing off and accepting the cars. 

Charlie Powell 


George Eichelberger
 

Charlie:

Note attached invoice from ACP-864 for BTTX (ex RTTX) 914074, might this have been one of your projects?

Ike



On Jan 25, 2022, at 12:25 PM, Charles Powell <charlesspowell@...> wrote:

Ike,
You will note that all but four of these cars were tri-levels. One of the reasons for turning these cars back was that this was at the beginning of the shift to Americans buying more pickups and SUVs which necessitated more bi-level cars.  In the beginning of 1977 I was still on the Southern Mechanical Management Training program and had completed all of the various training classes and field education assignments. I had been assigned to the Car Department in Chattanooga as a holding place until a permanent job opened up. In January I was notified that I was going to St. Louis to be an onsite inspector at a contract repair shop that was would be converting about 75 open Southern tri-levels into bi-levels with side shields. 

The shop was St. Louis Refrigerator Car Company which was a subsidiary of Budweiser, located on the Mississippi River in the shadow of the massive Budweiser brewery. The program lasted a couple of months. The process that took place entailed cutting off the top or "C" deck and raising the middle "B" deck up to the necessary height to clear trucks; making any necessary repairs to rack structures, sandblasting, painting, and application of side shields.  At the same time this work was being done on the rack, the shop was doing an overhaul of the car which was paid for by TTX.

The contract price was based on the shop doing a specific amount of work to each rack. I would go with the Shop's inspector and look at each rack when they came in. If there were repairs needed that went beyond the contract I would have to sign off on them as being necessary. An example would be if the tie-down tracks on the car were in poor condition and needed replacing instead of just sandblasting and painting. After the cars were completed I would do a quality inspection before signing off and accepting the cars. 

Charlie Powell