locked Southern Lantern Fuel


Allen Cain
 

I was lucky enough to buy a Southern Lantern which appears to have never been used (maybe it is a reproduction?) and would like to light it.

It is stamped with "Use Only Long Lasting Oil".

What is the correct fuel to use?  I was thinking kerosene but now not so sure.

Thanks,

Allen Cain

--
Allen Cain
Modeling the Southern in 1955 in HO Scale


D. Scott Chatfield
 

What model and make is it?

I use regular lamp oil in my lanterns, not kerosene.  

Scott Chatfield



-------- Original message --------
From: Allen Cain <Allencaintn@...>
Date: 03/11/2021 11:27 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: "main@SouthernRailway.groups.io" <main@southernrailway.groups.io>
Subject: [SouthernRailway] Southern Lantern Fuel

I was lucky enough to buy a Southern Lantern which appears to have never been used (maybe it is a reproduction?) and would like to light it.

It is stamped with "Use Only Long Lasting Oil".

What is the correct fuel to use?  I was thinking kerosene but now not so sure.

Thanks,

Allen Cain

--
Allen Cain
Modeling the Southern in 1955 in HO Scale


 

Lamp oil is the way to go. 

Do you have a pic of the lantern?

Todd P


On Mar 11, 2021, at 11:06 PM, D. Scott Chatfield <blindog@...> wrote:


What model and make is it?

I use regular lamp oil in my lanterns, not kerosene.  

Scott Chatfield



-------- Original message --------
From: Allen Cain <Allencaintn@...>
Date: 03/11/2021 11:27 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: "main@SouthernRailway.groups.io" <main@southernrailway.groups.io>
Subject: [SouthernRailway] Southern Lantern Fuel

I was lucky enough to buy a Southern Lantern which appears to have never been used (maybe it is a reproduction?) and would like to light it.

It is stamped with "Use Only Long Lasting Oil".

What is the correct fuel to use?  I was thinking kerosene but now not so sure.

Thanks,

Allen Cain

--
Allen Cain
Modeling the Southern in 1955 in HO Scale


Felix Freeman
 

Anytime a locomotive consist is readied and offered for service there is a checklist of required supplies.  These requirements vary from railroad to railroad and have evolved over a period of time.  In the early 70s Pegram Shop was still in business and dispatching locomotives for the passenger trains.  One of the required items on each consist was a red globe kerosene lantern.   At that time I was recently hired and working there and decided that I needed one.  I found out that these lanterns were supplied and purchased from The Noland Company.  Noland was a hardware and industrial supply company.  Southern did a lot of business with these people over the years.  One day I had the opportunity to go to their place of business with the intent of purchasing one.  The salesman led me to a room where there was a huge pile of these lanterns.  He told me to take my pick and I bought one.  For $4.00.  I still have this.  It is my only Southern lantern.  Somewhere I still have my receipt. 


On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 7:55 AM Thunder via groups.io <t_pearson1212=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Lamp oil is the way to go. 

Do you have a pic of the lantern?

Todd P


On Mar 11, 2021, at 11:06 PM, D. Scott Chatfield <blindog@...> wrote:


What model and make is it?

I use regular lamp oil in my lanterns, not kerosene.  

Scott Chatfield



-------- Original message --------
From: Allen Cain <Allencaintn@...>
Date: 03/11/2021 11:27 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: "main@SouthernRailway.groups.io" <main@southernrailway.groups.io>
Subject: [SouthernRailway] Southern Lantern Fuel

I was lucky enough to buy a Southern Lantern which appears to have never been used (maybe it is a reproduction?) and would like to light it.

It is stamped with "Use Only Long Lasting Oil".

What is the correct fuel to use?  I was thinking kerosene but now not so sure.

Thanks,

Allen Cain

--
Allen Cain
Modeling the Southern in 1955 in HO Scale


 

Now that’s an excellent story. I wish I could find a spot that sold them for four bucks a pop.



On Mar 12, 2021, at 9:12 AM, Felix Freeman <freeman.felix@...> wrote:


Anytime a locomotive consist is readied and offered for service there is a checklist of required supplies.  These requirements vary from railroad to railroad and have evolved over a period of time.  In the early 70s Pegram Shop was still in business and dispatching locomotives for the passenger trains.  One of the required items on each consist was a red globe kerosene lantern.   At that time I was recently hired and working there and decided that I needed one.  I found out that these lanterns were supplied and purchased from The Noland Company.  Noland was a hardware and industrial supply company.  Southern did a lot of business with these people over the years.  One day I had the opportunity to go to their place of business with the intent of purchasing one.  The salesman led me to a room where there was a huge pile of these lanterns.  He told me to take my pick and I bought one.  For $4.00.  I still have this.  It is my only Southern lantern.  Somewhere I still have my receipt. 

On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 7:55 AM Thunder via groups.io <t_pearson1212=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Lamp oil is the way to go. 

Do you have a pic of the lantern?

Todd P


On Mar 11, 2021, at 11:06 PM, D. Scott Chatfield <blindog@...> wrote:


What model and make is it?

I use regular lamp oil in my lanterns, not kerosene.  

Scott Chatfield



-------- Original message --------
From: Allen Cain <Allencaintn@...>
Date: 03/11/2021 11:27 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: "main@SouthernRailway.groups.io" <main@southernrailway.groups.io>
Subject: [SouthernRailway] Southern Lantern Fuel

I was lucky enough to buy a Southern Lantern which appears to have never been used (maybe it is a reproduction?) and would like to light it.

It is stamped with "Use Only Long Lasting Oil".

What is the correct fuel to use?  I was thinking kerosene but now not so sure.

Thanks,

Allen Cain

--
Allen Cain
Modeling the Southern in 1955 in HO Scale


Stephen Warner
 

While the roads used kerosene, use lamp oil.  I guarantee that if you burn kerosene at home, your wife, kids, dogs and cats will kick you out of the house - it smells and belongs in a depot or caboose.  Only problem with old lanterns is that there is kerosene residual that will smell half a century later, regardless of using newer lamp oil.


D. Scott Chatfield
 

Older lanterns burned animal oil, for several reasons.  The important reason for us collectors is the older glass can not take the heat of kerosene fire.  The demand for animal oil increased a great deal during the First World War, and the government asked the lantern makers to figure how to make their lanterns burn kerosene, which was becoming more plentiful by the day.  Corning Glass developed the first globes that could withstand kerosene, but it needed a smaller frame.  This drove the development of the "short globe" lanterns.  

So aside from the smell, kerosene might also break the globe.  Unless the word KERO is cast into the globe do not burn kerosene in it.

Scott Chatfield


aramsay18
 

Wasn't whale oil also used in the early 1900's for lanterns?

Andy Ramsay
Berryville VA


On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 6:35 PM D. Scott Chatfield <blindog@...> wrote:
Older lanterns burned animal oil, for several reasons.  The important reason for us collectors is the older glass can not take the heat of kerosene fire.  The demand for animal oil increased a great deal during the First World War, and the government asked the lantern makers to figure how to make their lanterns burn kerosene, which was becoming more plentiful by the day.  Corning Glass developed the first globes that could withstand kerosene, but it needed a smaller frame.  This drove the development of the "short globe" lanterns.  

So aside from the smell, kerosene might also break the globe.  Unless the word KERO is cast into the globe do not burn kerosene in it.

Scott Chatfield


Bill Schafer
 

Fascinating tidbit, Scott - I never knew that. Thanks.

On Mar 12, 2021, at 18:35, D. Scott Chatfield <blindog@...> wrote:

Older lanterns burned animal oil, for several reasons.  The important reason for us collectors is the older glass can not take the heat of kerosene fire.  The demand for animal oil increased a great deal during the First World War, and the government asked the lantern makers to figure how to make their lanterns burn kerosene, which was becoming more plentiful by the day.  Corning Glass developed the first globes that could withstand kerosene, but it needed a smaller frame.  This drove the development of the "short globe" lanterns.  

So aside from the smell, kerosene might also break the globe.  Unless the word KERO is cast into the globe do not burn kerosene in it.

Scott Chatfield