locked Southern Railway Bridge Colors


Kevin von der Lippe
 

The City of Greensboro is working with NS and the NCRR to paint the various railroad bridges within the city limits, and would like to paint them to be historically correct for the Southern Railway.  Does anyone know what the standard paint colors were for the the railroad in the 1930s or 40s?

Thank you,

Kevin von der Lippe


Bill Schafer
 

Kevin Van Der Lippe:

I don’t know how the underpasses were painted in the 1940s, but when I was living there in the early-1970s, the McGee Street/Davie Street underpass was a dirty gray or silver, with maybe black underneath. The letter board bearing the name “Southern Railway” was silver too, and from the accompanying photo, the letters were raised and appear to have been painted black (I wonder if this letter board is still there). This is pre-Amtrak train 5, which Southern called the Piedmont, leaving Greensboro at 7:00 am in early 1971. 

35 SOU train 5 leaving Greensboro crossing Elm St. behind 6148 FP7 Mar 1971 GWS photo.jpeg

Here’s another view, taken later the same year, that shows a little bit of the underpass. In this view, it looks to me as if the underpass is silver, and that it needs a paint job. 

SOU 6308 leads two more SD24s across Elm St Greensboro NC with train 159 1971 Bill Schafer photo.tiff

Hope this helps.

—Bill Schafer

On Feb 25, 2019, at 11:10 AM, Kevin von der Lippe <kevin.vonderlippe@...> wrote:

The City of Greensboro is working with NS and the NCRR to paint the various railroad bridges within the city limits, and would like to paint them to be historically correct for the Southern Railway.  Does anyone know what the standard paint colors were for the the railroad in the 1930s or 40s?

Thank you,

Kevin von der Lippe


Carl Ardrey
 

This structure still in use by the Aiken RR is between Aiken and Warrenville.

CEA

On February 25, 2019 at 10:10 AM Kevin von der Lippe <kevin.vonderlippe@...> wrote:

The City of Greensboro is working with NS and the NCRR to paint the various railroad bridges within the city limits, and would like to paint them to be historically correct for the Southern Railway.  Does anyone know what the standard paint colors were for the the railroad in the 1930s or 40s?

Thank you,

Kevin von der Lippe


Robert Graham
 

While the Sou Ry steel bridges I shot photos of in the 1960's, 1970's, 1980's were silver in color with either black or green lettering like the one Carl Ardrey provided, I believe in the 1940's and earlier, they were painted black with either white or silver or aluminum lettering. I have attached a photo from Charlotte NC made April 24 1947 of a P&N interurban car coming in to Mint St station. The Sou Ry main line to Columbia SC passed over the P&N station approach tracks (just about where BOA Stadium is now) at that time before being relocated when the old passenger station was closed and SOU lines relocated in and around Charlotte as a result circa 1960 or thereabouts. While a B&W photo, the steel trestle girders are clearly a dark color with light lettering. I suspect this was also the case in Greensboro, as bridge colors were usually system wide and not subject to division preferences.

Also, to answer Bill Schafer's question regarding the presence of the Southern Railway letterboard on the Davie St overpass in Greensboro, it is long gone, removed by NS about the same time the other SOU bridge lettering was removed a few years after the merger. I don't think it was saved, but do not know, but if not, too bad.

Bob Graham



---- Kevin von der Lippe <kevin.vonderlippe@capital.org> wrote:

The City of Greensboro is working with NS and the NCRR to paint the various railroad bridges within the city limits, and would like to paint them to be historically correct for the Southern Railway.  Does anyone know what the standard paint colors were for the the railroad in the 1930s or 40s?

Thank you,

Kevin von der Lippe



Stephen Warner
 

I also do not know with authenticity the colors of steel structures in the 30's, but I do know that SR "greased" its steel structures in the 70's to preserve the steel. However, SR had a unit train fall through a bridge into the Big Warrior River in the late 70's, and I was there during the restoration process.  It was a through truss of which a hanger had broken.  So SR hired an ultrasonic inspection of the entire trestle, after scraping it clean.  I watched them run the tests (and I wrote the Bridge Inspection Standard Procedure), and they discovered multiple cracked hangers that the grease hid.  So SR/Joel DeValle (I believe) ordered all steel to be degreased and uncovered after that.


Kevin von der Lippe
 

Thank you for all of you help.  I have forwarded all the comments to the City of Greensboro.

 

Kevin von der Lippe