Topics

locked Ten wheeler question


Jim King
 

There has been a thread running on the S scale .IO group re: ten wheelers of all flavors.  I have several pix of Southern's 4-6-0s, including the "famous" low-numbered 903 that plied Alabama rails longer than any others.  From a modeler's perspective, Varney (later, Bowser) produced the Old Lady 2-8-0 and Casey Jones 4-6-0 in the late 50s/early 60s using the same boiler.  Some claim the boiler and other features are based on the Southern Pacific T-28 ten wheeler. which does have similarities (pilot, boiler and cylinders but not cab).  I've also heard that the boiler, cab and mechanism were "OK" if modeling a Southern 4-6-0.  The recent Bachmann 4-6-0 is unrelated to the old die cast models.

While there is no "definitive" answer to the SP claim, many historians agree that Gordon Varney wanted to appeal to a larger market than SP modelers so picked features from various engines, including SP.  He went with a USRA-style tender, likely to commonize tooling with other models.

Has anyone delved into making a credible Southern 900- or 1000-series ten wheeler from a Varney, Bowser or Bachmann model?  Personally, I like the 1100-series better because of their relative "bulk" and piston valve cylinders but they'd require a different starting point than the smaller engines.  No matter which one is picked, lack of Southern valve gear needs to be addressed.

--
Jim King
http://smokymountainmodelworks.com


William Harley
 

Diagram of the Southern F-14 can be found in “Southern Steam Power” by Ranks and Lowe.  There is a great shot of # 1094 in Richard E. Prince’s “Southern Railway Systems Steam Locomotives and Boats” on p.92.
Diagram of Southern Pacific T-31 can be found in MR Cyclopedia.
Similarities are the boiler dimensions and shape, driver size and spacing.
Most noticeable difference is that the SP cab sits about two feet farther back that the Sou F-14 cab.  This may be because the F-14 firebox took up space inside the cab or the firebox was just shorter than the SP engine.

Using the Varney Casey Jones engine as a starting point strip down the boiler of unwanted detail.
The cab could be cut off and moved 2 feet forward to get the right proportions for the Sou. F-14.
I chose to use the running gear from a Bowser PRR G-5 which has the same driver size, spacing that is close enough and a frame that is 2 feet shorter than the Varney frame. 
The steam chest from a Kemptron Wabash 2-6-0 fits the frame and boiler. 
The Southern Valve gear used to be available from Greenway Products.
The Varney Cab could be used for the base with a Mellor Cab  Wrapper which provides the arch windows and fits over the Varney Cab.
Another cab option is to use a computer printed Southern Cab available from Shapeways products.
The tender on #1094 is very close to the Jersey Central 24’ Freight Tender made by Lee Town.  This thing weighs a lot though.

This was to be my approach to building a Sou F-14.  Have all the parts but have yet to get it built.
If you want to discuss any of this, contact me off-line so we don’t infringe on the “off-subject” nature of modeling.
Cheers
Bill Harley


On Apr 22, 2020, at 3:51 PM, Jim King <jimking3@...> wrote:

There has been a thread running on the S scale .IO group re: ten wheelers of all flavors.  I have several pix of Southern's 4-6-0s, including the "famous" low-numbered 903 that plied Alabama rails longer than any others.  From a modeler's perspective, Varney (later, Bowser) produced the Old Lady 2-8-0 and Casey Jones 4-6-0 in the late 50s/early 60s using the same boiler.  Some claim the boiler and other features are based on the Southern Pacific T-28 ten wheeler. which does have similarities (pilot, boiler and cylinders but not cab).  I've also heard that the boiler, cab and mechanism were "OK" if modeling a Southern 4-6-0.  The recent Bachmann 4-6-0 is unrelated to the old die cast models.

While there is no "definitive" answer to the SP claim, many historians agree that Gordon Varney wanted to appeal to a larger market than SP modelers so picked features from various engines, including SP.  He went with a USRA-style tender, likely to commonize tooling with other models.

Has anyone delved into making a credible Southern 900- or 1000-series ten wheeler from a Varney, Bowser or Bachmann model?  Personally, I like the 1100-series better because of their relative "bulk" and piston valve cylinders but they'd require a different starting point than the smaller engines.  No matter which one is picked, lack of Southern valve gear needs to be addressed.

--
Jim King
http://smokymountainmodelworks.com