Topics

locked White Number Boards


Michael Shirey
 

 As I am adding DCC to a new Athearn GP50 I just revived. I notice something strange. The loco I am working with has a white number board #7010 and apone further research. I notice that the Southern 7003-7016 are the only GP50'S to have white number boards. All others in the fleet are all black. Can some one enplane why this is? Not trying to be a rivet counter but I find it interesting..


Sam Smith
 

The white number boards was still an indicator of loco-trol master units back in those days. Loco-trol was the name for the remotely operated Locomotives in mid-train helper service.

Samuel Smith


On Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 8:29 AM, Michael Shirey
<pcrrhs6561@...> wrote:
 As I am adding DCC to a new Athearn GP50 I just revived. I notice something strange. The loco I am working with has a white number board #7010 and apone further research. I notice that the Southern 7003-7016 are the only GP50'S to have white number boards. All others in the fleet are all black. Can some one enplane why this is? Not trying to be a rivet counter but I find it interesting..


James
 

Southern applied white number boards to locomotives that were equipped with Locotrol.  The locomotives could be used as master or slave units on those trains that had mid train helpers- as they were called then or DPU’s is the term now.

On Jul 9, 2020, at 08:29, Michael Shirey <pcrrhs6561@...> wrote:

 As I am adding DCC to a new Athearn GP50 I just revived. I notice something strange. The loco I am working with has a white number board #7010 and apone further research. I notice that the Southern 7003-7016 are the only GP50'S to have white number boards. All others in the fleet are all black. Can some one enplane why this is? Not trying to be a rivet counter but I find it interesting..

James Wall
Rural Hall, NC




Tim
 

The units with white number boards were set up as controlling units. The mid-train locomotives were connected to a radio control car (most looked like boxcars, but only end doors, no side doors). The radio control cars had MU connections to control the locomotives and any locomotives could be used.

I can remember train 169 coming into Charlotte with a fairly short train from Linwood, and all the locomotives and the R/C car on the head end. They'd make a big pickup in Charlotte and put the R/C car and locos midtrain while they were doing it. They referred to this as, "radioing the train."

Tim Rumph
Lancaster, SC


Tim
 

Here's a train doing something similar in Alexandria.

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=736111

Tim Rumph
Lancaster, SC


Michael Shirey
 

Thanks for the very informative information on white number boards and LOCO - TROL. I guess you do learn something new every day. 





Thanks, Michael Shirey 







On Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 9:23 AM Tim <tarumph@...> wrote:
Here's a train doing something similar in Alexandria.

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=736111

Tim Rumph
Lancaster, SC


Rodney Shu
 

I can remember in the mid-'60's  hearing about some bad derailments around the tunnels on the CNO&TP when the Radio Control Cars lost radio signals.  New technology sometimes takes a little time to get the bugs out.

Just think how far the industry has come.

Rod S.


From: main@SouthernRailway.groups.io <main@SouthernRailway.groups.io> on behalf of Michael Shirey <pcrrhs6561@...>
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 8:39 AM
To: main@southernrailway.groups.io <main@southernrailway.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthernRailway] White Number Boards
 
Thanks for the very informative information on white number boards and LOCO - TROL. I guess you do learn something new every day. 





Thanks, Michael Shirey 







On Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 9:23 AM Tim <tarumph@...> wrote:
Here's a train doing something similar in Alexandria.

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=736111

Tim Rumph
Lancaster, SC


Don Usak
 

In the days when Linwood was still a pipe dream and 153 came out of Pot Yard and 173, 453, and 155 originated at Spencer, all usually ran radio. As Tim says, when tonnage was light the trains would have all the power on the head end. But what most don't know is that we would often run them radio even though all the power was on the head end. This to make the Charlotte pickup much easier.

Leaving Spencer the radio equipment would be activated and there would be no MU cable and no MU hoses coupled between the head end power and what would become the mid-train power at Charlotte. The engineer knew to keep his radio unit isolated and its feed valve cut out until he made his pickup at Charlotte and while he was making his brake test at Spencer.

On arrival at Charlotte, you cut behind the head end power and leave the train and the radio car/mid-train locomotive on the main, go get the pickup and come back to the train. Didn't have to radio the train because it was already done.

Alas, this practice was frowned upon when it was discovered. A memo would come out about once a year prohibiting this and we had to lay low for a while. But no one ever came up with a good reason why this was a bad practice so we were right back at it again until the next memo came out. Good times and good railroading and lots of fun.

Regards,
Don